Bob Weir isolated guitar from Dead show

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by Boxla, Oct 23, 2019.

  1. artdecade

    artdecade Poster Extraordinaire

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    Bobby is a great player and knows when to sit back and when to take the wheel.
     
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  2. ping-ping-clicka

    ping-ping-clicka Tele-Holic

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    who's Bob Weir?
     
  3. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    One of my faves....this is 9ne Ihave on German Vinyl...
     
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  4. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    There aren’t twenty inversion of a major chord possible. If the major chord is three notes, which it is, then there’s like nine inversions maybe. If you mean voicing, I suppose there could be twenty voicings of a c major if you count every time you omit one note as a voicing. Like playing a c major barre without the root C is a different voicing of a C major, but it’s not an inversion.
     
  5. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    why would playing a G-C-E .....or X-10-10-9-8-8...not be an inversion of a C major chord? Learning I am...
     
  6. Texicaster

    Texicaster Tele-Holic

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    ~9 x 4 = ~36......

    PLUS One could toss in a diminished chord or a 7th etc.... Point being Bob's not playing cowboy chords.

    Did you watch any of it? I'm not a chord chemist so didn't recognize too many on the fly. I'd be curious to know what he was playing.

    I play it straight... missionary position!

    :D
     
  7. Informal

    Informal Tele-Holic

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    God as my witness, I did not know GD used 2 drummers!

    On a recording (To a non drummer) it's about as apparent as 38 specials drum duo...which to me, is not apparent at all lol.
     
  8. Deeve

    Deeve Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks for posting original, isolated tracks.
    I was able to identify a few, wish I knew more (for context) by a set list, but still...
    Pretty nice.
    Peace - Deeve
     
  9. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    Well no, if it's got a fourth note it's not a major chord, it's a seventh of a sixth!

    Yeah I'm being pedantic
     
  10. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    A three note major chord has 4 inversions: CEG, EGC, GCE, ECG. If you have a major chord based on a G shape, a C shape, a D shape, and E shape ("CAGED system"),
    and think about the size of a guitar neck, I suspect the number of possible inversion fingerings is probably less than 20 but more than 9 unless maybe you're willing
    to play way up there near the 20th fret. When maxvintage says 9 inversions possible I think he's trying to calculate all the ways you could play these 4 inversions in
    a physically viable way without crazy hand stretches, limiting oneself to the practical chording range which is maybe up the 14th fret or so.

    Now if it's a chord that includes one or two more notes such as a 6th, 7th, 9th, 11th, etc., suddenly the world's your oyster and there
    are zillions of voicings. If you are willing to do substitutions well then it becomes pretty limitless.

    If you're a minimalist and want to do spare, two note voicings,
    that creates options, too. If I'm playing rhythm with a bass, keyboard, and guitar as found in GD then I'm probably going to be playing a lot of minimalist chords-
    two or maybe 3 notes and that's it.

    The guy that amazes me is Joe Pass. He was able to play the melody to a jazz standard, a walking bass line, and use different chord voicings and fingerings so that
    he could do all three at once, totally seamlessly, totally musically, where all note movements really sounded awesome together. Almost like a Bach fugue or something in
    the way multiple voices moved in a pleasing manner from beat to beat.

     
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  11. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    So a major chord has three notes: root, third, fifth, C, E G. It can have doubles of those notes, like most of the cowboy chords have, but it's still got only three notes. An inversion is when you alter the positions of the notes, so instead of root 3rd 5th you have 3rd root 5th, or 5th root 3rd, or root 5 3, etc.

    If you add a fourth note, it's not a major chord anymore: it's a seventh, or a sixth, or a 13th, etc. So my example was major chords, three notes. A D7 is not a major chord, it's a dominant7. A D major 7th is different from a D major because---it's got a fourth note, the Db.

    A "voicing" is different from an inversion. For example, lots of jazz guy chords omit the fifth. So I might play a three note chord that's just root 3rd 7th. That's a voicing, not an inversion. If I play it as a "drop" voicing, where the root is on the E string and the third is placed an octave higher, that's a voicing, not an inversion.

    Bob Weir is a famous guy who's made a great living making music. I'm just some dude on the internet. But I know my chord theory!
     
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  12. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Chris, the first sentence of your post is what I understand as in versions of a C major. I am still wanting to know why maxvintage thinks that is not the case.
     
  13. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    Yes exactly. And yes Joe Pass, holy hell, what astonishing knowledge of chord construction and also how to make it work
     
  14. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    so why is GCE not an inversion....or for that fact x-10-10-9-8-8??
     
  15. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    I think folks here mean "voicing" not "inversion". A triad has two (*two*) inversions. First inversion = bass note is third of triad, second inversion = bass note is fifth of triad. When the bass note is the root, it is not an inversion and is said to be in root position.

    My pedanticism of the day!
     
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  16. Jim622

    Jim622 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    I'm sorry. I never listened to the Dead, and thought Damn their on Fire!
     
  17. Texicaster

    Texicaster Tele-Holic

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    I don't recall saying Bob was playing major chords... You've been advocating that idea. I'm convinced he's not. I'm sure a lot of it is inversions but since I'm admittedly no chord expert and don't recognize many of those being played up the neck and the single note enhancements...


    The tune was a traditional song most likely composed in cowboy chords
     
  18. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    GCE is an inversion of a c major chord--I never said it wasn't! 10-10-9-8--8 is an entirely different chord, it has fourth note in it, a sharp five. it has a five and a sharp five.
     
  19. Wally

    Wally Telefied Ad Free Member

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    And I hate to keep at it...but IF a chord structure puts the 5th in the bass, why would someone say that it was a voicing rather than an inversion. It is an inversion...and it is a voicing. The 5th in the bass with the 3rd in the second lowest and the root as the highest note is also an inversion...and it is a certain voicing of that second inversion, is it not?
    An voicing is not necessarily an inversion.....as long as the root is in the bass.
    This is how I understand it. I find the last sentence of this quoted post to be confusing.....and confused...unless I am in an alternative universe and need to be brought back to reality.


    If I need to be corrected, please do so.
     
  20. maxvintage

    maxvintage Friend of Leo's

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    So the standard construction of a chord puts the root on the bottom, and then follows in order, so Root, third, fifth seventh, ninth, 13th, etc. An inversion changes that order, so the fifth is on the bottom, maybe, or the third is on the bottom, and the root is on the top. A voicing might be an inversion, or it might be a choice of what notes to omit, or it might be something like playing a C major seven in different positions without inversion. So it could be Cmajor seven not inverted, but in multiple places or with different notes ommitted. So

    X
    x
    4
    2
    3
    x

    or

    X
    X
    4
    5
    3
    x

    Might both be C Maj7s, but one omits the five and one omits the three. I would call that two different voicings

    Technically I suppose the "correct" way to play a C maj7 would be with the root on the 10th fret of the D string, color my world" stylee.
     
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