Bridge Tele Pickup Difference?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Johnny_B, Jun 6, 2019.

  1. Johnny_B

    Johnny_B TDPRI Member

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    I’m planning out my first tele build, found these two squire bridge pickups, not sure which one to use. One on the left is a very early MIJ squire, one on right is MII about 15 years old.

    Can somebody explain the difference?

    [​IMG]


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  2. Dacious

    Dacious Poster Extraordinaire

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    The pickup on the left is a traditional Tele style. It has a copper-clad baseplate and the rods are alnico magnets.

    The pickup on the right, the two strips glued to the base are ferric-ceramic bars. They are iron and pottery composites like a lot of speakers and some newer pickups

    Which sounds better? No-one can tell without listening. The more modern one will probably have more volume. The MIJ one probably sounds more like a traditional Tele.

    I suspect the one on the left is a US Vintage 52. It has cloth covered wires, unlike the stock MIJ.
     
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  3. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    Use an ohm meter to measure the kohms of both bobbins. That will give you an indication.

    As for the magnets, assuming the bobbins are wound about the same kohms, the ceramic will be stronger so you'll want to set it lower in the body than the Alnico to get the same tonal output. The dual bar ceramic, when the pickup is raised high, will give a powerful output like others use humbucker bridge pickups -- hard driving blues, heavy metal, and so on. If you want Country Cleans and chicken picking you'll want either the Alnico about half way to the strings or the ceramic as low as it will go.

    I've seen grown men auto swap ceramic, comically shrieking like little girls the whole time, to put alnico in. Use your ears to set the pickup heights and you can use either.

    You can do the classic test of MIA vs MIM pickups, recording both with the same settings and the same notes if you want.

    Then start looking around for parts to build the second pickup into a guitar -- perhaps an Esquire to keep things simple. :cool:

    .
     
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  4. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've noticed on MIM Stratocaster ceramic pickups, they sound great and have a little more output than the stock MIA alnico pickups. You'll need to try both to see which you prefer. I prefer the stock Fender MIM ceramic pickups, but if you read enough guitar forums you might be convinced that alnico is "better".
     
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  5. Barncaster

    Barncaster Doctor of Teleocity

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    Let your ears do their work and play whatever gear you like. I think one of the reasons Alnico is so popular in pickups is we know a tremendous amount about how it’s different formulas in conjunction with specific gauss levels historically perform in guitar pups. That and there is just a lot of availability.

    As a winder, there is a ton for me to learn about ceramic pickup magnets but there is just not the easy availability of graded material. If anyone has a solid source, I’d love to do some experiments.
    Rob
     
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  6. Johnny_B

    Johnny_B TDPRI Member

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    Thanks for the info! I went out to look for an ohm meter but didn't like the offerings at the local hardware store so ordered one online. In the meantime I am a blues/rock player and installed the ceramic pickup, raised it as high as it could go without hitting the strings, and it sounds pretty good. I also have the confidence knowing i'm in the range of sound that I want to be for blues/rock... Thanks!
     
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