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Brass barrel touching bridge plate?

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by dscottyg, Jan 24, 2021.

  1. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Good question.
    The USA made Fender '52 RI pat pend bridge plate sells for $12 retail and with saddles maybe $29?
    Aftermarket/ boutique brand names get $100 for a nicer version of that $12 plate.
    Many choose Wilkinson to save $2 on the bridge setup and get a cheap compensated saddle set.
    Maybe Fender just doesn't see value in creating a stock # for individual saddle height screws in different lengths?
    IMO they should fit every new bridge with the two E height screws a little shorter, but with each player setting up their guitars to personal preference, no standard would fit every application.
    I like the fact that Fender sells good parts at cheap prices without compromising quality, or at least they make the new bridge as good as they were in '52.
     
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  2. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    The problem, I think, is "economies of scale". I remember losing small parts and a friend or dealer, just gave me some surplus he had. Try to distribute twos and fours and eights of these small screws ends up being about book-keeping and labor and shipping - the cost of making the parts is just about irrelevant.

    Maybe they have ordered the manufacture of plenty of them - maybe if you toured the plant, they'd offer you some if you asked, gratis. But to me, I sympathize with the manufacturer that they could either make money, or they could stop what they're doing and fill orders for 10 tiny screws and go out of business doing so.

    12 years ago, there were still small hardware stores that sold these little screws, in small bins. That's rare, now. Some folks go to estate and garage sales, because there's old stock out there somewhere - the thing is, finding it.
     
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  3. Boreas

    Boreas Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    See #22. They are easily available. But Fender shows them "Out Of Stock".

    https://shop.fender.com/en-US/parts...e-height-adjustment-screws-12/0994928000.html
     
  4. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Those are the smaller diameter allen screws for a six saddle vintage Strat bridge.
    Those stamped steel saddles are notorious for rust freezing the screws in the saddles, as well as rust in the tiny allen heads where sweat and been collects, sits, and eats away at the socket; resulting in stripped heads with the screws still stuck in the saddles.
    Takes a while but old Strats last a while and some of us even play them while drinking beer!

    A major reason I prefer slots!
     
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  5. gsh1968

    gsh1968 Tele-Holic

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    Fender used to supply the late 50s 1/4 inch steel saddles with 2 screw lengths, c.8mm and 11mm. I can't remember if they had 2 saddles with short or long screws now, or if they still supply them this way as it's been a while since I ordered a set.
     
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  6. Blues Twanger

    Blues Twanger Tele-Afflicted

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    Last edited: Feb 5, 2021
  7. shallbe

    shallbe TDPRI Member

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    The majority of my guitars and the guitars I work on for others do not have shims. However, they do have their place for some guitars.

    Recently, I added shims to 3 bolt on guitars with great results. They now play so much better.

    Here is what I use. 3M Double Coated Tissue Tape.

    [​IMG]

    It is a thin strip of very tough 2 sided tape that is often used to mount small magnets. It can be trimmed to shape for any neck pocket.

    Trim it to fit, remove one side of the tape strip and place it in the body. Don't remove the other tape strip. You don't want it to stick to your neck. Screw the neck in place it's invisible, and will not shift around like some shims. Easy to remove as well if needed. Zero change in the tone of any of the guitars, just a better playing instrument.

    The tape with both protective strips is .035 inch thick. It compresses under pressure to .030. When you remove the one strip, compressed in your guitar body it is .025 (25 thousandths of an inch thick). Just enough to raise the end of the neck a bit to match the bridge better. It only takes up 1/4 inch of the neck pocket.

    Just a quick comparison of thickness of shim material often used.
    The 3M tape I like is .025 thick (25 thousandths of an inch). And at only 1/4", it is a thin strip, occupying very little area at the base of the pocket. The length of the shim in the pocket is a big part of the final neck angle, regardless of thickness.

    A typical business card is .016 thick.
    A credit card ranges from .030 to .033.
     
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