Bread With Something Between It Is Called?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by FenderGyrl, Nov 16, 2019.

What do you call bread with something between it?

  1. Sandwich

  2. Sammich

  3. Sangwich

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  1. Jackroadkill

    Jackroadkill Tele-Meister

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    Weirdly, we have a batch loaf here. As in a loaf of bread, not a roll.

    Bet the OP's regretting ever starting this...
     
  2. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Friend of Leo's

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    So do I, but I'm too hungry.
     
  3. OlRedNeckHippy

    OlRedNeckHippy Friend of Leo's

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    I prefer tortillas.
     
  4. FenderGyrl

    FenderGyrl Friend of Leo's

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    No, no...
    Not at all. Very interesting to read everything!
    And pretty happy that our brothers across the pond have enlightened us!
    FG
    :p
     
  5. FenderGyrl

    FenderGyrl Friend of Leo's

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    5 to 1
    Sandwich vs sammich

    :twisted:
     
  6. FenderGyrl

    FenderGyrl Friend of Leo's

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    Who would have thought that a common thread between us all was the different names and types of sandwiches.

    Or sammiches....

    Oh hell,
    Let's include sangwiches and everything from across the pond also.

    Manja !!!!
     
  7. 39martind18

    39martind18 Tele-Meister

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    Delicious!
     
  8. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    sanguine (adj.)
    "blood-red," late 14c. (late 12c. as a surname), from Old French sanguin (fem. sanguine), from Latin sanguineus "of blood," also "bloody, bloodthirsty," from sanguis (genitive sanguinis) "blood" (see sanguinary). Meaning "cheerful, hopeful, confident" first attested c. 1500, because these qualities were thought in old medicine to spring from an excess of blood as one of the four humors. Also in Middle English as a noun, "type of red cloth" (early 14c.).
     
  9. MarkieMark

    MarkieMark Tele-Meister

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    In my experience a proper Po-Boy is otherwise best described as a fried oyster sub or hoagie. And if its fresh quality oysters.... A special treat.
    Even in oyster country, its a good find.
     
  10. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    I used the word appropriately.. if you click on the 'sanguinary' link in your post here's what you get:

    sanguinary (adj.)
    "characterized by slaughter," 1620s, possibly from French sanguinaire, or directly from Latin sanguinarius "pertaining to blood," from sanguis (genitive sanguinis) "blood," of unknown origin. Latin distinguished sanguis, the generic word, from cruor "blood from a wound" (related to English raw, from PIE root *kreue-).


    The word 'sanguinary' in your post relates to the preceeding initial meaning to do with blood. Sanguine is the adjective "Meaning "cheerful, hopeful, confident" first attested c. 1500, because these qualities were thought in old medicine to spring from an excess of blood as one of the four humors."
     
  11. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    ^^^ Oh yes, we are in agreement. I was just showing the "cheerful" use of sanguine goes back to blood.
     
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  12. Fretting out

    Fretting out Tele-Afflicted

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    I hear samwich a lot the same people usually say liberry instead of library

    I have yet to hear sangwich
     
  13. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Liberry -- that's a eye roll
     
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  14. El Marin

    El Marin Tele-Afflicted

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    Nooooope, is a fried squid "bocata". Very tipical here in Madrid (where the nearest sea is at 400 Km :lol:)
     
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  15. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

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    I see.....I misunderstood what you were pointing out. I was aware of the root of the word which is why I chose it in that context.... :)

    I've always wondered why the British have so many positive, cheerful expressions that involve the use of what would generally be seen as negative words.

    Eg. Bloody good! Awfully decent of you! I'm terribly pleased with the whole thing! Etc.

    Do other languages/cultures have similar idiomatic phrases in this way....???
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2019
  16. DonM

    DonM Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    My friend from Cincinnati calls them sammiches.
     
  17. DonM

    DonM Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I’m from Western Pennsylvania and we warsh our clothes, and eat our meals at the taybowl.
    I lived in Louisiana and they axed questions
    And as I mentioned in another post, my friend from Cincinnati ate sammiches
     
  18. KevinB

    KevinB Doctor of Teleocity

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    Growing up in NW England a "sandwich" was often shortened to a "sarnie". Unless of course the bread is toasted, at which point it becomes...well...a "toastie". I could just go a bacon toastie right now!

    Now I live on the South Carolina coast and even though they're really from Louisiana, po' boys rule as there are oysters everywhere.
     
  19. KevinB

    KevinB Doctor of Teleocity

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    Do the clothes need washed and the machine needs fixed?

    I worked with a bunch of folks from Pittsburgh and that's the one construction - a verb followed by a passive participle - that I could never get my head around!
     
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  20. FLHT

    FLHT Tele-Meister

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    Where I grew up in New Hampshire, we didn't call them subs, we called them grinders. I love a good veal cutlet grinder. Sadly, they're hard to find here in Southern California.
     
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