Buying ash Telecasters as an investment?

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by dscottyg, Dec 24, 2020.

  1. dscottyg

    dscottyg Tele-Meister

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    Thanks for all the replies. I think the People saying don’t do it have good points. As it stands, I have an American Vintage Hot Rod 52 Telecaster butterscotch blonde ash that is my keeper. I had another one that I got on eBay and made $200 on in about 3 weeks, but it wasn’t worth the hassle and mental strain. Checking reverb and eBay, calculating shipping, boxing them up, hoping they make it. Hoping the buyer is happy, etc. I also sold a special edition deluxe ash MIM that I bought about 6 months ago and made $100 profit. My last two are new Vintera 50s modified butterscotch blonde on ash, 8 lbs. and 7 lbs. 10 oz. once they sell, I’m done. Time to just enjoy playing.
     
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  2. Wrighty

    Wrighty Friend of Leo's

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    Not sure short term buy / store / sell would be viable. Long term though, in all honesty, there’s been nothing radically new re ‘must haves’ on Strats or Tele’s forever! New models sell but things like fret size, neck shape, pick ups etc come and go whilst the used market remains strong. With the exception of guitars worth a lot of money because of their previous owners, most change hands between players. I reckon a stored, as new, 20 year old ash Tele or Strat would fetch more than it cost new in real terms. How much more than the equivalent alder model, just because of the wood, I really wouldn’t speculate.
     
  3. Hudman_1

    Hudman_1 TDPRI Member

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    As a guy that has bought and sold many guitars over the past 30+ years I can’t see paying more than used market value for a used MIM guitar - regardless of tone wood. USA made would hold its value better in the long run but I still can’t see paying near retail and definitely not over retail for any used, contemporary guitar. I think it’s a bad investment.
     
  4. Rhomco

    Rhomco Friend of Leo's

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    The buying and selling of guitars for investment or profit is a conspiracy started by UPS, FEDEX & USPS!
    ROB
     
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  5. sax4blues

    sax4blues Poster Extraordinaire

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    For me a significant part of investment is easy liquidity. I know of a guy who claims to have $100k Matchbox car collection. This may be true. But I know anyone could sell $100k of Tesla stock on Monday morning by 9am. How long will it take to get ca$h in hand for those Matchbox cars?

    Same for an ash Telecaster. Will you have a ready and able buyer at the moment you need that money?
     
  6. 65 Champ Amp

    65 Champ Amp Tele-Afflicted

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    I had a guitar trading friend (rip, Paul). We were both salesmen for the same company. Paul managed to hit all of the pawn shops on a weekly basis. This was before the internet caused every pawn shop owner to look at ebay asking prices. Paul did very well buying and selling to investors, as well as to players like me. I’ll never forget him taking me to his vault like room one time to play three special guitars~ Two sunburst Les Pauls, ‘58 and ‘59, both had belonged to Billy Gibbons, and a ‘57 Fiesta Red Strat. And to plug in, he had TWO vintage Plexi full stacks.
    That hour I had was better than sex.
    Paul sold the Strat to a Japanese businessman who did not bat an eye at Paul’s statement on cash only. He sent a shoebox full of cash, $14,000 if I recall correctly. The two Pauls went in the 20-30K range, which was a great profit for Paul. He was able to buy a house to fit his growing family. Only a few years later, those same two Les Pauls showed up in a Gruhn coffe table book with price tags over $200,000. But Paul had no regrets, just kept on buying and selling.
    All sold via the Vintage Guitar magazine classifieds.

    It’s a different world now with the internet, and you are not holding ‘58-‘60 bursts, so I say play ‘em.
     
  7. dscottyg

    dscottyg Tele-Meister

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    I should have not used the word investment, and asked if people think I could make money buying ash butterscotch guitars, Particularly that Vintera 50s Modified that was discontinued or Baja telecasters, to resell. Since this post I have tried it with about six guitars, and each one has made between $30 and $200, with $100 being the average. The problem is it costs about $150 in fees and shipping to sell one, so, you think you’re going to make about $250, and it comes out to be $100 profit. It’s not worth the time and effort and mental anguish tracking it, hoping it sells.
     
  8. dscottyg

    dscottyg Tele-Meister

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    I should have not used the word investment, and asked if people think I could make money buying ash butterscotch guitars, Particularly that Vintera 50s Modified that was discontinued or Baja telecasters, to resell. Since this post I have tried it with about six guitars, and each one has made between $30 and $200, with $100 being the average. The problem is it costs about $150 in fees and shipping to sell one, so, you think you’re going to make about $250, and it comes out to be $100 profit. It’s not worth the time and effort and mental anguish tracking it, hoping it sells.
     
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  9. sloppychops

    sloppychops Tele-Holic

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    Yeah, to net $100 hardly seems worth it. However, why are you factoring in shipping cost when you can have the buyer pay shipping? That said, the increased fees for sellers on Reverb and Ebay have made it harder for the small-time flipper to turn a profit. The alternative is a local sale via Facebook Marketplace and CraigsList, but then you have to deal with all the lowballs, flakes, and "Is this still available?" queries that go nowhere.

    You may want to consider parting out those ash body guitars--even if it's just removing the neck from the body. This would make shipping easier and less expensive.

    The only flips worthwhile to me anymore are on those rare guitars I find at ridiculously low prices. These are never high-end guitars, or even middle of the road guitars. They're budget level guitars. In truth, though, I haven't come across any lately.
     
  10. sloppychops

    sloppychops Tele-Holic

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    Matchbox cars aren't going for anything near what Redline Hot Wheels cars are going for. I sold a dozen or so of my Hot Wheels cars and did very well. Only sold a couple Matchbox cars and they didn't go for as much as the Hot Wheels.
     
  11. unixfish

    unixfish Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I have a lightweight ash Baja. First offer above $2500 gets it. :D

    Investments / turnover is a tricky game. You really have to be on top of the market and hustle to make money. It looks like you have made a bit, so "Respect".
     
  12. Audiowonderland

    Audiowonderland Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    No..
     
  13. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    ....
     
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