1. Win a Broadcaster or one of 3 Teles! The annual Supporting Member Giveaway is on. To enter Click Here. To see all the prizes and full details Click Here. To view the thread about the giveaway Click Here.

Building a 14" wheel buffer.....for way way under $700

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by Muzikp, Jul 3, 2013.

  1. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,273
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2010
    Location:
    Sacramento
    Yep I noticed that but I did find some on eBay. Also Stewmac sells the 12" buffs with the 3/4" Arbor.
     
  2. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,230
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Location:
    USA
    These are a good solution. A little pricey but this is for 5 sets.

    Arbor Flange Adaptors
     
  3. Shepherd

    Shepherd Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,113
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Location:
    Maple Ridge, Canada
  4. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    Easy solutions are out there if you know where to look. :D
     
  5. michael0703

    michael0703 Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    413
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2011
    Location:
    Ponchatoula, La
    Here is my version I converted from a wood lathe. I also used 3/4 threaded rod. Im waiting on the buffing wheels to come in. Should work just fine



    image-2701755866.jpg



    image-1437999605.jpg



    image-1708716006.jpg
     
  6. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    James, did you ever get the big buffs for this one, and finish the cover?
     
  7. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,273
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2010
    Location:
    Sacramento
    Got the 14" buffs (2 on each side) I swap one side out for a single I use just for polishing fretboards since it makes the buff all black. I built a wood cover to go over the spinning flywheel and belt, turns out it was always in the way so I took it off. I'm sure it wont be long before it sucks in my shirt sleeve and I have a Wil-E-coyote moment or something.

    Even with the 14" buffs heat build up is still a concern. You can burn through the finish quickly on the edges with this thing. If I were doing it over again I might make it turn at an even slower RPM.

    I'm now using the stewmac bars of polishing compound (Menzerna I think it's called). I use the medium and fine. I never mix the compounds on the buffs, I use the right side for medium and left side for fine.

    Something I learned the hard way, always let whatever you are buffing cool down before wiping a rag across it to get all the buffing dust off. If you do that right away (which is a strong temptation to see how it looks minus all the dust) the rag scratches the warm finish really easily.

    One thing I'm really glad I did was put the pvc over the threaded rod, last week I was polishing a headstock, slipped off the buff and the neck hit the pvc. If that was exposed threaded rod the neck would have to go back through the paint dept :D. Instead... nothing happened. Nothing is good.
     
  8. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    Yikes! Don't even think about getting your shirt sleeve in there. :eek: One arm guitar picker is too tough of a job.!

    I've been sloooooowwwwwly picking up parts for one pretty much based on yours. I've been debating whether to include it in a combo tool that has a thickness sander and buffer driven off the same motor (see LMII's buffing video, where I got the idea), or just make a simple, hang-it-in-the-wall version like yours. Both ways have merit. Decisions, decisions.

    The LMII guy (Robert O'Brien) fits his belt very loosely on his buffer pulley, so it will slip some under pressure, which he says is to keep it from digging in too much, and overheating. Seems to make sense, and your tip on letting the thing cool down before wiping, etc. is valuable information.

    I got some small sticks of buffing compound that are packaged in such a way as to look like Menzerna, but don't have the name, it's something else. I think they're German, which IIRC, is what Menzerna is. They were a LOT cheaper.

    I liked your idea of putting the PVC over the metal threads on the shaft, and have planned to copy that from the get-go. Your experience just proves what a good idea that was.

    Thanks for the shout back. I'll post what I come up with, when I come up with it--someday!
     
  9. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,273
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2010
    Location:
    Sacramento
    Hmmm... The slack idea is brilliant.

    I'll have to check out the video, my small mind can't make out how both those tools would occupy the same motor. A thickness sander is my next hurdle, probably not going to make my own though.
     
  10. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    Here's the video:

     
  11. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,273
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2010
    Location:
    Sacramento
    What a great song on the intro...
     
  12. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    I really like all their videos. Robert is very generous with great information, and most of the videos have some pretty good pickin' in the background, in addition to the intro music.

    If you're interested Grizzly has some of their buffs on sale, some for pretty good prices. I ordered up several 12" soft flannel cotton ones for around $6-7 a pop, normally around $18. Now I just need to get past that choke point at the cost of Menzerna. I may try my little brand X sticks first on an inconspicuous place. I think they'll work OK.
     
  13. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,273
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2010
    Location:
    Sacramento
    Hi Michael. How does this version work? I'm just wondering how much flex the coupler and shaft has in it. I would like to make my buffs further from the motor but figured the coupler wouldn't keep the shaft even and it would spin all wonky. If yours spins somewhat balanced I might try and put couplers on mine and add 8" or so to the lengths of my shafts.

    I really like the variable speed adapter you are using on your belt. Good idea.
     
  14. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,761
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Location:
    Oklamerica
    I'm not sure how I missed this thread the first time around, but that's a great design, James. Nicely done!

    If anyone is still needing motors, I've got 3 motors at the house that I'd planned on using for various projects, but truth be told, those projects are so far in the future that I can't even see them right now. 2 of them are older, bushing motors, so you need to oil the bushings once a year (no big deal with the oil zerks), but I believe they are both 1725 motors because I got them for my DP refurb initially. I've also got a more modern 3750 motor. If anyone wants one, just pay shipping and it's yours.
     
  15. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    I think I have just the right motor for mine, Roger, but thank you for the offer. Little ancient Sears motor from my father-in-law's shop. But keep at least one of your slower speed ones, Rog, for your own buffer. The brillance of James' design is that it's dead simple, and stores easily. Parts aren't really too awfully expensive (unlike menzerna compound! :eek:). Buffer really makes fast work of a shiny finish.
     
  16. PapaWheelie

    PapaWheelie Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    171
    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2010
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I copied Sheperd's idea (thanks guy) and built one yesterday. All together with Shop Fox buffer from Grizzly, shipping, lumber, electrical, hardware, casters and belt, the cost was about $175. The buffs are 8" but I plan on getting 10" soon. The motor was a rummage sale find about 25 years ago for $3 that was in a homemade spindle sander. It runs smooth and the 1/3 HP motor seems more than enough.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  17. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    15,911
    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Location:
    Loganville, Ga.
    Cool. I especially like how you did the switch on that. How much did you pay for the spindle/bearing/pulley assembly?
     
  18. PapaWheelie

    PapaWheelie Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    171
    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2010
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    It was $99.95 plus $13.95 shipping from Grizzly. I put the switch high so there was nothing, or as little as possible, to accidently bump the guitar when buffing.
     
  19. Muzikp

    Muzikp Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,273
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2010
    Location:
    Sacramento
    Was reminded of this thread through a PM. Got me thinking I actually had a vid of it in use. Here's 44 seconds you'll never get back if you decide to watch :D

     
  20. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    7,761
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Location:
    Oklamerica
    I really think one of these has moved up quite a bit higher on my list. Of the 4 guitars I'm working on, 3 of them will be showroom shiny finishes. The only way for me to get them where they need to be will be to rig up a buffer.

    Thanks for bumping this, James.
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.