Books, and the re-reading thereof

Oxidao

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I've been always re reading certain books.

First ones in my Teens, translated from English, "The treassure island" by Stevenson (3) and Kipling's "Jungle Book" (3).

Later on, most of J. Conrad's, at least a couple of times each, and some of C. Dickens ones.
B. Stocker's "Dracula" (3). Dostoyevsky's "Crime and punishment"...

Classic American Black novels from Hammet, Hymes, Chandler, etc.
Also James Elroy, Paul Auster, Doctorow, Mailer.

Those above were time ago, last books I re read were "El Quijote" (2), "Grapes of warth" (3), "Les Miserables" (2).

There are many more, most of them from Spanish classic writers like Cervantes, Quevedo, Baroja, etc

The older I get, the more interested I'm in not loosing my time with mediocre literature. I try to play safe with classics.
Around 60% of my readings are Classics.

Around 30% of my readings are re readings.
Sometimes it is because of the story itself, sometimes the wisdom behind the words, and others just the pleasure on rhythm some writers capture on their words.
 
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Oxidao

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I enjoy reading books about the Civil War and the American West. 1860 - 1900. A real interest of mine
I loved, and re read these two:

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basher

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I've read the Aubrey/Maturin series a bunch of times over the years. It's a masterpiece. As with a lot of literature, new and different nuances reveal themselves depending on the reader's phase of life.

OTOH, that isn't always to the good. I still think Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet has some of the most intoxicating prose I've ever read, but oh good lord, the sheer toxicity and pomposity of some of the characters we're supposed to sympathize with, not to mention the great slatherings of orientalism and anti-Semitism. It was a great work back when we were less worldly and sophisticated and kind.
 

THX1123

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I almost never read fiction or re-read anything, but I do go back for passages. The Gay Science or Society of the Spectacle have some real banger aphorisms in there. Philosophical Investigations by Wittgenstein has lots of things to pull out from time to time too.
That DeBord book is good. Dug the SI stuff. Foucault is too chewy to read twice. Plus he makes me feel glum.

Stanislaw Lem might be worth your time.
 

Honest Charley

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I confess that I am a re-reader. Especially books of Tolkien, Woodhouse and of course that old bloke Hemingway. Oh, and I almost forgot Jack London and Kipling!

- Do you like Kipling?

- I dunno. I´ve never kippled.

( Kermit the frog to Fuzzy Bear)
 

Oxidao

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On the subject of lending, do you expect to get your books back? I had an ex gf get quite angry when I asked for some books back, this wasn't an angry end of relationship handing over of stuff, we were still an item and she was dismissively angry when I asked for some quite rare books back. I mentioned this to my next partner and she was of the opinion that when you lend a book to someone you have given it away and to ask for it back is poor form, I don't understand this mindset
I totally agree with you.
I think it says a lot from someone, when he gives, or not give back things. Specially Books and Records.

Perhaps those gf's responses were biased by their particular 'feelings'.
First one perceiving that, as a symbol of breaking the link with you. The next one as a symbol of not breaking the link with her.
I'm probably wrong.
 

Ed Driscoll

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After hearing Mick Taylor of That Pedal Show recommend Mark Manson's The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, I picked it up last year. As someone who tends to ruminate in a very negative way when unexpected problems happen, I found it to be a good bit of self-help advice, wrapped up (not surprisingly, given the title) in a very funny, conversational style. His 2019 sequel, Everything Is F*cked: A Book About Hope has some good anecdotes, but I'm not sure how much new ground it covers in advice.
 

Ed Driscoll

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It’s interesting to reread futurist Ray Kurzweil’s books to see what he’s gotten right about the evolution of technology.

The Singularity is Near is a good catch-all, I’ve revisited that one once or twice since it was written nearly 20 years ago.
It's fun to read old books forecasting the future to see what they've gotten right and wrong. I like to do that with Arthur C. Clarke's Profiles of the Future, and Alvin Toffler's The Third Wave. I was re-reading the latter when it was (briefly) available for the Kindle last year. For a book written in 1980, it got much of the mid-1990s surprisingly accurate, but is looking a bit dated these days.
 

Fritzy1959

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I’m not a big reader, but there is one book I come back to over and over again which I first read in either the late seventies or early eighties…The Diary Of A Rock and Roll Star written by Ian Hunter of Mott The Hoople, chronicling the bands first trip to the States. In my view a brilliant read and it really reflects how things in the world have changed over the years.
 

Greggorios

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Great thread Dan. I always get a lot of wonderful additions to my reading list from this well read bunch of TDPRI'ers. There's also always a few that I'd forgotten.

As with a lot of literature, new and different nuances reveal themselves depending on the reader's phase of life.

I do re-read favorite books and I think the quote by @basher above is a main reason. I'm often surprised at seeing things that I didn't pick up on during the first go around.

I've re-read several of John Irving's books and was glad I did-particularly A Prayer For Own Meany. Same with Arthur C. Clarke. I re-read his The City and The Stars, published in 1956; it was my first Clarke book read at age 10-11 and the one that cemented me as both a big Clarke fan as well as a Sci Fi novel enthusiast. While not his best effort I really enjoyed the trip down memory lane with my young self-amazing how one can time travel this way!

I'll second the recommendations on Robinson Davies and will definitely re-read one or more of the Deptford Trilogy.

I re-read Steinbeck's Travels With Charley recently-it really helped to re-kindle some optimism.:)
 
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edvard

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Watership Down. I've re-read it probably 4 times. I don't have a copy right now, or else I'd probably read it again sometime this year.
I'd like to re-read Ludwig Von Wolfgang Vulture - A Satire by Dolph Sharp, but I don't have a copy of that one handy either.
 

1955

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I wish I had never read certain books like The Ego and his Own, and Thus Spake Zarathustra, though at the time, I thought they were incredible. I was too young and impressionable. I’d read hundreds of books by the time I graduated from college, and I really made a mess of myself between the ideas in those books, and the University.

Now I read only one book, over and over, and listen to it on audio often for hours every day, and all night as I sleep. I have studied it in great detail for many years now.
 

Nightclub Dwight

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I was an English literature major in school, but oddly, I mostly read nonfiction these days.

I do love to reread Richard Brautigan books, both his poetry and prose. I love the imagery he suggests, and the imaginary worlds he creates bring me back to my younger days when I thought anything was possible.
 

dlew919

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Putting aside non fiction books which I re read to brush up on lectures or use for research

Sherlock Holmes. All 56 stories and 4 novels. Plus the apocrypha. (Not a huge fan of pastiches but there are some great ones)

Nero Wolfe. I haven’t read every ine. But I think about 2/3. Too many cooks. Death of a doxy. The extraordinary league of frightened men.

Agatha Christie. Again not all. Death on the Nile. Most poirots and all miss Marple.
Chesterton.

Name of the rose.

Douglas Adam’s.

Dracula (a great book. Fight me or bite me.)

I love getting lost in Patrick white and Morris west. Voss for White. Devils advocate for west.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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Yup. Reading a great book once is like listening to a great song once.

The book I've read most often is Walter Miller's A Canticle for Leibowitz — funny apocalyptic SF.

Sometimes I'll reread something if I remember liking something but can't remember what it was about. For instance, one day I realized I couldn't for the life of me why Holden Caulfield was so depressed. So I dusted off Catcher, which I hadn't read since high school, and had a great time running around New York with the poor kid.

I'll also give books I didn't finish a second chance. It took me five tries to get going on Gravity's Rainbow, but I was glad I did.
 

Flaneur

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I have a hard copy of Steinbeck's short novels. I've worn that thing out.
I bought my first copy of The Plague, in 1975 and it's in tatters, now.
I buy most copies of On the Road that I find, in second hand stores. I give them, to likely, young, footloose folks. It's also an antidote to the loan/'long loan'/stolen issue, discussed up-thread.....

I liked post-apocalyptic stuff, when that seemed like Science fantasy. Nowadays I confine myself to Philip K Dick and occasionally John Wyndham.
 




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