Building a pair of guitars for the necks I made.

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Ironwolf, Dec 31, 2009.

  1. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    I ordered the last of the parts needed for this build. Two post bridge, screws, jackplate and jack, pots, and I decided to try GFS's vintage wound "Boston Blues" pups. Here's hoping they are as good as the Retrotrons I've used.
     
  2. winny pooh

    winny pooh Friend of Leo's

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    Looks great, just please dont put the Floyd rose thing on there. I puke blood on floydies, besides you will surely attract copious amounts of bad karmajuana for such a crime.
     
  3. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    I blended the edges that were created by cutting the belly and forearm reliefs, then sanded out all the router burns and sanded the entire body to 220 grit.

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    I mixed some water based grain filler using mahogany colored wood filler, extra water and some red and dark brown dye. I want to fill the grain but still see it, so I want the filler darker than the woods normal color. I then massaged the slurry into the wood and scraped the excess with the edge of a playing card.

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    The wet slurry dries quickly and has the side effect of raising the grain as it is massaged in, killing two birds with one stone.
     
  4. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    I let the filler dry for a couple of hours, then sanded the whole thing back to 320 grit. Then I drilled for the neck screws and there respective ferrules. I never have cared for the neck plate. It always seemed kind of half a**ed to me.

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    The next step is to apply the Behlens Solar-Lux dye (Medium Mahogany Red).

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  5. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    First good, wet coat of poly. It'll take one or two coats a day for about a week to get it where I want it.

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    Last edited: Jan 10, 2010
  6. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    All the parts are on hand. Tonight and this weekend will consist of mounting and aligning the neck, then marking and drilling the mounting holes for the bridge posts. Once that is done, the body still needs a little finishing work, but it should be ready to assemble next weekend.
     
  7. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    I mounted the neck and checked it's alignment. Then I layed more of the parts in place to get an idea of how it will look.

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    Not bad.

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    Patton always insists on providing an opinion. He seems okay with it.

    Now for some more work on the finish.
     
  8. Mark-00255

    Mark-00255 Tele-Holic

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    That is one rich looking beast of a strat, wolf! I like it! What was your source of the one-piece mahogany blank. Looks very good!
     
  9. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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  10. scubadoo

    scubadoo Tele-Afflicted

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    Great work ironwolf, which plans did you use for the templates?

    And that birdseye tele looks lovely.
     
  11. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    I honestly don't don't know the original source for the plans. I found them on the site here a while back. there is a .pdf with the plan outline and a .jpg that contains all the measurements. Ther is also a full blueprint .pdf available here, but it is two large to attach.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    When I leveled the frets I used a sanding bar and stick on sand paper I acquired at the local hobby shop. It's meant for working on model airplanes and only cost $15 dollars for the bar and $3 for the roll of paper. The equivalent products from Stewart McDonald approach $100 total. Here is a shot of the neck and the tools used.

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    First the bar with 220 grit paper, and then the radiused sanding block with 320 grit were used to work the length of the fret board until all the frets showed at least a slight scuffing across their surface.

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    The top of the frets were marked with a black magic marker, and the StewMac diamond grit crowning file was used until only a hair thin line of black was visible across the fret.


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  13. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    That jobs finished.

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    Next I installed a black Tusk nut.

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    Tomorrow, I'll work on loading the scratch plate.
     
  14. jazztele

    jazztele Poster Extraordinaire

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    man, this is tasty...i love the stained mahog.
     
  15. Mojotron

    Mojotron Poster Extraordinaire

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    What's that long bar you're using - I thought about getting a 24" fret leveling bar, but perhaps there is something cheaper that will do the job?
     
  16. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    Added the tuners to the neck. Wilkinson made vintage style split post.

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  17. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    It's a sanding bar for model airplane wings that I bought at the local Hobby Town. It cost about $15. The sticky sand paper for it was acquired at the same place for less than $10. Much cheaper than StewMac.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2010
  18. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    I didn't have time to wire the pickguard today, but I did get the pots and switch mounted. The body needs a couple of more thin gloss coats, then I'll let it cure until next weekend.

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  19. SULTAN

    SULTAN TDPRI Member

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    Amazing thread as always Sir.Great inspiration for all us "newbies" out there.Could you please give more details regarding your finishing schedule?(nr of coats, curing time, sanding grids e.t.c)It seems that you have great results with poly considering that you have a couple of coats more to apply.Once again beautiful thread and a big thank you!
     
  20. Ironwolf

    Ironwolf Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    The finishing schedule varies with the piece of wood. 3 to 6 coats with a steel wool rub down in between applications. if the piece is being worked on in a warm area, this can be down every 8 hrs or so. I prefer to wait at least 24 hrs between coats, this allows the poly to become a bit harder.

    If the woods grain is not perfectly filled (as was the case here) more coats maybe necessary, wet sanding back every second or third coat until the surface no longer shows dips and gaps from the grain. After a good, level surface is attained, I thin the poly I use with mineral spirits until it flows very easily, then wipe on two or three final coats. These coats should go on like you're wetting the surface with oil, very thin, leaving only a wet surface behind the application rag. If you get small bubbles in the wet poly as you apply it, sweep them away into a pickup cavity or tap/pat them out with the corner of the application cloth. It is important that this be done quickly so the poly can level itself before it starts to setup. Again, rub down with steel wool between the coats so they can adhere to each other; poly does not dissolve into itself like lacquer.

    After the last coat has cured for a week or so, the body can be lightly buffed with automotive rubbing compound followed by SwirlX.
     
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