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Building a cabinet . . .

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by dean, Dec 25, 2020.

  1. dean

    dean Friend of Leo's

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    I've started getting pieces and parts together for my 5f11 Vibrolux build-up - the kit has been ordered, I've got the wood for the cabinet, I'm ready to order the tweed cloth, and I'm sorting through my tools to make sure I have what I need. One item I don't have is a box joint jig to cut the edges of the cabinet boards. The amp will not necessarily be a spot-on replica, but I hope it will look appropriate when I get finished. I'm wondering if the box joints are necessary for the cabinet? I know that the original tweed-era cabs were box jointed but that later cabs were butt jointed. Rather that spending the $$ on a jig, I thought I might use something like doweled lap joint for putting the box together and put the savings toward a better speaker. Do any of you have experiences, opinions, or recommendations that might help me here? I've included a basic illustration of the lap joint (minus the dowels). I could use some advice.
    Screen Shot 2020-12-25 at 2.53.07 PM.jpeg
     
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  2. schmee

    schmee Doctor of Teleocity

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    A rabbet joint is fine. Even a butted joint with good glue and screws or nails. Not as durable for sure, but if it's not a road warrior... .
    I have used serrated nails (the kind that come in colors for wood paneling, they wont loosen) to repair old Fender rabbet joints..
    Epoxy glue is nice if done that way.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2020
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  3. tubelectron

    tubelectron Tele-Afflicted

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    Since I am quite very basically tooled for woodworking, I use the screwed-glued bracing-angles method for years :

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I never fronted any issue about assembly resistance and stiffness... :cool:

    But it's me, OK ? :D

    -tbln.
     
  4. David Barnett

    David Barnett Doctor of Teleocity

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    The little ones are cute, what are the external dimensions?
     
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  5. Urshurak776

    Urshurak776 Tele-Holic

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    Lap joints are super easy (assuming you have a table saw?)

    after assembly, use three dowels across the top sides and bottom sides. It will be plenty strong and once you tweed them, nobody will ever know.
     
  6. Peegoo

    Peegoo Poster Extraordinaire

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    A glued joint is super strong when done correctly. A simple way to make a pine cab is to use butt joints or rabbet joints and glue. Use screws to temporarily hold it all together while the glue sets overnight, and then remove the screws. Nails are a no-go because unless you carefully place them, you'll strike them with the router's cutter when doing the round-over and damage the cutter or even the work.

    Glue and clamps are the way to go for a simple build. You can even install short cleats in the inside corners for added strength.

    Here's a breakdown of the top, bottom, sides, and sometimes the chassis board that's used.

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. tubelectron

    tubelectron Tele-Afflicted

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    Thanks ! :)

    The external dimensions are 400 x 400 x 200mm.

    [​IMG]

    Size comparison vs. my SF PR :

    [​IMG]

    More technical informations on this page, if you are interested in it ;) :

    https://guilhemamplification.jimdofree.com/guitar-amps/

    -tbln.
     
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  8. Mongo Park

    Mongo Park Tele-Afflicted

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    You can make your own finger joint jig. For a one off it is probably a lot of work. And needs a router or tablesaw.
    Yes I have a bassman 10 and it weights a ton and it does not have finger joints and the cab is solid. When I lift it my mind always asks why the top does not just pull off.
     
  9. Bill Moore

    Bill Moore Tele-Afflicted

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    I've been using biscuits, plenty strong, and fast.
     
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  10. dean

    dean Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks for the advice - I appreciate it!
    I have a small router table and plan on using that for the cabinet. I checked on the homemade jigs and may go that route. I have the time to do these little ancillary projects, since I’m still mostly locking down. I’ll probably take a few pics of the project as I go along and post them for some critiquing. Thanks again!
     
  11. jmp81sc

    jmp81sc Tele-Meister

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    I find the box joints to be a little fiddly, but the look great on wood cabs. If covering with tolex or tweed I wouldn't bother.
     
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  12. Mongo Park

    Mongo Park Tele-Afflicted

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    You can make the fingers big and it is less work. The bee box amps have big finger joints on them. It is about glue surface area on non end grain. Spall finger joints are overkill. As mentioned other joints do the job. Go with what you and your tool set works best.
     
  13. Lowerleftcoast

    Lowerleftcoast Friend of Leo's

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    I have used screws to pull the joint tight. You can put a couple of dowels in at this point as well. When the glue has dried remove the screws. Drill the screw holes out and glue dowels in their place.

    No screws to mess with the round-over bit.;)

    Tip: Make a right angle clamping jig.

    Look up *right angle clamping jig* on youtube.
     
  14. Nickfl

    Nickfl Friend of Leo's

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    I've done cabinets with finger joints, half blind dovetails, rabbet joints, and doweled butt joints. All of them work fine. The doweled butt joints were my least favorite just because they are the weakest and still kind of time consuming to get right, while also being the least impressive joint to the 1% of people who will notice or care. For a while, rabbet joints were my go to if they weren't going to be visible, but now I prefer the half blind dovetails because they are the best of all worlds, strong, nice looking, and very quick with a jig. I would only do finger joints if it is very important to you that the cabinet be perfectly vintage accurate, finger joints are a lot of work and a huge PITA to get just right IME.
     
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  15. D_Malone

    D_Malone Tele-Holic

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    This. People make such a big deal about box joints, or dovetails.

    Rabbets, dados, dowels, all plenty strong if done right.
     
  16. Jesco

    Jesco TDPRI Member

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  17. MLHull

    MLHull TDPRI Member

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    Anyone tried using a Kreg pocket hole jig?
     
  18. FenderLover

    FenderLover Poster Extraordinaire

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    When I recovered my Matchless, I was surprised to see simple butt joints with internal blocks. Lots of glue area, plenty strong, easy construction.
     
  19. dean

    dean Friend of Leo's

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    After reading all these suggestions and watching about 20 videos on Youtube, I decided to try a homemade jig for my router. I figured if I was going to do a cabinet, I'd be doing a lot of routing anyway. The biggest issue I have is that I really can't do the routing in my basement - it's too dang messy. So my next purchase will be a garage heater that will get the temps above 7 degrees here in St. Paul and a B&D Workmate to do the sawing and to put the router on. If my test runs don't work, well then I'm out a few pieces of scrap wood, a few screws and an hour of my life. I can use a different style joint if this ends in utter failure. I believe the box cuts are 1/2" on the amp cabs - right? That's how I have it set up. I've attached a pic of the setup (still have one slot to cut). I'll post the results of my tests in a couple days. Again, thanks for the assistance!

    IMG_3953.jpeg
     
  20. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Poster Extraordinaire

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    When I built mine I made a sled for my router table

    IMG_2986.JPG

    IMG_2990.JPG

    IMG_3027.JPG
     
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