Boot Hill 5e3 build

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by notdan, Nov 3, 2019.

  1. notdan

    notdan TDPRI Member

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    Starting on a boot hill 5e3 build! Have a bee box for cab and working on some wiring. I’m following along the stewmac 5e3 guide which has been super helpful. Couple questions so far (see attached image):

    1. What is the L shape thing for?
    2. Where do I use the crimp connections?
    3. Where do I use these plastic bolts?
    Thanks for the help!
     

    Attached Files:

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  2. notdan

    notdan TDPRI Member

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    Also, before I trim these and solder, things looking ok so far?
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Nickfl

    Nickfl Tele-Afflicted

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    The crimp spade connectors are for the speaker. The crimp ring terminals are for your safety ground (the power cord green wire) and your circuit ground reference (power transformer high voltage secondary center tap and filter cap ground usually).

    I believe those plastic bolts are for mounting your circuit board to the chassis.

    The L shaped thing is a solder terminal that bolts to the chassis somewhere and allows you to have a solid place to make a soldered connection, I'm not sure what it is for in your kit though. I seem to recall that @hackworth1 includes a layout with the kits, take a look and see if you can find it on there, if not maybe he'll chime in and clear it up.

    I don't see any obvious mistakes on your board, but I'm not as good at spotting that sort of thing as some others here.
     
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  4. King Fan

    King Fan Friend of Leo's

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    ^^^ what Nick said.

    The crimp-on connectors for the speaker are kinda optional -- some folks just solder the wires to the speaker lugs.

    OTOH the crimp-on ring connectors are UL and industry best practice. You'll need a big (but cheap) wire crimper from the hardware store. Strongly crimped joints are considered better than soldered, because stronger mechanically and better metallic union at the molecular level. Despite this, I solder over my crimps just for grins. Because shiny...

    Re layouts, the Stew-Mac instructions are very detailed, but they may contain a few unclear or just wrong ideas. It's worth getting the layout Dave provides or recommends, and then repeatedly comparing that to the modern gold standard (Rob's latest at robrobinette.com). Then also compare as you build to the original Fender 5e3 layout (Rob shows one with the circuit path and component functions ID'd). And then *also* compare your build step-by-step to the schematic, which shows the 'electron's view' of the circuit and is therefore actually the best map.

    For pictures, post a ton for us and for your own later reference. I'm also not great at spotting errors, but you'll help us and yourself if you can post full size, well-lit (two lamps minimum) pics *inline* in your posts so they'll blow up. You can drag-drop the file into the post-composition box, or use the 'Upload a File' button. And a small item -- make 'em landscape / horizontal and ideally with the filter caps to the left on any overview or board shots.
     
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  5. notdan

    notdan TDPRI Member

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    Thanks for that! Lots more pics and questions to follow. For now working on the cabinet. Can I fill small cracks with drywall compound without worrying about it vibrating into dust and crumbs? Will be under tweed so not worried about looks but have a few low points and cracks between the joints and fascia that need filled.
     
  6. notdan

    notdan TDPRI Member

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    Also see first pic again. The blue white wire... is that the correct stuff to be using? I expected it to be thicker given the 300-600 volts. I also have red white striped I think and black, same size. When to use which? There is also a bare wire, I’m assuming I use that for the ground buses on the robrob plan? Then there is a thicker maybe green wire, any idea when to use that one? (can post pics later if that’s super unclear).
     
  7. sds1

    sds1 Tele-Afflicted

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    Why not get you some wood putty eh?

    Should be some printing on the wire insulation informing of the specs. AWG22 wire rated for 600V isn't very thick. The thicker green wire is possible AWG20 for the heaters, a little thicker because of the extra current that flows there. The bare wire would likely be either bus wire if it's thick and sturdy, or jumper wire if it's real thin and bendy.
     
  8. stepvan

    stepvan Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    If the cracks are going to be covered by the tweed so looks are not important, any kind of filler i.e. polyester body filler,wood filler, glazing compound etc. Could be used. Glazing compound comes premixed in a tube and is available at any store selling autobody stuff. Providing you are talking about small cracks that's what I'd use. Spreads easy, dries fast and sends easy
     
  9. notdan

    notdan TDPRI Member

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    A bit more progress. Does it matter which direction the transformers are mounted? What are the clips around the power and rectifier tubes for? I think I got the sockets in the right direction based on some pics but if that looks wrong let me know. Thanks so much for the help so far!

    Also, if you know of any threads or pages that have some really good pics of completed wiring let me know or good build tips. I’ve found some on here and am reading what I can find but any specific good resources you know of I’d love to see more.

    1FA8BA1F-E1B1-452C-9ABB-A52FEAFB361D.jpeg 7625CFCA-5305-49A7-8876-98A1D761ED01.jpeg 84207A99-3CAD-4775-9E8D-5C311E1AB91E.jpeg A9DCE16A-A855-4EC6-AD85-62A1FEE0CC3B.jpeg 1D5A8D14-956D-4B78-B5D0-269A49FBB883.jpeg
     
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  10. Edvin

    Edvin TDPRI Member

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    No matter witch way you choose to mount the transformers as long as you get the wiring correct.
    The clips is to secure the tubes so they dont fall out due to vibrations.
     
  11. muchxs

    muchxs Doctor of Teleocity

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    Dave sent me a couple of the first Boothill kits a few years ago. I guess he was hoping I'd do a build thread here. I'm not supposed to use the TDPRI to promote my amps and for the most part I'm not going to promote anyone else's amps. I built them up and sent them back. I used as many of the supplied parts as I could and wired them up using best practices and tricks learned by building a room full of these things.


    Try soldering a few junctions.

    It's supposed to be a ground point. That's what it was used for in the two Boothill kits I recently refurbished

    NOWHERE.

    Crimped connections have no place in a guitar amp, not unless you crimp and solder them. To that end poke your soldering iron through the ring of the ring terminals. Slide the plastic sleeve off when it gets hot. Then crimp and solder the connectors.

    "Anything that can shake loose will shake loose sooner or later."

    Those are to mount the circuit board.

    A better way to do it is to use threaded standoffs mounted to the chassis with machine screws. Use shorter plastic bolts (machine screws) to mount the board to the standoffs.

    Use Bondo. That's polyester automotive body filler. Home Depot stocks it back by the glue.
     
  12. King Fan

    King Fan Friend of Leo's

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  13. notdan

    notdan TDPRI Member

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    Thanks for the pics thread, just what I was looking for. Here is today’s progress.

    B305D1D7-872F-4C6A-9170-D9113E587531.jpeg DC6DF5FA-ACC9-464E-8BDF-49DCAE302404.jpeg
     
  14. notdan

    notdan TDPRI Member

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    1F5B20A4-315B-47FF-A56F-554B2D76890E.jpeg 6727A810-BC87-479F-A5E0-15A2602C4F73.jpeg
     
  15. Edvin

    Edvin TDPRI Member

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    I woulda moved the live wire for the fuse to the center of the fuse holder.
    Just for safety.
    Now you can get shocked when you change a fuse.
     
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  16. notdan

    notdan TDPRI Member

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    Wire moved, thanks for that! How much contact cement do I need to tweed this thing? 1 pint? More?
     
  17. King Fan

    King Fan Friend of Leo's

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    Meant to mention, wire nuts are considered bad juju in guitar amps. Vibration anyone? Look up "Western Electric splice" and shrink wrap, or just solder both ends to a nice (isolated) tag strip lug.
     
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