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Buzzing When Plugged Straight In

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by WrayGun, Jan 13, 2020.

  1. Switchy

    Switchy Tele-Afflicted

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    You probably have noise as a baseline, but one of your pedals is acting as a low pass filter. Perhaps one of the buffers?
     
  2. gbart14

    gbart14 TDPRI Member

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    I am just an amateur at this but I can tell you from my recent experience what I found. I bought a new Meteora HH (with humbuckers) - nice guitar. Was noisy out of the box both in 60 cycle hum and buzz (as would be heard around a dimmer switch). This was unbearable for the discerning ear. Hum and Buzz are usually from different sources. Went mostly away when I touched the strings, or anything connected to ground (output cable connection, bridge, etc.). This is my only guitar of 20 with this problem. Had the grounds rewired by Fender authorized dealer because it was under warranty, lowered it just a bit. Had to move fast because I had a 7 day window for return to the shop. I bought a Hum Debugger and it cured it immediately. So, bought the guitar. Then took it apart and completely shielded all the cavities and underside of the pickguard with Stewmac copper foil tape. Made sure all the shielding was connected - cured it immediately!! My guess is that you have a shielding problem that is unique to your guitar. I was surprised at the lousy job of shielding Fender did on the new Meteora. Because your pedals attenuate it, means there is something in the pedals and their connections that attenuates it. There is no other explanation despite the "fact" that they are "true bypass". You can pull one pedal at a time out of the mix to see which one but in the end, you will need to either buy a Hum Debugger or fully shield it or both. IMHO
     
  3. mikecorey

    mikecorey TDPRI Member

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    Have you tried a different wall socket? Have you tried a different guitar? Have someone bring a guitar over and plug it in. If there's no buzz, it's your guitar. If there is, it's your amp, power source, or other electric sources in the room. Have you tried it with everything else in the room turned off (lights, etc.)?
     
    rangercaster likes this.
  4. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    To gbart's point, have we confirmed that all your shielding is grounded? That's critical.
     
  5. BFcaster

    BFcaster Tele-Meister

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    The fact that it doesn't happen with a pedal/pedals makes me think just leave the guitar plugged through that chain for now. At least that way things are grounded, correct? Safe, so I wouldn't worry about it but I also would dwell on it like crazy!
    Have you looked around the guitar cavities and maybe 'under the hood' of the amp with a flashlight, just to see if some little 'thing' is maybe touching something else it shouldn't?? A bit from the grounding pickup wire or stray/loose solder can cause issues I know. Give that a check, or check again.

    These things can bug the crap outta me, so I feel your pain. On my first guitar and amp I had buzzing. No pedals yet, but turning this way and that made it either better or worse. I found some aluminum tape (I know now that copper tape is the go-to tape but I used what my local hardware store had at the time). In the case of this Strat I did the obvious under the pickguard (all of it, they only had it covered down by the pots) and under the plastic plate covering the tremolo springs. Then I tested it, and the buzz is still gone after 30 years. Many people will shield the inside walls of the cavities too, but I was testing as I went along so needed to go no further.
    Certain appliances can cause it, and this can apply to them being in another room directly above or below you on another floor -even when they aren't on they are still 'on', audio equipment, TVs, and most recently a gift from my mother- a florescent bulb reading lamp that CANNOT be plugged in anywhere in my house or 'bzzzzzzzz'- a grounded plug or not, NO WHERE in the house -all can have an electrical influence.
     
  6. Tark1

    Tark1 TDPRI Member

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    The logical answer to your buzzing problem is that there is a ground fault at the input to your amplifier. Plugged direct your guitar is not connected to ground via the ground contact of the amps input jack. When plugged in to your pedals the amp is grounded via the mains ground and your guitar is grounded via the pedals and pedal power mains ground. Either the amp jack ground contact is corroded and needs cleaning or the ground solder joint inside the amp to the jack is faulty.
     
  7. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    If you read the thread, you'd see that's been confirmed to be good. Twice, I think.

    Welcome to the forum.
     
  8. Tark1

    Tark1 TDPRI Member

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    As I said it is the logical conclusion. You have to be real careful with this stuff. Fender frequently use an insulated jack. You may find that the nut of the jack and the amps metalwork are connected to mains ground. That does not necessarily mean that the ground contact on the input jack is connected to ground. Sorry - that's a Peavey Classic 30 - with an insulated input jack.
    Plug in an instrument cable and check for ground continuity between the sleeve of the jack on the other end of the cable to the mains ground of the amp.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2020
  9. jefrs

    jefrs Doctor of Teleocity

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    1) Check your amp is earthed. Check your guitar is grounded, hardware (essentially the bridge) to the outer of the jack. Check your mains supply is earthed (yes I know you transpondians have funny earth wiring, that's part of the problem). IMO any guitar amp should be earthed. You are holding part of the circuit, the guitar, and you are at earth. If you get a fault and the amp is not earthed the current goes through you. Even if there is no fault, stray current goes through you and you get buzzing.
    2) Does it buzz with another guitar? If it does not - then the fault is with the guitar. Look for ground wire off or reversed connection at the jack.
    3) identify which FX pedal is curing the buzz. If all of them then the PSU on the pedals may be earthed whereas the amp is not (ouch).
     
  10. GearGeek01

    GearGeek01 Tele-Meister

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    Just educated guessing but... what are you using for a power supply for the pedals? Could be it is actually doing its advertised or what its supposed to do job and eliminating the noise.

    You could test it one pedal at a time to see if it is one of the pedals that is fixing the issue. Or... take the power supply out of the equation and use batteries in the pedals and see if your buzz comes back. Not sure if they all run on batteries, though. The noise gate looks tiny, and those size sometimes require a power supply.
     
  11. teleplayr

    teleplayr Tele-Afflicted

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    The noise problem doesn't have to originate in the room you're in, but on the same circuit.

    I had an issue with my rig when I lived at my sisters house. My rig was perfectly quiet at my previous home, but at my sisters place it had a constant buzzing.

    I went through the "process of elimination" with everything plugged in the outlets in that room. No results and still buzzed!

    Turned out the culprit was a TV set in the next room that was on the same circuit.
     
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