Book for creating/producing a song,step by step with a DAW?

Discussion in 'The Writers' Block' started by braveheart, Oct 5, 2019.

  1. braveheart

    braveheart Tele-Meister

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    I'm looking for a pro level book or "manual" which guides me step by step to the whole production process of a given song/excercise ("project") ?

    that would include:
    -re-recording all the tracks step by step by myself (guitar,drums,keys,bass) with the given plug-in instruments and/or my own guitar gear/gear
    -setting all the plug-in fx
    -mixing
    -mastering
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2019
  2. braveheart

    braveheart Tele-Meister

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    I guess this is great:


    but not yet "it"
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2019
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  3. braveheart

    braveheart Tele-Meister

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    PS:I'm experienced with DAWs and know a lot about production...but that don't mean you can make it "pro"
     
  4. kbold

    kbold Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    YouTube is your friend.
     
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  5. Deeve

    Deeve Friend of Leo's

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    @braveheart Reverb.com's section for pro-audio production includes tutorial resources.
    One of the brand-name author/creators I'm familiar with is Craig Anderton.
    That said, I've still got to wait for my metal-head nephew to come into town to tie it together for me.
    Looking forward to other suggestions.
    Peace - Deeve
     
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  6. braveheart

    braveheart Tele-Meister

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    I don't get that one...(???)o_O
     
  7. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    ... nephew, who happens to be a metalhead, is 'a wizard with computer software' ... probably because he's a kid.


    The keys I've seen: careful placement of the mic to the cabinet speaker cone, mic the drums and drum room to blend, then minimal manipulation in the software. Avoid compressing the compression of the compressed tones (see youtube "the loudness wars").

    Rick Beato has some recording advice videos
    Sylvia (something) has a more hands on recording channel including alternative methods
    How to set up your recording studio monitors for post-processing, including use of noise traps on the walls and ceiling and carpeted floor

    I have found huge improvements in a raw recording in just using Audacity with cleaning up noise, light reverb, panning, and doubling. The more manipulation with a bigger DAW, the more manipulated the sound gets.

    You don't need to spend thousands on the gear and software ...





    .
     
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  8. Deeve

    Deeve Friend of Leo's

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    @jivin248 - Correct, and the "kid" is 35, if I remember correctly.
    He's working on his CPA cert, active in the Reserves and happens to enjoy the heck out of metal.
    We've recently re-connected and we're earnestly trying to guide the musical tastes of each other.
    I, for one, am glad to hear another perspective, even if the cookie-monster vox still don't make any sense to me.
    The lad also has some tech skills and has patiently been guiding my DAW set up, when he's not been busy helping me relocate appliances.
    Yeah, that and sorting through a ton of YT links (including a hysterical metal version of baby shark)


    Peace - Deeve

     
  9. Digital Larry

    Digital Larry Tele-Afflicted

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    Having spent the last month messing around with Linux audio apps, I'll weigh in with my overblown opinion. The nice fellow in the video above says "you won't spend any money. You will spend time. After that you'll be free". That's a lovely sentiment and it's sort of true.

    To the extent that there are cross-platform tools like Ardour, Reaper, Audacity, etc. then you're getting the same features you'd have on a commercial OS.

    There are also some really powerful tools out there, and I used a couple of them quite a bit to evaluate how they might make parts of my life easier.

    #1 SooperLooper - I won't go into it much, but this is an example of a program for which development has largely stopped. The developer still has a forum but there's not much going on there.

    #2 Hydrogen drum machine - works pretty well for coming up with basic patterns. This one does seem to be kept alive by the open source development community.

    I used these just to let me capture riff ideas easily from the guitar.

    I also checked out a lot of other types of apps, and many of them are attempts at doing the same thing, for example a Sound Font player plugin. How many different versions of that does one need?

    I checked out "luppp" - a looper that sort of apes the Ableton Live grid paradigm - but is almost impossible to use for anything other than experimentation as all configuration is done by editing text files. The MIDI mapping configuration is huge and poorly documented. This is an example of a program that had a promising start and then fizzled.

    You can't really tell whether a given app will be a waste of time until you try it. So, if you value your time at $0, then go for it. I value my time at a much higher rate, and I don't always follow my own advice, but 4 hours spent trying to figure out whether or not something works well, only to conclude that it doesn't, is not my idea of time well spent.

    TL;DR summary.
    If you like playing with computers, and don't mind being frequently sidetracked by setup or interoperability issues, Linux might be OK. If you stick with a single monolithic program like a DAW rather than trying to connect things together like I did, you'll avoid some frustration.
     
  10. KCKC

    KCKC Tele-Afflicted

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    Not a book but a great series, "Recording Your Band" by Kenny Gioia for Reaper. Should be applicable to any DAW.

    I have found all his vids really "click" with me. No fluff, gets right to the point and each vid is approx 12-15 min. I believe.

    YMMV,

    KC
     
  11. fendrguitplayr

    fendrguitplayr Poster Extraordinaire

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    Check out Barnes & Noble, I've seen several good ones there.
     
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