C (no 3rd) vs C5:

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by supersoldier71, Apr 27, 2018.

  1. supersoldier71

    supersoldier71 Tele-Holic

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    I'm ignorant and I know I'm ignorant but what's the difference?

    On the lead sheet that I'm working from C (no 3rd) is written as a "C" and an "F", stacked.

    Is it a convention to avoid parallel fifths?
     
  2. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    I would understand "C no 3rd" as a Csus, which is why you have the F in there. It's a Csus.


    "C5" is not really a chord, since it doesn't have three different notes in it. It describes the common rock "power chord" which again isn't really a chord, strictly speaking: it's just root/five/root/five
     
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  3. dmitri

    dmitri Tele-Holic

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    No clue why it looks that way... a no3 chord usually just drops the 3rd and is synonymous with the X5 chords.
     
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  4. JayFreddy

    JayFreddy Poster Extraordinaire

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    Can you rephrase the question? Not sure what you are asking.

    C(no 3rd) is definitely NOT a Csus.

    C and F stacked would be an F5. If the C is in the bass, it's an inversion.

    To be a Csus, it needs the C, F, and G notes, although the G could be removed as long as the line motion follows the harmony. I.e., the F note resolves down to E.

    When the chord symbol disagrees with the notes on the staff, I ignore the chord symbol and play the written notes.
     
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  5. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    C5 is absolutely a chord and in modern nomenclature clearly understood as C, G, C (a 'power' rock chord in guitar lingo). You can have as many roots and 5ths as you like.

    C no 3rd (or C no3) is essentially the same thing.

    C with F (and no E) almost always translates to Csus4 or just Csus (I've even seen it written as C4).

    *C add F can be a Csus4 or, a C triad with an added 4th. Easier to voice on a piano but neither impossible nor unheard of on a guitar. Here's an easy one: 244300 = F#7sus w/3 (very John McLaughlin).
     
  6. supersoldier71

    supersoldier71 Tele-Holic

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    Whoops, my fault. That's a G stacked on top of there. The 5th not the 4th.

    I read music like I read English when I was four. Very slowly and usually wrong.

    Also, the program that our music leader uses sometimes spits out transcription errors that can be hard to catch. They're usually pretty easy to hear, but hard for me to catch when I'm just reading the music.

    But back to my original question: a chord, minus the 3rd (Major or Minor) leaves me with those "power chords" I learned in week one of playing guitar?

    If that's the case, I got this!
     
  7. codamedia

    codamedia Poster Extraordinaire

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    This is me on any given day... with both music and English :D
     
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  8. klasaine

    klasaine Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    In a word - yes.
    *In order to sound like a 'power' chord, it will be specifically triads w/o 3.
    You can also have big fat jazz chords sans the 3rd which are a diferent animal.
     
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