Burn a maple neck for a darker look?

SacDAve

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I would stay away from the torch method on a guitar neck it's not the same as yard art. I would get some scrap maple and experiment with dyes and stains
 

Freeman Keller

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You could also look at NavyCoffeeDrinker's current thread - his neck came out really nice looking with no fire involved.
 

eallen

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I have lightly used a torch to darken plane maple slightly on necks which is really nothing more than adding a little soot to it. Just dont get the wood anything beyond warm to avoid glue coming loose.

That is very different than roasted maple as in this pick which is quite a rich caramel color. You won't get that with a torch.

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stratisfied

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Maple gunstock getting torched in the video. Is that dark enough? lol

It's better if you turn the sound off. You can then imagine the guy gazing upon the charred remains saying things like "My wife is gonna' kill me when she sees what I just did to this Christmas present she bought for me ..."

I also love the way he left the hardware on while torching the stock. He probably thought it would magically turn to a case hardened finish by passing his magic wand of fire over it.

 
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old wrench

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That's ^^^ why the old craftsmen who built those Kentucky-type rifles used aqua fortis to get that nice rich color and enhance the grain on their maple stocks.

It's a very viable method that I've used myself :).

That burning rope story sounds like just another internet myth to me - think about it ;)


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KyAnne

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Maple DOES accept stains very well, will come out blotchy or not depending on skill of the person doing the work, requires sanding, and like anything else, may have problems. This is a stained maple neck and body, note that you can make it as dark as you want

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Roasting maple or other wood means that its heated in an oven for a fairly long period of time at moderate temperature - 250F is often quoted. The wood has no sealer or other finishes applied and the color will darken. Most of the time "roasting" is done for appearance. People do roast wood in their kitchen oven with varying degrees of sucess.

Torrification is the heating of the wood in a low oxygen atmosphere and is intended to cause the resins and moisture in the cells to change in a process similar to long periods of aging. Torrification is most commonly being done to spruce to force it to be like it was the top of a very old guitar. It will darken the wood but that is not the primary reason. You will not torrify wood in a kitchen oven.

There is a finishing technique where people wave an open flame at their wood to selectively burn some of the surface. Its not an effect that I care for.

Please feel free to do anything you want to your neck. Many aftermarket necks have some sort of sealer applied at the factory, that might create some interesting issues. Glues will soften at 150 to 250F, plastics (binding, marker dots, decals...) will probably melt. I use a little heat when I'm removing frets, it helps loosen them so they pull easily. Practicing on scrap insure that you will know how much heat and flame to apply, assuming you have some scrap. Then when the color is to your liking all you need to do is finish it.

Post pictures....
That looks beautiful!
 

Dr_Daffodil

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I've read old threads on this and other forums about people using kiwi shoe polish to darken maple necks to great effect.
 

stratisfied

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So they say. On a raw neck maybe but when I tried it on a satin poly neck like everybody claims, it wiped right off just like I would expect wax to do. The only thing that got colored was my hands.
 

Telecaster582

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Sorry this is a little late but if you want to get a roasted maple type look i found that dark brown stain can work if you put a little on and the spread it around some and repeat the process till you have the tint you like. I would advise you to sand it or put something over it because it made my neck sticky but I also am going to sand it
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Beebe

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Do it. I want to see. Look up methods for Shou Sugi Ban. The bland result described here might work in this case. You can sand it back to remove the char, highlighting the grain.

 

stratisfied

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There is a technique using heat in conjunction with Iron Nitrate to stain maple. It is the authentic finishing method used on early "Kentucky long rifles". Historically, the rifle stocks were held close to a fire with the indirect heat bringing out the figure, not burned with a direct flame. Here is a demo using a modern heat gun beginning at 27:27.

 




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