Black Hole Sonification. Saddest of all Keys?

Killing Floor

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The black hole at the center of Perseus emits pressure waves that create a sound that humans cannot hear (because our heads are up Uranus) that is 57 octaves below middle C.
Chandra’s team creates some of the most beautiful images and videos related to astrophysics. Enjoy.

 

drmordo

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It's like, how much more black could this hole be? And the answer is none. None more black.

nigel.jpg
 
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aging_rocker

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...57 octaves below middle C...

I've seen the late Robbie Shakespeare play live - I reckon he could get close to that.
Such powerful and low bass that I thought the world was being sucked out of MYanus...
 

JL_LI

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How does 'sound', or 'pressure waves', work in the vacuum of space?

Asking for a friend.
Understanding physics starts with understanding simple explanations so this is the simple explanation I'd give someone learning of the concept for the first time. Sound works in space the same way it does on earth. Space isn't as empty as you think. Particles travel in a disk around the black hole. The disk spins. There are vibrations that propagate as a wave through the revolving disk. The frequency is low, 57 octaves below middle C so the sound is far below any frequency we would be able to hear, but propagated as a wave through the disk, it can be thought of as sound.
 

Deeve

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57 octaves below middle-C?
What kind of sub-woof cabs are needed for that?
Sheesh - Deeve
 

John Backlund

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Understanding physics starts with understanding simple explanations so this is the simple explanation I'd give someone learning of the concept for the first time. Sound works in space the same way it does on earth. Space isn't as empty as you think. Particles travel in a disk around the black hole. The disk spins. There are vibrations that propagate as a wave through the revolving disk. The frequency is low, 57 octaves below middle C so the sound is far below any frequency we would be able to hear, but propagated as a wave through the disk, it can be thought of as sound.
Yes, but.... If a tree fell into a black hole and nobody could hear it, did it really happen?
Screenshot_20200628-214228~2.png
 
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Chester P Squier

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If you take 2 to the 57th power and divide that into the frequency of middle C, which is 255 Hz, you will find that it would take several seconds for one Hz.

I haven't calculated this yet. It might be minutes. Or hours. Or days for one Hz.
 

Killing Floor

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How does 'sound', or 'pressure waves', work in the vacuum of space?

Asking for a friend.
Great question. I was wondering the same thing. Turns out in these regions there are dense clouds of hot gasses that can conduct energy. The video addressed that.
 

Timbresmith1

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The black hole at the center of Perseus emits pressure waves that create a sound that humans cannot hear (because our heads are up Uranus) that is 57 octaves below middle C.
Chandra’s team creates some of the most beautiful images and videos related to astrophysics. Enjoy.


57 octaves below middle c is a silly way for the author to phrase it.
Middle C is 256hz (in the US)
Each octave down represents 1/2 the frequency.
128
64
32
16
8
4
2
1 (this is 8 octaves…1 cycle per second)
 

Killing Floor

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Understanding physics starts with understanding simple explanations so this is the simple explanation I'd give someone learning of the concept for the first time. Sound works in space the same way it does on earth. Space isn't as empty as you think. Particles travel in a disk around the black hole. The disk spins. There are vibrations that propagate as a wave through the revolving disk. The frequency is low, 57 octaves below middle C so the sound is far below any frequency we would be able to hear, but propagated as a wave through the disk, it can be thought of as sound.
This is a measurable wave that is scaled into sound. By definition Sonification is the conversion of data into sound.
 




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