Buffing machine build.

eallen

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$200 stationary buffer is done and ready for buffing wheels! After Davecam's stability question I changed the base feet over to the 4" tube and extended them 3" forward so they are even with the buffing rod. I figure the 7" that 14" buffs stick out will keep my feet clear of them. Now it is solid as a rock.

Since the motor is 110v or 220v I went with a paddle switch that for both. I have 220 in my shop but since I am not sure where it will land for use I wired the motor for 110. It runs quiet and smooth.

My future add on's: I drilled and tapped the 4 corners for some adjustible feet since concrete is never the same in 2 locations; A front set of wheels that engaged when I lean it forward like a 2-wheel dolly to move it; I may hold off on making a belt guard; A shelf to lay buffing compound on while working.
What else does it need?

Total cost using reclaimed metal? Only $100 as it stands. Another $100 for 14" buffs for a total of $200. I'm pleased and sure buying one like it would cost mulitple times more.

The rod thread length is only 2" on each end so I may have to cut longer threads after I get some wheels to see how long I need. Wheels will be a while since I don't start building guitars again until spring.

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old wrench

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Nice and clean looking job Eric!
The little details like the capped tubing ends and the covered wiring connections look great.

Have you done any calc's as to speed with the 14" wheels? Usually, with buffers and belt grinders the speed is figured in feet per minute at the point of contact.

I really don't know what is optimum speed for buffing laquere, my experience with buffers has all been with metals. I've got a little 9" right-angle buffer I use on auto paints, but that's a whole different thing.


Edit: The short threaded section on the shaft ends won't pose any problem at all if you use 1" i.d. collars with set screws.

Best Regards,
Geo.
 
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eallen

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Thanks Old Wrench. Right now I have a 2" pulley on the motor which will give an rpm of 985 which is a little fast. I have a 1.5" pulley I will be using that will give an rpm of 740 which is more on target. I am basing my desired speed off of Stewmac's machine of 715 rpm for 14" wheels. If need be I can go slightly larger on the shaft pulley. Using my drill press in the past I ran around 1000 rpm with an 8" buff.

I am not sure I am familiar with your collar and set screw thoughts on my thread lenth? I am planning on running 2 buffs per side sandwiched between 2 nuts and plates.
 

old wrench

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Eric, what I meant about the collars is if with the existing 2" of threads you don't have room for two 1" nuts and washer plates and the thickness of your buffs, you can always slip a 1" i.d. collar that is secured in place with a setscrew on the shaft first, then washer plate/buff/buff/washer plate followed up by the outboard 1" nut to draw everything up nice and snug.
 

R. Stratenstein

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Beautiful, professional job!

One tip that Robert O'Brien gives in his LMII "Luthier Tips Du Jour" video on buffers is that he intentionally used a slightly oversized belt so if he bit into the buffs too hard, they'd stall and lessen the chance of burn-through. Don't know if that would work with a segmented belt, but thought I'd throw it out FWIW.
 

eallen

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Beautiful, professional job!

One tip that Robert O'Brien gives in his LMII "Luthier Tips Du Jour" video on buffers is that he intentionally used a slightly oversized belt so if he bit into the buffs too hard, they'd stall and lessen the chance of burn-through. Don't know if that would work with a segmented belt, but thought I'd throw it out FWIW.

Thanks! I had read that as well. I don't see why it wouldn't work on a segmented. I am hoping to try out varying degrees of tightness to get a feel for pressure. I wonder how much sooner a loose belt would wear out by it slipping all the time or if it is negligible?
 

Davecam48

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Looks great Eric. Very professional as Rick said. If you run into a problem with belt tension you could easily add a couple of roller bearings on an adjustable bracket to calibrate the tension.

DC
 

R. Stratenstein

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Thanks! I had read that as well. I don't see why it wouldn't work on a segmented. I am hoping to try out varying degrees of tightness to get a feel for pressure. I wonder how much sooner a loose belt would wear out by it slipping all the time or if it is negligible?

My impression is that it would slip little under normal use, but obviously experience will give the best indication. It also occurred to me that as the belt heats up during a buffing session, it would expand and become looser--wouldn't it? My guess is that wearing to the point of needing replacement would be negligible, and very infrequent. In any case, I don't think periodically having to replace a worn out belt comes close to the hassle of fixing a burn-through. Also, as you gain experience with your buffer, your increasing skill level will help you avoid burn-through.

BTW, I found that Grizzly has a good selection of Luthier-friendly buffing wheels and Menzerna compound, and at the time I bought mine, better prices than I found elsewhere. If you haven't sourced these yet, might be worth checking them out. http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-...486?utm_campaign=zPage&utm_source=grizzly.com
 
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eallen

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My impression is that it would slip little under normal use, but obviously experience will give the best indication. It also occurred to me that as the belt heats up during a buffing session, it would expand and become looser--wouldn't it? My guess is that wearing to the point of needing replacement would be negligible, and very infrequent. In any case, I don't think periodically having to replace a worn out belt comes close to the hassle of fixing a burn-through. Also, as you gain experience with your buffer, your increasing skill level will help you avoid burn-through.

BTW, I found that Grizzly has a good selection of Luthier-friendly buffing wheels and Menzerna compound, and at the time I bought mine, better prices than I found elsewhere. If you haven't sourced these yet, might be worth checking them out. http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-...486?utm_campaign=zPage&utm_source=grizzly.com

Thanks for the tips and thoughts! Good stuff. No doubt on the burn thru. I did it once in my early buffing experience and a pain to work around!

I do source from Grizzly from time to time. Unfortunately the largest wheels I could find from them was 12" for a 1-1/4" shaft and I am planning to use a 14" with 1" shaft, which Stew Mac has for decent. I have some time so if anyone knows a better option I would be thrilled to know it? I do like the look of the Menzerna compounds from them. Stews bars are significantly smaller.

While making my own is an option for some, if I paid myself an hourly rate I can buy them much cheaper.
 

eallen

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The belt guard is mounted and functional. Right now I don't see a need to sheild the bottom as I don't see anyone intentionally sticking their hand up underneath a running machine. I am debating the need for an inner sheild with the main bar being a barrier to a degree. I can just bolt a verticle peice later to the guard if need be so it all comes off striaght up as one piece.

Now to mound some wheels I picked up from Harbor Freight. I need to figure out some sort of tray to set buffing materials on while being used and maybe even store them.
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eallen

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A couple more refinements. I realized my original caster plan to move it like a 2 wheel dolley was going to leave the wheels sticking out and prone to getting damaged. I needed to add some leveling feet to allow the space needed for it to work the way I wanted. I used 3/8 bolts for levelers to start with until I get around to ordering some real feet. They were needed anyway with as wavy as my concrete floor is.

Since my OCD hates cords slopped all over the placed I drilled and taped a long 5/16 bolt on the back for a cord hanger.
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Davecam48

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Eric you may find that with the vibration of the machine the castors with the locks built in may be more successful than the free wheeling castors, especially with the much smaller surface area of a bolt head on the opposite side of the base as opposed to the much larger area of the flat square section steel profile. The way it is at the moment I think it will have the tendency to "wander". Hope I'm wrong.

DC
 
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eallen

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Eric you may find that with the vibration of the machine the castors with the locks built may be more successful than the free wheeling castors, especially with the much smaller surface area of a bolt head on the opposite side of the base as opposed to the much larger area of the flat square section steel profile. The way it is at the moment I think it will have the tendency to "wander". Hope I'm wrong.

DC

Dave, as you indicated I anticipate the lack of friction from the bolt heads may be a problem. I can see them being prone to wandering. I think I am going to have to come up with some alternative feet options. These are just what I had in the bin so I could mount the wheels. I could weld some large washers or plates onto the bolt heads and put antiskid material on them?

Right now I have the feet adjusted so the casters only touch when the buffer is tilted forward to move. I wonder if Iowering it down with locking casters would help over them not touching at all? I looked for locking non swivel casters this size when at Harbor F. but didnt see any at the time. I suppose I can change things later as needed
 




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