Cajon Backer #7 A Dorian

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I think this one is easier to play with. The chords are mainly Am7-D7, the classic dorian progression. However, it also goes to Bm7-E7. To play A dorian, you can play a G major scale, but hit the A a lot, or you can think of an A minor scale but hit F# instead of F. I used a cajon, a tele, a bass, and there is a synth pad in the background. Have fun!

 

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I went a little nuts: Congas, Guiro, Cowbell, Acoustic and Electric guitars.


This has a clockwork sort of character with the tick-tock provided by the cowbell (sounds a bit like a woodblock, maybe you taped it up) and other things providing a sort of unwinding spring effect. This sounds very Latin, except for the guitar tone, which is very interesting. I never imagined my backer would sound like this! it's very cool.
 

klasaine

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This has a clockwork sort of character with the tick-tock provided by the cowbell (sounds a bit like a woodblock, maybe you taped it up) and other things providing a sort of unwinding spring effect. This sounds very Latin, except for the guitar tone, which is very interesting. I never imagined my backer would sound like this! it's very cool.
The patterns I played are all very traditional Cha-Cha rhythms. Congas play straight 1/8s, Cowbell does 1/4s and the Guiro does the brush-tap-tap (1/4 note + two 1/8 notes). And as you notice, it all moves together like gears. *I held the cowbell tightly so that it didn't ring.

The electric guitar is a mid 60s Teisco 'Zenon'. I don't know if the tone is 'traditional' but many of the relatively modern Cuban electric guitarists use a similar tone. Think 'Buena Vista Social Club'.
 

guitarsophist

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The patterns I played are all very traditional Cha-Cha rhythms. Congas play straight 1/8s, Cowbell does 1/4s and the Guiro does the brush-tap-tap (1/4 note + two 1/8 notes). And as you notice, it all moves together like gears. *I held the cowbell tightly so that it didn't ring.

The electric guitar is a mid 60s Teisco 'Zenon'. I don't know if the tone is 'traditional' but many of the relatively modern Cuban electric guitarists use a similar tone. Think 'Buena Vista Social Club'.
I love Buena Vista Social Club, but Mambo Sinuendo even more. That is interesting about the cowbell. I have an LP Black Beauty somewhere. It always needed some gaffer's tape or a clothes pin or something to keep it from overwhelming everything else.
 

klasaine

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That is interesting about the cowbell. I have an LP Black Beauty somewhere. It always needed some gaffer's tape or a clothes pin or something to keep it from overwhelming everything else.
Mine is an old Lp and it's the smaller size. I backed away from the mic, held it tightly and didn't hit it too hard.
I also EQ'd out some high-end and used a ribbon mic which has less top end.
 
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Thanks much for the track

Doubtful Flower

That doesn't sound doubtful at all. It is played with aggressive certainty and no hesitation. You clearly have no fear of dissonance, yet there are some soft moments too, especially the chord you play at the very end. Thanks for giving the track a spin!
 

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Nice line on the intro!
The D note in that line sounds so right because it is in the E7 chord that is happening at that moment but is not in the A dorian scale. To stay in A dorian, that chord should really be Em7, but I deviated a little.
 




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