Building first home studio - guitars

Discussion in 'Recording In Progress' started by kneedleknees, Jan 9, 2019.

  1. kneedleknees

    kneedleknees NEW MEMBER!

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    I hope this is the right place to post this thread. I'm getting into audio recording and am looking to building my first home studio this year at the end of summer. I've been looking at guitars and am wondering which direction I should lean.

    I love Telecasters. I played punk rock on a lowly Squier Affinity and was impressed by what great tones even that guitar could produce. For my purposes though I need either a SUPER versatile guitar or (possibly) two guitars. The guitars I am considering are the Fender Modern Player Tele Plus, the Fender Modern Player Tele Deluxe, or a PRS SE Custom 24 or 22. However, if I go the two guitar route, I'm set on getting a PRS SE Standard 24 and Squier Telecaster (most likely the Classic Vibe or another Affinity). For the sake of versatility, which direction should I lean?
     
  2. woodman

    woodman Grand Wazoo @ The Woodshed Ad Free Member

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    I understand your dilemma,but you may be overthinking it a tad. It's less about the axe and much more about what you do with it. For the first seven years in my home studio, I got a huge variety of tones from one Tele using a five-position "superswitch." Then a friend died and left me a Les Paul, which I didn't think I'd like but ended up loving. It's really nice for fat tone and takes me places the Tele couldn't. So you're thinking straight in regard to single-coil + humbucker as your weapons of choice. A Fender classic vibe and a PRS would surely cover all the bases.

    There's nothing in the world wrong with Squiers — if you find one that plays great and has a nice tonal response unplugged, you can mod it into a fine guitar. Once you get rolling on your recording path, you'll find to sculpt and refine your guitar sound beyond belief. Good luck!
     
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  3. littlebadboy

    littlebadboy Tele-Afflicted

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    I would say, a guitar with 25.5" and another with 24.75". Whether you want the 25.5" with a humbucker option is up to you. I am yet to be impressed by PRS, but I only have tried the SE line. I'm poor.

    All the videos I made was done on a tight budget:
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzzrqFoU8rC09MfzpD8wqpg

    • I inherited an old laptop from my late father, added RAM and upgraded processor to i5 for not more than $100.
    • DAW: I chose Magix Music Maker because it has everything that works great, drums, bass, effects, editable midi samples, etc for less than $70 with free lifetime updates.
    • I have an Alesis Q49 USB keyboards for less than $80 6 years ago or so.
    • My effects processor is also an interface, I'm using a Boss GT-100 now but I used to use a Boss GT-1 for less than $200.
    • I used to get by with a good pair of desktop speakers that I got from Goodwill for $5 but I used budget Behringer studio headphones for less than $20 for mixing it down and mastering.
    • I treated myself recently with affordable studio monitors. Got demo units at Sweetwater. When I tried the 3" ones, I thought they were good enough, but when I tried the bigger ones, it was a HUGE difference.
    My set up serves me well without breaking the bank... which barely has anything anyway.
     
  4. tfarny

    tfarny Friend of Leo's

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    Honestly, for all we talk about gear on here, one good guitar that inspires you is all you need. You can install a 4-way switch on a tele to get series wiring if you need a humbucker sound, but there are a LOT of really famous rock recordings done on a bone stock tele - the tone is far, far more about your playing and your amp than it is about the guitar.

    If you are looking into a humbucker guitar, especially a HH + Trem setup, the PRS SE line is very hard to beat for the price, especially used. I have an SE and an S2 and they are both fantastic.
     
  5. etype

    etype Tele-Afflicted

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    My choices would be a used Telecaster Nashville Deluxe (like a tele, but with a middle strat pickup) and a used Guild Bluesbird (like a Les Paul, but with a low power neck and hotter bridge pickup). Maybe $1,000-$1,200 total. Only bummer is that you'd have to get some sort of modification made to get it to play the bridge and neck pickup together (but you could get those quacky Strat tones).
     
  6. littlebadboy

    littlebadboy Tele-Afflicted

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    I wasn't so convinced with the supposedly "humbucker" sound of the 4-way mod. But, it has its own unique sound. I installed a coil sized rail humbucker on mine. Same thing, it does not sound like a real full sized humbucker, but close. I was happier with it than the 4-way mod.
     
  7. VintageSG

    VintageSG Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Classic Vibe Telecaster and a top end, try before you buy, Epiphone SG. Whammy bar madness aside, you will struggle to get a better tones-per-Dollar ratio than a Tele and an SG.
    Another option, if you want two guitars, is look to the excellent Yamaha range. An upper end Pacifica is a mighty fine, versatile thing indeed and their Revstar range..Mmmmm
    All of the above, plus the many other options that'll be posted will get you a vast palette, allowing you to prioritise your spending on setting your space up, your sound traps, your monitors, your mixer or interface, your amps, mics, cabs and the plethora of ephemera which seem to accompany such a task.
    Oh, buy a bass too :) Make it a P-Bass or a Jazz and you're good to go.
     
  8. Festus_Hagen

    Festus_Hagen Tele-Holic

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    I have a Line 6 Variax for such things and it's been really nice for when I get the urge to record. Lots of different guitars in one.
     
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  9. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Friend of Leo's

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    a guitar that plays really well, will carry you a lot farther than a tonemonster that is a bear to play. if your playing in a studio you can tweak the sound to your hearts content and no one will know if it was a 1951 strat serial 0005 or a chinese ovation acoustic guitar center closeout.

    I keep 3 guitars handy when I'm recording, a yamaha aex500 (semihollow, mini humbucker neck, piezo bridge) a 60$ ibanez strat (S,S,H) and an ovation balladeer.

    I can process the signals from those to get a large variation in tones. You need to be able to differantiate the sounds, so the lead doesn't sound exactly like the rythm guitar.

    The main thing is they all play well, and I can get what I want out of them and recorded quickly without having to keep fiddling around.


    start simple and work your way up, if you're not doing vocals, you probably won't even need to do any sound treatment on the room. start with a basic room and see how it sounds. Learn to track, how to set levels, compress etc, then worry about tweaking things like micing cabinets and room mics and stereo pairs and stuff.

    the more stuff you have the more choices you have to make and the longer it will take to get things down. some of the best records in the world were done with what we would consider primitive tools.

    don't fall into the more is better trap
     
  10. bftfender

    bftfender Friend of Leo's

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    LP.SG,strat & tele
     
  11. drewcp

    drewcp Tele-Meister

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    I would suggest just going with one guitar, and getting a couple different kinds of eq pedals. Specifically the Electro Harmonix Knockout and a "normal" 5-10 band EQ, and then a compressor. It will be less expensive, and the pedals could be used with any future guitar. The Modern Player Telecaster Plus can cover a lot of sonic territory.
     
  12. tfarny

    tfarny Friend of Leo's

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    I agree with you - the only way to get something to sound like a PAF is to install a PAF, same thing with any pickup. But it is easy and cheap to do and gets you a different sound. A lot of people find it useful. I took it out on my tele (P90 in the neck) because it was too muddy with that particular combo of pickups.
     
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  13. JodanOrNoDan

    JodanOrNoDan Tele-Meister

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    I may have missed it, but what is not clear is what type(s) of music you are going to record and how you are going to record. Are you going to do direct in or are you going to mike up amps? In my experience you can get away with more direct in.

    I record mostly rock and blues. There are very few recordings that do not have a PAF equiped LP on them. Most of the time, there is also a single coil guitar (strat/tele/p-90 les paul). I prefer the mixes I get with shorter scale guitars with humbuckers and longer scale guitars with single coils.

    If you are looking for pure versatility in a single guitar I have found my PRS and my new Elite Thinline tele will deliver what I need, but that is for playing when switching a guitar mid song is not a possibility.

    Also I cannot imagine recording without a good acoustic. Even on heavy stuff I often hide one in the mix.
     
  14. littlebadboy

    littlebadboy Tele-Afflicted

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    For acoustic tracks, I just use an acoustic simulator on my electric guitar. It saves me from the trouble of how to mic and stuff. But... I have to admit that I am not much of an acoustic player nor a pro studio technician. I just record for fun and demos on my YouTube.
     
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  15. JodanOrNoDan

    JodanOrNoDan Tele-Meister

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    Pro means to me that it is your primary occupation and it feeds your kids. So by my own definition I'm not a pro either. I am just super anal and I know what sound I want to get. People need to do what works for them, their budget, and the time they have to do it. Most of all, they just need to have fun.
     
  16. WireLine

    WireLine Tele-Afflicted

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    I always have a Tele, an a Esquire, a strat, and a Les Paul all with fresh strings, etc, when I track things. I could do with one, but the sometimes one will fit so much better in the song context
     
  17. Geoff738

    Geoff738 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Get the one or ones that inspire you to write and play your best on.

    If the performance is inspired nobody will care what guitar was used.

    Cheers,
    Geoff
     
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  18. Martin R

    Martin R Friend of Leo's

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    I agree with pretty much everyone so far. Whatever you get make sure it plays in tune.
    FWIW though, a Telecaster Custom gives you that Tele twang and a humbucker.
    You'll find mic'ing an acoustic will be, uh, challenging...IMHO, the microphone will be just as important as the guitar.

    Good luck and say goodbye to life as you know it.
     
  19. Rolling Estonian

    Rolling Estonian Friend of Leo's

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    Or mics..... And the amp/s...... and.... and..... Yeah, there's a lot. For me, shopping for gear is part of the whole experience. But totally agree that the gear you choose will matter, not as much as mastering that gear, but there is something to be said about quality. Having said all that, I'm just a hobbyist so I always keep in mind that I'm doing this for fun. But GAS is fun!

    M
     
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