Buckeye burl and Mahogany set-neck bass

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by lbridenstine, May 23, 2013.

  1. dazzaman

    dazzaman Tele-Afflicted

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    What he said.
     
  2. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    [​IMG]

    I used epoxy because when I drop filled with CA over the burl, you could tell there was CA there until I put more coats of poly. That might happen with this too, but it was worth a try.

    Thanks for all the quick responses!
     
  3. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    I think you're seeing something I'm not, haha. The problem was the buckeye burl on the edge of the upper horn, not the neck/fingerboard.
     
  4. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    So, as I was scraping the epoxy down smooth (or trying to) yesterday, it started peeling the finish off of the mahogany with it! I pretty much got frustrated and started scraping off a bunch of finish (which scraped off way too easily) and decided I’m just going to scrape/sand it all off, except what’s on the burl, and start over.

    There were a few things I wasn’t happy with before anyway, so this gives me a chance to fix those things.

    I only sanded to 220 this time. I think I did 600 last time and some people on other sites told me that’s too high, but I know other people sand a lot higher and don’t have issues.

    I didn’t like how when I re-did the back (twice) it flattened out the roundover, the heel, and the area around the belly cut, so I smoothed that all back out before putting more finish on. I also decided to skip the Tru-oil this time and just go with wipe on polyurethane. The pictures are before and after one coat, although there was still the original poly covering the burl.

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    Hopefully this will turn out better this time.
     
  5. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    Fifth coat. This was the coat with dye. I think it turned out a lot better than before, especially over the maple.

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    Sorry for all the cellphone pictures lately. I've been lazy about editing so this is the easiest way. I'll get "real" pictures when the bass is closer to being done.
     
  6. orangedrop

    orangedrop Friend of Leo's

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    Yes, 600 is so fine that there is not enough "tooth" in the wood to grab the substrate coats.

    The rule is typically 320, but if you can get away with 220 and not see sanding marks in the dye coats, all the better.

    Also, shellac makes an excellent sealer/primer.

    For whatever reason, it grabs just about everything you stick it to and most everything sticks to it.

    It is also optically clear and when mixed with aniline, makes the richest, brightest popping colors out there.

    I believe the lightest shellac (least colored) is called platina, and next is super blonde, then blonde, and so on.

    You can get flakes at shellac.com and mix your own cuts (weights/dilutions) with pure grain alcohol or denatured alcohol if this is not available in your state.
     
  7. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    It has eight coats now. Do you guys think this is enough? The finish is looking kind of streaky now when I wipe it on.

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  8. fenderchamp

    fenderchamp Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I think that bass would look at home in an art gallery. I admire the tenacity and attention to detail you have shown on this build as well. nice job so far, I think you have reason to be proud.
     
  9. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    Thank you! I'm really glad that I re-did the finish after going back and looking at the pictures of the old finish.
     
  10. orangedrop

    orangedrop Friend of Leo's

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    You are using TruOil?

    How are you applying it?

    You can sand it now with the fine grit or a white Scotchbrite after every several coats to degloss and then add a few more coats.

    I see you did not grainfill the mahogany on the back, not that it matters if it is the look you want.

    A low luster hand rubbed finish allowing the natural grain of wood is an amazing look on an instrument.

    It is impossible to hand apply TruOil on such a large expanse and not have some lap marks.

    Not to worry, because once the finish drys enough, you will want to wet sand it and hand rub with something like 3M Perfect It for a gloss finish, or 3M 0000 rubbing compound for a luster finish, which has a beautiful glow.

    You can also use a product called Rottenstone for your rubbing compound.

    This has been around since at least colonial times IIRC.
     
  11. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    I used Tru-oil at first, but I sanded it off and re-did it with wipe on polyurethane.

    Yeah, I did the open-grain look on purpose. I really like how it looks and feels.

    I haven't had any problems with lap marks on Tru-oil yet. I used T-O for the finish on my other two builds and they turned out fine. Not super professional looking, but good enough for my first two attempts. I just do really thin coats with a piece of t-shirt wrapped around cotton balls and that spreads it out evenly.

    I'm going for a satin/luster finish. I was planning on using paste wax after doing the wet sanding. Hopefully that gets me the look I want. :)
     
  12. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    I am so close to being done with this bass.

    I have a few more things to do, a couple I could use help on.

    First:

    I can't get this white stuff out of the knob recesses. I tried steel wool, but it just crumbles apart and wouldn't get up to the edge, and I tried Q-tips with acetone on them and that just kinda took the crust off of the top but left the rest. Do other people have this happen? I assume it's sanding slurry. Any ideas?

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    Second, my knobs won't tighten onto the pot shafts! I put the set screws in and I keep turning them and they don't seem like they're going in far enough to do anything and the knobs are really loose and don't turn the shafts at all. Did I do something wrong? Or do you think the olive wood I used isn't strong enough to hold the screw thread?

    The other things I have to do are add another pair of magnets for the truss rod cover and drill a hole through the wall of my battery cavity that I can fit the battery cap through because the cable isn't as long as the ones that came with the pickups for my other builds and the wire won't reach around where I want it to.



    So, back to earlier in the day...

    After wet-sanding and steel wool:

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    I was afraid to go too far with the wet-sanding, so I ended up just making it smooth, then taking the rest of the shine down with steel wool, which worked out fine other than taking a long time.

    I polished the fretboard and added some bore oil, which made it look really nice.

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    And I tried out paste wax. I put it on and let it sit for 10-15 minutes (like the can says), then I buffed it by hand, and it turned out like this. Drastic improvement over how it looked before wax.

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    I put magnets in after this picture.

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    Then I installed the hardware and electronics.

    Put some strings on.

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    The back is darker than this, it just came out this way with the camera flash.

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    Total weight: 7 lbs

    I haven't done a setup yet, but it plays nicely. :)

    I'll try to get some photos in daylight tomorrow.
     
  13. TeleSky

    TeleSky Tele-Holic

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    Do the knobs have bushings and set screws? I would think you'd notice if the olive wood wasn't holding the set screws as you turned them.
     
  14. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    Yep. They go in for a while, but after that, they just spin like something is stripped or something.
     
  15. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    Nevermind about the how do I get rid of the white stuff question. I scraped what I could with an x-acto blade, then put a tiny bit of polyurethane in the knob recesses to coat the edges and it turned the white stuff clear. :)

    I also drilled that hole in the battery cavity, and that was very quick and easy, put another pair of magnets in for the truss rod cover, that holds great now, and had to glue the nut back in because it came out right before I did that stuff.

    So, still no working knobs, but other than that all I have to do is intonate the bridge. :)
     
  16. crazygtr

    crazygtr TDPRI Member

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    Take the knob screws out and pour some C/A on the knob's thread, that might help if the threads are stripped, and will make the screws hold. By the way, your craftsmanship is sky rocketing for sure.
     
  17. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    I'll try that! And thanks!

    Edit: I can't get one of them out. It looks like it's stripping the allen wrench, but I used the same allen wrench on the other two after that and those came out, so maybe the set screw is stripped. :-/ I put CA in the other two.
     
  18. lbridenstine

    lbridenstine Friend of Leo's

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    Here are some "final photos" (until I get the knobs fixed).

    And by "some", I mean "way too many."

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    Cleanest control cavity I've made yet.

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  19. Glen Smith

    Glen Smith RIP

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    Another real beauty, Lisa !
     
  20. Jacaranda

    Jacaranda Tele-Holic

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    Nice design, good wood choice - great job
     
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