Bridge over troubled water...

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by yanick, Sep 30, 2014.

  1. yanick

    yanick TDPRI Member

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    Hello all,
    allthough I have been playing for over 25 yrs I must admit my ignorance and thus it is with humility that I ask thee:

    How much impact upgrading a bridge really has?

    for example, on my 1987 MIJ Squier tele, should I be thinking about changing the stock bridge (top loading, 6 cheap "T" saddles) for a high end 3 saddles vintage type? Is it a night a day thing or will it only make a minor change?

    Thank you all in advance...
     
  2. sjtalon

    sjtalon Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I wouldn't say night and day. Subtle, but who's to say what that difference is would necessarily be a good thing, or any gain sonically to YOUR ears.

    Component changes are really subjective.



    If you seek different tone ( notice I didn't say BETTER) look into a pickup change, there are piles of very good ones out there.
     
    hellopike likes this.
  3. Peter Rabbit

    Peter Rabbit Tele-Holic

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    In my experience, the main difference between types of metal saddles is in the sustain. The better the contact between the bridge and body, the greater the sustain. I've only noticed a difference in tone when replacing a Danelectro rosewood bridge/saddle with a metal saddle set.

    I personally like the looks of the traditional 3 saddle Tele, but that's just looks. There are supposed to be variations in brightness among different metals, like aluminum is brighter than steel, which is brighter than brass, but any subtle distinctions are lost on these old ears. YMMV
     
  4. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    The density of whatever the strings are attached to/contact with/witness upon determines much of the sonic qualities of a guitar.
    Greater difference in the density of the strings and whatever they are attached to results in more sustain....whether that difference is found in the density of the body, the density of the bridge and the saddles....or all of those variables.
     
  5. yanick

    yanick TDPRI Member

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    Thank you
     
  6. Bartholomew3

    Bartholomew3 Friend of Leo's

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    I've used a 68 vintage bridge and saddles, a 1970 pure brass 6 saddle and a modern chromed brass 6 saddle Gotoh.

    Each one had it's own personality, sound, feel. It becomes a question of taste when changing bridges, you may get what you want...or maybe not.

    I never did an upgrade that wasn't a better move - could be that's a psychological thing.
     
  7. mooncaine

    mooncaine TDPRI Member

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    I had one of those, black, maple neck, made around that time. First change I made was to rip off the ashtray and put on a hardtail Strat bridge I got for $40+ from a music store that was down the street, back when you used to see plenty of music stores in town. Clarks, on Ponce.

    Anyway, it felt and played great for many years with that cheapo steel Strat toploader bridge. I pulled the pickguard off, too, and just left its naked, weird holes gaping open for all to see. It was an exhibitionist Tele, my project guitar, a little too flat-radiused to my taste but nowadays I find that's just perfect.
     
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