Boomers don't like being called "Sir"?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Cadillac_Mike, May 28, 2021.

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  1. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Sir was never really part of our language here for addressing seniors/strangers..

    Mister, Missus was more of a general usage word..

    If you had been knighted by the Queen we might call you Sir... Military/ex military never carried any extra titles in civilian streets.

    mostly we call people, mate... :)
     
  2. TokyoPortrait

    TokyoPortrait Friend of Leo's

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    Hi.

    It's also cultural.

    Where I'm from originally in New Zealand, it would just sound silly. Because, no one does it. It's like, that thing they say in old movies.

    I'd almost go as far as saying such a degree of formality is seen as distancing and not open or welcoming, & would not necessarily be perceived as respectful.

    Where I live now, the Japanese (kinda) equivalent* is 'san' and it's essentially culturally compulsory. I often get called Mr. Dean, as a sort of English version of Dean-san. It's not really very easy at all for Japanese people to drop it, even using my first name.

    I also often get called Dean-chan, cos, I'm like, cute. :)

    Pax/
    Dean
    * its actually way more complicated that that, but for brevity...
     
  3. Informal

    Informal Tele-Afflicted

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    Never once been offended being called "Sir"

    You'll have to do a hell of lot better than that.
     
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  4. perttime

    perttime Friend of Leo's

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    I wonder how big cultural variations (by area) there are in USA, in this respect.

    In my native language, there's no convenient equivalent of calling somebody "sir" or "ma'm". If you really try, it becomes something much like addressing a superior military officer or the President of the Republic.
     
  5. Informal

    Informal Tele-Afflicted

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    I've heard of women being offended by Ma'am... I would guess mostly because women in general, are more sensitive about their age past a certain point, and the salutation mostly comes across as respect for Elders (Or Military rank as you mentioned)

    I have honestly never heard a man say anything close to.... "That lil sombish called me Sir!"

    Please educate us on Finnish tradition, How would you address an Elder in Finland, without the possibly of making them angry? (assuming you don't know their name?)
     
  6. 39martind18

    39martind18 Friend of Leo's

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    I used to call my mother-in-law "sir," with good reason. she had everything a man could want: heft, bulging muscles, luxuriant moustache...:eek::oops::rolleyes::D
     
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  7. Jimclarke100

    Jimclarke100 Friend of Leo's

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    It has never crossed my mind to worry about it.
    Sir is just a standard polite formal means of address for an unknown male here - mostly you’ll hear it used by people serving in shops and restaurants.

    Not keen on being called a Boomer but really only as it is used in a disparaging way. I’m not... just... by the skin of my teeth.
     
  8. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I think it's kind of nice when someone calls me sir, but it really has nothing to do with me.
    Why are some so formal with titles?
    The last person that called me sir was a Vet trying to get off drugs & alcohol in a 12 step meeting.
    I get that he was trained in a system where that formality is required.
    Otherwise it seems odd, but as already mentioned, might be a regional thing.
    Can also be cultural and vary between different cultures in the same region.

    Seems odd in a way to lump all boomers into a single attitude group?
    Is that a millennial thing?
    Or do all kids today assume stuff about their elders?
    I don't really mind when people assume stuff about me unless it directly affects me.

    Sort of sad for all humanity though when we assume men this, women that, blacks the other thing, boomers something else, Asians some other thing etc etc etc.
     
  9. dogmeat

    dogmeat Friend of Leo's

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    as a "boomer" what I hate is the disrespectful, condescending attitude some of these millennial, Xers, or whatever you call yourselves have. I hear this stuff and I'm ready to go off in their face. trust me, you won't like that... so.... keep it to yourself. you have no idea what we did and what we went through, and btw..... YOU'RE NEXT
     
  10. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'd agree that being knighted by the Queen would be a legit reason to call a man Sir.

    Hmmm, round these parts our mate is who we sleep with, and usually only one at a time!
     
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  11. Oldsmobum

    Oldsmobum Tele-Holic

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    This reminds me of a story from my youth.

    I was maybe 11 years old, and our family was on a camping trip for vacation. We stopped in the mountain town of Sierra City, CA, which had a population of less than 300 people at the time. (It is still hovering around 200 even today.)

    My mom and I walk into the (as in the only) general store, because she needed to ask where to find a phone or something along those lines. She walks up to the counter, and politely says, “Hello sir...” and the man immediately cuts her off, yelling at my mother in a tone that would have him picking up his (remaining) teeth with broken fingers at my current age:

    “DON’T CALL ME SIR!”

    He just stopped short of using profanity. See what phallus head so ineloquently was getting that, is that in backwater Hicksville, he has a name; and not only does everyone know it, they use it. The concept of there being more than 250 people in the world was too upsetting for him to be polite.

    To this day this is possibly the rudest encounter I have ever had with another human being.
     
  12. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    I got called it all my life in my job as teacher/lecturer. I like it as it shows respect. In Singapore they call men sir, and women Ma'am ( NOT Madan as that has certain connotations). Also sales people call men sir as a way of treating you nicely. I'm a Boomer, not hung up and I'm okay with respectful terms, even though I haven't been knighted-Yet.;)
     
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  13. bender66

    bender66 Poster Extraordinaire

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    elbb.png
     
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  14. ping-ping-clicka

    ping-ping-clicka Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    remember be told that I was elderly and I wondered I feel like a depressed 22 year old I don't feel elderly
    I still have a lust for life, yeah , but culture dictates 72 as elderly and that may be so, but I'm not buying into it.
    I refuse to grow up and be a square peg for your square world, It might not be pretty or easy but it sure makes life worth living

    NAME CALLING IS.... (Boomers , Gen Xers, hipsters, etc etc etc etc) an indicator of how deep the colonoscope of media has penetrated your consciousness.




    " Boomers are uptight"

    very classy the generalization of people into groups is the first step of divide and concur , good dog have a brisket

    a poem

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    heal,

    play dead ,

    fetch,

    sit , sit ,

    stay,

    roll over,

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    get in debt that you can never pay off

    buy on credit ,

    struggle to pay off the interest,

    have kids that you can't afford

    play dead

    sit, go to work

    go to work,

    Sit

    roll over

    play dead

    heal ,

    heal,

    sit

    Fetch

    play dead
    bad dog,

    bad dog

    play dead
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2021
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  15. TokyoPortrait

    TokyoPortrait Friend of Leo's

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    Hi.

    Not to mention legit reason for calling a dame a Dame. :)

    Pax/
    Dean
     
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  16. gimmeatele

    gimmeatele Tele-Afflicted

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    I don't understand the terms boomer or millennials, and reading some of the posts it seems a type of insult. Just treat people as people, we will all be better off. :)
     
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  17. radiocaster

    radiocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Watch the movie "Rockers". It's a Jamaican movie, but the concept stands firm. You only call police and judges "Sir". Everyone else is "man".
     
  18. Ess Eff

    Ess Eff Tele-Afflicted

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    'Sir' is wrong on so many levels!

    It makes you sound like you are grovelling and want something.

    It makes you sound smug ie. I'm younger than you and you are an old fart.

    You are not superior to me, even if you are older. We are equals till you/I prove otherwise.

    You have to be very arrogant to expect a title like 'Sir', until you earn it. Respect, is not an automatic function of age. Politeness, sure but you wud have to do some pretty amazing stuff to warrant being called, Sir. More than just being old.

    If you are not a knight of the realm, why wud you expect to be called 'Sir'.

    Etc. Etc.
    :
     
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  19. perttime

    perttime Friend of Leo's

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    It is a different language. Words and phrases don't match exactly. The Finnish way is just to leave out any titles. Just keep the substance of what you are saying "clean". Speak softly and don't use any harsh words. If you want to exaggerate your politeness, there's two versions of the Finnish "singular you": a "normal" one and one that is similar to the "plural you" (which is clearly different from the normal "singular you").

    Even the Finnish "polite you" can give a feeling of inequality which some might object to.
     
  20. omahaaudio

    omahaaudio Friend of Leo's

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    I'm 66 and you can call me Sir any time you like.
     
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