Buffing machine build.

eallen

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2013
Posts
2,745
Location
Bargersville/Indianapolis, Indiana
For the past 5 years I have been using my drill press for buffing with relatively decent results but not perfect. Add to that a bearing rattle developing in my press and I decided it is time to build a dedicate buffing machine.

I snagged a never used 1hp 1725 rpm motor off cragslist from a closing auto shop for a phenomonal $60!!! For the stand and structure I am using a reclaimed square steal parking lot pole a snow plow knocked down.

The rod I am using for the buffer is a 1" diameter, 36" long go cart axle I bought online for about $50. The pillow blocks and pulleys I found on amazon. Getting my initial mock up started before welding it all together. I am still conteplating how I want to do the feet in my mega limited space shop.

1510278884273.jpg
1510278911224.jpg

1510278918232.jpg
1510278922129.jpg
1510279066879.jpg
 
Last edited:

eallen

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2013
Posts
2,745
Location
Bargersville/Indianapolis, Indiana
You will have to disassemble the whole shaft to install the v-belt. Right?
I am just mocking it up now to make sure everthing fits since I am making it up as I go. I will just have to loosen the set screws in the pillow blocks and shaft pulley and pull the shaft out half way to slip the belt on it. I assume it is similar on all arbors since they have a one peice shaft.
 
Last edited:

old wrench

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Feb 2, 2017
Posts
3,114
Location
corner of walk and don't walk
You will have to disassemble the whole shaft to install the v-belt. Right?

Not necessarily.
A segmented V-belt could be used; they run very smoothly.

That looks like a nice start, you'll like having the extra long shafts. It really opens up your access to the buffing wheels. You will be running a relatively short V-belt, one of the segmented belts might work real well for you. Is your motor 3/4 h.p. or larger?

Edit: I just reread your post and see you have a 1 h.p. Good deal!

Best Regards,
Geo.
 

RodeoTex

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Sep 14, 2005
Posts
11,785
Location
Nueces Strip
Looking good eallen.
I built a similar one a few years ago with the same square tubing.
I used the same material to build an 'H' as the base.
Mine is single ended so I have to change buffing wheels, but that's no but issue.
I made 12" wheels too, one is flannel, the other is t-shirt fabric.
It has really made my life easier.
 

eallen

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2013
Posts
2,745
Location
Bargersville/Indianapolis, Indiana
Good insights from all. Thanks for H frame base idea Rodeo. With the motor high one disadvantage will be a high center of gravity.

For those who have or use them what height have you found most suitable? I am a little taller at close to 6'3" and tend to like things higher to accomidate my back issues. Waist hight, chest high, spare tire high? [emoji6]
 

R. Stratenstein

Doctor of Teleocity
Ad Free Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2010
Posts
15,919
Location
Loganville, Ga.
Rule of thumb we use in ergonomics consulting, for tasks like this, would be center the shaft at the height of your wrists with your elbows bent 90 degrees, (sticking straight out from your body, in other words.) That should allow you to buff something the size of a guitar body without having to stoop over (for your back), or maintain static loading on your upper arms to hold the workpiece at a higher position. (About spare tire, high :p)
 

RodeoTex

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Sep 14, 2005
Posts
11,785
Location
Nueces Strip
One other thing i did was to tilt the vertical piece toward me at about 10-15 degrees.
My theory being that it was already leaning in to me as I pressed against the wheel.
I don't know if that made a difference but it is very stable.
 

old wrench

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Feb 2, 2017
Posts
3,114
Location
corner of walk and don't walk
To have the best control (important! :)) when buffing or grinding free-hand (without a guide or some sort of rest), I find it best if I have the buffing wheel or contact wheel set at a height where I can lock my elbows against my sides and have my forearms extended at a comfortable angle. As Stratenstien has pointed out, it's going to be somewhere around 90 degrees.

Most of your buffing is going to be done in a approximately 90 degree quadrant of the wheel. If you look at the "face" of the wheel (from the side or end of the shaft), most of the work is going to be happening in the south-west quadrant. Sometimes you might use the upper quadrant (north-west), but most of what you might do in the north-west you can do safer in the south-west. I use that as a sort of guideline when setting up my equipment. It's much easier to work safely when you are positioned comfortably.

A good buffer has enough power to fling your work in the same fashion as a table mounted router can. You gotta pay attention!!!;)

Best Regards,
Geo.
 

eallen

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2013
Posts
2,745
Location
Bargersville/Indianapolis, Indiana
One other thing i did was to tilt the vertical piece toward me at about 10-15 degrees.
My theory being that it was already leaning in to me as I pressed against the wheel.
I don't know if that made a difference but it is very stable.

Thanks guys for height tips! Rodeo, with it being tilted 10-15 degrees forward, is your motor hanging in the back towards the top like this one or down low?
 
Last edited:

RodeoTex

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Sep 14, 2005
Posts
11,785
Location
Nueces Strip
Man i wish i could post a picture.
I'm in the shop now and looking at it.
The motor is a 1/2 hp and mounted on the front about a foot below the bearing deck.
The cross member of the H is about 2/3 of the way toward the back so most of the feet length is forward.
The actual angle is 13 degrees.
I also mounted my bench grinder on the back side. Not as a counter weight, just convenient.

The shaft height is 36" (I'm 5'10").

Not that any of this is scientific but it has worked very well for me.
Sorry to dominate your thread but this is probably the single tool that made my work more professional than any other.
 

eallen

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2013
Posts
2,745
Location
Bargersville/Indianapolis, Indiana
Man i wish i could post a picture.
I'm in the shop now and looking at it.
The motor is a 1/2 hp and mounted on the front about a foot below the bearing deck.
The cross member of the H is about 2/3 of the way toward the back so most of the feet length is forward.
The actual angle is 13 degrees.
I also mounted my bench grinder on the back side. Not as a counter weight, just convenient.

The shaft height is 36" (I'm 5'10").

Not that any of this is scientific but it has worked very well for me.
Sorry to dominate your thread but this is probably the single tool that made my work more professional than any other.
No apology needed! I am thrilled for the input! I would love a pic if you have one. I love learning from the work of others.
 

RodeoTex

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Sep 14, 2005
Posts
11,785
Location
Nueces Strip
I can't post pictures from my phone, sorry.
BTW, I wish I'd mounted the motor lower. Not a balance thing, just that sometimes i knock the workpiece into it when doing a body. D'oh
 

eallen

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2013
Posts
2,745
Location
Bargersville/Indianapolis, Indiana
Making some progress. I located the motor arm but lower to drop the center of gravity to increase stablity. I also decided to angle the top forward 10 degrees to give more clearance for buffing per RodeoTex great tip.

After a few beads with the mig of my rusty welding skills the motor arm is there for good. I rough enlarged the belt opening to accomidate the lower belt angle. I ordered 3' of link belt I am waiting to arrive.

For a more finished look I am welding a cap on the ends of all the visible tube ends. I am planning to mount the switch in the end of the motor tube where I left an opening so I can run the wiring down the tube and to the motor.

Next comes the base. Undortunately with my tight shop space I am going to have to make something that I can easily move to use. With the weight quickly adding up that will mean wheels of some sort. Perhaps something wheel barrel style.

1510715827636.jpg

1510715834699.jpg
 
Last edited:

Davecam48

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Posts
5,105
Age
74
Location
Queensland Australia
Hi Eric Is the base going to be bolted to the floor? By the look of it I'd guess it will become top heavy and unstable especially with the pressure on the buffer when it's working.

Your welding beats the [email protected] out of mine which all look like rat poop! I've never been able to weld, it seems to just elude me. My son is a boiler maker by trade and a good welder. He has been talking "invertors" lately, are they easier?

DC
 

eallen

Friend of Leo's
Gold Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2013
Posts
2,745
Location
Bargersville/Indianapolis, Indiana
Hi Eric Is the base going to be bolted to the floor? By the look of it I'd guess it will become top heavy and unstable especially with the pressure on the buffer when it's working.

Your welding beats the [email protected] out of mine which all look like rat poop! I've never been able to weld, it seems to just elude me. My son is a boiler maker by trade and a good welder. He has been talking "invertors" lately, are they easier?

DC

Good question on the bolting to the floor and top heavy. Definately one of my concerns. Unfortunatly, it will have to be movable to stowe away when not in use do to my shop size. That is in part why I dropped the motor another 6" to try to lower the center of gravity. I may rethink my options. I tried to be cautious about leg placement not being in line with my buffing wheel. I dont want legs sticking out forward so far I trip over them while buffing & a high speed spinning wheel in my face. [emoji16]

As far invertor welders, I am not real familar. I used to be a certified for aircraft welding 30 years ago but quit welding for 20 years. I have a mig that I like much better than the old days.

I did raise the height after the suggestions of you fine folks. [emoji106] The shaft height is now at a 45", which may be the first time I have had a machine I don't have to bend over to use. I can always shorten it later if need be.
 
Last edited:




Top