Build Muscle, Lose Weight?

cycler

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Not sure, but, if I remember correctly the pushups do not have to be done all at one time. 25 morning, 25 noon, 25 early evening, 25 before bed.
 

thechad

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This is a bit aside from your topic @PastorJay but I just wanted to suggest adding swimming to your exercise regimen if you don’t do it. It can be intimidating to be in a swim suit especially when you are feeling out of shape, but once you are in the water nobody can see! Swimming works all muscle groups, and is very low impact which helps reduce stress on joints and can help prevent old injuries from flaring up. I’m not a great swimmer by any means, but form isn’t important either. Trying out a variety of swimming styles also expands the muscle groups you exercise. You can incorporate using a kick board to do some laps working just your legs, or float your feet and focus on upper body work. If you stick with it, you will see large improvements in a relatively short time. Best wishes to you!
 

FuzzWatt

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I agree. That's the thing about "discuss this with your doctor" advice. Every doctor is going to give you different information. Why should I assume that *my* MD is going to give me the best information for me? More often than not, they'll repeat dogma that they learned in med school (and they don't all learn the same material, either) which may or may not be the best.

I'm very fortunate with my GP. He's in his late 60's but keeps up with the times. I've spoken to him about various weight loss techniques including a keto diet. His approach is basically, "whatever works for you and doesn't cause more harm." He's not a black and white kinda guy at all.
 

effzee

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Not sure, but, if I remember correctly the pushups do not have to be done all at one time. 25 morning, 25 noon, 25 early evening, 25 before bed.
I think 25 push-ups in one sitting is way too much for most people. And doing that 4 times a day could seriously lead to shoulder injury.
 

lammie200

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As a 62 year old who weights about 214 pounds, how much protein do I really need?

I'd appreciate your suggestions. Thanks.
Probably not as much as you think. Excess protein turns to fat. The best way that I have found to maintain a healthy weight (I am 5'10" and 160 lbs.) is to limit carbs bigtime. Proteins are the easiest to digest unless you eat to much of it. Fats are the hardest to digest but you will likely get sick from eating too much fat so it should be easy to regulate how much fat you eat. They are also good for sustained energy. Digesting carbs is somewhere in between easy and hard. For some people it is hard and some people have an easier time with it. It is very likely to become more difficult with age. What you don't digest turns to fat storage in the body.
 

Hodgo88

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There are ways to add muscle and lose weight by very closely monitoring and cycling your caloric intake, but it's harder than just picking a single goal at a time. 3 months of bulking followed by 3 months of cutting is easier to me, personally, than trying to nail my macros every day to perfectly respond to my workouts.

The other option is talking to your doctor about supplementing your testosterone, which can help with your overall body composition in concert with regular exercise and a good diet.
 

GeneB

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I'm almost 10 years older than the OP so here's my personal advice. I go to Anytime Fitness (paid for by Silver Sneakers) three times a week. I do about 30 minutes cardio to warm up then lift, push, pull weights on the various machines for another half hour or so. I ride a bike two days a week at a 12 mile nature walk. And one round of golf a week. As I aged, I was able to lose weight and keep it off. I'm 5' 8" and 160 lbs ... 34" waist. I can no longer body build BUT I have stamina, walk my Corgi at least two miles a day, and can keep up with anyone younger. Point is, you want to get toned and lose the weight ... and live a longer healthier life. Don't concentrate on muscle mass ... your joints will fail you as you age and that muscle will turn to fat.
 

Timbresmith1

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I've been fighting my weight, and my genetic predisposition toward my grandfather's body shape, for 23 years, give or take a few months.
Ten or eleven years ago, at 51, I was in maybe the best shape of my life. I was technically overweight at 180, but probably stronger than I'd ever been.

Then my late wife got sick, and for the next six years the energy that had been going into getting and keeping me in shape went into keeping her alive. It didn't help that I eat when I'm stressed. Since she died I haven't been able to get on a regular sustainable exercise and diet plan that worked.

I was doing well last fall until I had in injury. And I've been doing ok the last few months. I'm down about 17 pounds from the 231 I weighed before I got serious last fall.

AT 62, though, I can't work out hard like I could at 45 or 50. Build muscle, lose weight, worked great in my 40s.

Now if I get enough protein to put on muscle, it seems like I'm getting too many calories to lose weight.

Do I have to choose? What do you think?

As a 62 year old who weights about 214 pounds, how much protein do I really need?

I'd appreciate your suggestions. Thanks.
What’s your protein source?
How tall are you?
 

t-ray

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When I start to get too soft in the middle, I cut out the starch from my meals - potatoes, rice, pasta, etc., and eat a protein and a vegetable. I also generally only eat one proper meal a day, and try to have healthy snack-like habits for breakfast and lunch hours - fruit and a decent breakfast bar, for example. Before I know it, the excess has melted away. Does not work for everyone, but it is easy to try out.
 

Maguchi

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I've been fighting my weight, and my genetic predisposition toward my grandfather's body shape, for 23 years, give or take a few months.
Ten or eleven years ago, at 51, I was in maybe the best shape of my life. I was technically overweight at 180, but probably stronger than I'd ever been.

Then my late wife got sick, and for the next six years the energy that had been going into getting and keeping me in shape went into keeping her alive. It didn't help that I eat when I'm stressed. Since she died I haven't been able to get on a regular sustainable exercise and diet plan that worked.

I was doing well last fall until I had in injury. And I've been doing ok the last few months. I'm down about 17 pounds from the 231 I weighed before I got serious last fall.

AT 62, though, I can't work out hard like I could at 45 or 50. Build muscle, lose weight, worked great in my 40s.

Now if I get enough protein to put on muscle, it seems like I'm getting too many calories to lose weight.

Do I have to choose? What do you think?

As a 62 year old who weights about 214 pounds, how much protein do I really need?

I'd appreciate your suggestions. Thanks.
29899073ddffcc133a9fba1fc1e29c8a--retro-ads-vintage-advertisements.jpg
 

Toast

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I've been fighting my weight, and my genetic predisposition toward my grandfather's body shape, for 23 years, give or take a few months.
Ten or eleven years ago, at 51, I was in maybe the best shape of my life. I was technically overweight at 180, but probably stronger than I'd ever been.

Then my late wife got sick, and for the next six years the energy that had been going into getting and keeping me in shape went into keeping her alive. It didn't help that I eat when I'm stressed. Since she died I haven't been able to get on a regular sustainable exercise and diet plan that worked.

I was doing well last fall until I had in injury. And I've been doing ok the last few months. I'm down about 17 pounds from the 231 I weighed before I got serious last fall.

AT 62, though, I can't work out hard like I could at 45 or 50. Build muscle, lose weight, worked great in my 40s.

Now if I get enough protein to put on muscle, it seems like I'm getting too many calories to lose weight.

Do I have to choose? What do you think?

As a 62 year old who weights about 214 pounds, how much protein do I really need?

I'd appreciate your suggestions. Thanks.
I don't know who Abel James is, but I've been a Gary Taubes fan since I read Good Calories, Bad Calories a long way back. Anyway, exercise is great I recommend it, but it won't help you lose weight. It will help you gain weight because it will make you hungry. I'd recommend that you focus on your diet and get that worked out first, then work on adding more exercise in your life. Anyway, the following video might give you some insights.
 

telemnemonics

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Well we generally have a set of fitness practices to choose from and do not have to employ them all or even have all the goals.

Losing fat and building muscle can be separated.
Are both exactly equal in importance?
Or can you/ we consider in our 60s we can be happy just keeping the fat down without also being body builders?

I have that choice to make and went with preventing or minimizing the gut being #1.
Keeping normal muscle mass seems fine and I accept that I cant make teen girls swoon on the beach any more with my physique.

Or if I choose bulky muscle mass, maybe some extra chub is less bothersome since at least I look kinda ripped?
But then I have a set of all original joints I hope will work well enough for the rest of my life.
Trying to cut all fat while eating to bulk up is a bigger job, too big for me...

Cut carbs and eliminated last meal of the day carbs.
Active lifestyle.
Thats all I got, sorta works for me...
 
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PastorJay

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There are ways to add muscle and lose weight by very closely monitoring and cycling your caloric intake, but it's harder than just picking a single goal at a time. 3 months of bulking followed by 3 months of cutting is easier to me, personally, than trying to nail my macros every day to perfectly respond to my workouts. . . .
Thanks all for your suggestions. I've come out somewhere near what Hodgo88 is saying here. I can focus on losing weight or getting stronger and building muscle, but not both at one time. What worked for me in my 40s will not work in my 60s. What a shock!

I lost about 8 pounds last fall, through Thanksgiving weekend. Lost about 11 more the first 11 weeks of this year. During those times I was seriously restricting calories and doing some light weight lifting with lots of reps and a little bit of cardio.

What exercises I can do is limited by a variety of injuries to knees and ankles or other problems accrued over the years. Without going into detail, suffice it to say that I can't run and many days it hurts to walk. I can lift weights and ride a bike. So that's what I do. I loved the suggestion about swimming. I may try that over the summer.

I started lifting heavier in mid- or late-March, and also started paying attention to protein intake, while still trying to keep carbs low and generally avoiding potatoes, rice, junk food, etc. Since then I haven't lost weight but I've got smaller and stronger.

So my current plan is to alternate focusing on weight loss with focusing on gaining strength and building muscle. 19 pounds down. 32 to go.

Thanks again.
 

teletail

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Protein quantities are way over-hyped. 50 or 60 grams a day is all you need. The meat and milk industry are pushing most of this mis-information. I used to believe all the BS about protein. I was into bodybuilding and was taking in so much protein that I was a noxious fart factory! Living the bodybuilding lifestyle led to a heart attack in '16. Pro bodybuilders life expectancy is mid 40's. I now do cardio at least 5 times a week.
Anyway, I've read quite a bit about human protein needs. Human breast milk is very low in protein because humans don't need much.
I'm currently around 180lbs, in decent shape (run/ride bikes/lift weights) and I take in less than 60 grams of protein a day, all from plants.
Preach it brother! We have been so bamboozled by the food industry, we don’t know which way is up. Remember “the incredible, edible egg” campaign? Eggs are 50% fat, the only incredible thing is that people fall for their BS.
 

PastorJay

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I don't know who Abel James is, but I've been a Gary Taubes fan since I read Good Calories, Bad Calories a long way back. Anyway, exercise is great I recommend it, but it won't help you lose weight. It will help you gain weight because it will make you hungry. I'd recommend that you focus on your diet and get that worked out first, then work on adding more exercise in your life. Anyway, the following video might give you some insights.

This is interesting--although it would have been more interesting if it were only half as long.

My take away from listening to Taubes is that "eat less--exercise more" is only partially right for weight loss.

And I think that's true. Every successful weight loss plan is some version of that--but not every version of that will be successful for a given individual. And different versions will work for different people.

He's a fan of Keto--which he seems to admit is a revised version of Atkins. I'll look for his coming book on diabetes, as I'm borderline between pre- and diabetic.

In my 40s I used a plan called Body For Life, which was based at least loosely on how bodybuilders eat. There was one version for weight loss. And another version for weight maintenance. I didn't follow it strictly, but it worked for me.

The weight loss version was eating small meals 4 or 5 times a day 3 to 4 hours apart, with each meal being one helping of protein and one helping of a fruit or vegetable. Minimize breads, pasta, potatoes, etc. So it was essentially low carb--although probably not as extreme as Atkins or Keto.

When I had enough control over my life to eat that way and get to the gym regularly, I could lose 1 or 2 pounds a week. Then I'd go through a period where I didn't have that much control, and I'd put back on 5 or ten pounds. When I got back on it as my schedule allowed I'd lose 20. Again, it worked for me.

I know people these days who eat (almost) strictly carnivore, or eat one meal a day (OMAD), or do intermittent fasting. My body lets me know when I need to eat, and I need to eat at least twice a day, usually three times and sometimes with a healthy snack in the middle. And I need some vegetables to feel healthy.

I still try to keep the carbs relatively low and minimize bread, pasta, rice, etc., although I'll have a small helping of rice with dinner tonight.

Thanks for the video.
 

Toast

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This is interesting--although it would have been more interesting if it were only half as long.

My take away from listening to Taubes is that "eat less--exercise more" is only partially right for weight loss.
Sorry about the length of the video. It's actually a complicated topic and takes some study to truly get a little control over your nutrition. I think Taubes would say that he is a fan of high fat diets. If you learn music, the first distinction you learn is major versus minor. When it comes to nutrition, the first major distinction is about food: fat, protein, and carbohydrate. I don't think Taubes would agree with "eat less" when it comes to eating. If you eat the right food (low carb), then you can always eat to satiety and not gain weight. The problem is that most of us are addicted to carbs and it's no small task getting over that addiction. Anyway, good luck with your health.
 

Peegoo

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No need to build muscle; instead, cut out sugars and fats. What will happen is the proportion of muscle mass to overall body mass will increase as a result of your weight loss. Stay active. Simply being on your feet instead of sitting will work wonders. Cut back on TV; that usually involves hours of sitting.

Weight loss and getting into shape is not something you simply do. Instead, it's something you have to hammer into your brain; you have make a conscious decision that your current physical condition is undesireable/disgusting/etc., and you are going to change it permanently. It's a different lifetyle than what you're currently living.

This allows you to make connections with habits and foods that contribute to your current physical condition. It becomes easier to say "no" to that donut, because the donut prevents you from achieving your goal.

Good luck!
 




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