Blush eraser before wet-sand/polish?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by TelZilla, Aug 25, 2019.

  1. TelZilla

    TelZilla Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,662
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2007
    Location:
    Cleveburg, USA
    Anybody use blush eraser after your final clear coat and before final sand/polish? Not to remove blush, just to sort of reflow/flatten the finish.

    Probably not an issue if you have a perfectly clean spray booth, but I cant be the only hack on here doing this stuff with rattle cans in the garage (patio when the weather cooperates- which it mostly doesn't in NE Ohio).

    I was using some to remove some blush (if its not windy its humid) and it struck me that this might work.
     
  2. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    74
    Posts:
    1,915
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Washington
    I have used blush eraser in an attempt to erase blush (with some success) but not as you describe. One problem is that the only blush eraser I've seen comes in spray cans and I would worry about getting a good pattern for a final coat - I just shoot a wet coat of highly reduced nitro for my last one.
     
    RodeoTex likes this.
  3. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    67
    Posts:
    9,404
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2003
    Location:
    Lawndale CA
    I would not recommend it. Most less-experienced finishers have a devil of a time working with blush reducer in ANY way, since few seem to do enough practice work with it to understand how it's applied.

    It's never sprayed ON the surface, just lightly fogged over the surface and allowed to drift down. Even then it can cause hellacious runs.

    It should only be used if there is a very specific problem to solve IMO.
     
  4. photondev

    photondev Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    895
    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2003
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    I am in the middle of applying clear lacquer trying to finish a guitar body with rattle cans. It had some relatively minor blush and orange peel areas, and it worked just fine for me. Several applications of very light mist did it for me, as other people have suggested.
     
  5. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,551
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2011
    Location:
    Washington, USA
    Blush eraser is nothing more than a specific type of solvent, i.e. for lacquer, it is lacquer thinner and retarder. Usually it has some lacquer in it but it is mostly solvent. With lacquer the solvent softens the finish and allows trapped air (which is trapped inside the finish to evaporate).

    I have never tried what you describe because I have found that using the right amount of thinner and retarder prevents blush, and good spraying technique eliminates the need to "re-flow" in order to flatten.

    What you are asking about is worth a try and you don't need to buy expensive blush remover. Mix some lacquer thinner and retarder and try misting it on a test piece. See how that works out, you never know. I wouldn't be afraid of causing huge runs if you are careful about how you spray the blush remover. As always, experiment on scrap until you get the right amounts and the right feel.
     
  6. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    5,080
    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2007
    Location:
    Glen Head, NY
    if the OP is using rattle cans there aren't many options for mixing your own. However if you do try rattle-can blush eraser, just be aware that the retarder is meant to make the solvents evaporate more slowly. That means the newly treated finish will take longer to dry than the regular lacquer spray cans did. Something to keep in mind before you level and buff. I've never tried it as a way to level out a new finish.
     
    Silverface likes this.
  7. TelZilla

    TelZilla Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,662
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2007
    Location:
    Cleveburg, USA
    I used it without much problem.
     
  8. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    67
    Posts:
    9,404
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2003
    Location:
    Lawndale CA
    And that's the thing about any unusual product use - sometimes a user will get it to work (usually if the conditions are just right), while some experienced applicators and/or industry tech people know odds are low of it working well and it'll take a lot of luck - and preferably a lot of practice if done at all.

    There are all sorts of odd applications and techniques I use that I would never recommend to an amateur. Blush eraser as a leveling coat is one I have used to fix someone else's uneven application - but it takes such a light, controlled fogging technique (you never spray *at* the piece), absolutely precise "target positioning" (to avoid runs) and critical timing that the amount of luck involved (for the average amateur) is way beyond practical thinking.

    Almost anything works for somebody at some time. But I feel I would be doing the user a disservice recommending this use. It's a bad idea IMO.
     
  9. TelZilla

    TelZilla Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,662
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2007
    Location:
    Cleveburg, USA
    Some of us are just born lucky.
     
    photondev and Silverface like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.