Birds

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Buckocaster51, Jan 20, 2020.

  1. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    Since we moved out of "town" to the "edge of the woods" we have been keeping a list of birds that we have seen in the yard, trees, and feeding stations.

    This past week we added two: pine siskin, and northern flicker, to get us to a total of 39. Not bad for a place that a few years ago was a corn field.

    I know we will eventually go well over that. For instance, we have no sparrows on the list. Not that we don't have sparrows, but we won't check them off until we have positive ID. Sometimes with sparrows, it seems as if there is just not enough to differentiate between two types...they are just "little brown birds."

    My personal favorite to view are the indigo buntings. I would love to see a painted bunting, but they just don't make it this far north very often.

    We are learning.

    It is very enjoyable to play the part of "Mr. and Mrs. Man" and spy on their world.
     
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  2. Bones

    Bones Telefied Ad Free Member

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    My GF is an avid birder, usually gets close to 300 species each year.
     
  3. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Yeah, I watch them a lot here in the woods. I love those Northern Flickers, one of my favorites...
    [​IMG]
     
  4. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    We have Flickers that come to our suet feeder, but th'aint as purdy as that!
     
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  5. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

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    what a fine post. I love watching birds.

    I used to try to name them all, too. Had all the books, tried to teach my young son...

    One day I realized that the bird has a hundred different names, depending upon which language you are using to name the bird. Upon further thought, I realized that the bird does not recognize any of those names, and does not actually distinguish its own species by any name at all.

    I wondered if the Creator had names for them all, or just enjoyed them as wonderful creations.

    Since that day I have tried to enjoy the birds (and everything else I see) without trying to identify them or name them. I am trying to learn to see each bird as "the bird that I see", and stop reaching for the Field Book of Western Birds when I could just sit and watch the bird.
     
  6. Bergy

    Bergy Tele-Holic

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    Its a lotta fun watching those Flickers hunt, prowling through the lawn in the summer.
     
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  7. stormsedge

    stormsedge Tele-Holic Gold Supporter

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    My Mom loved her feeders and watching the birds...I do too. Last year, I had to take down my big feeders because the knocked down seed was attracting skunks (and others). We had four different skunks (we could identify) and as many as three at the same time. Also fun to watch, and all would have been well, but it seems one would always leave a token of passing and it became too much---ppppppeeeeeeewwwwww! Now all I keep is a small feeder with four suet blocks in it. We still get finches, downies, and some others on it. We also have bluebirds (two houses for them) that winter over every year.
     
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  8. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

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  9. KevinB

    KevinB Doctor of Teleocity

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    I have always been interested in birds, and retirement and moving to coastal South Carolina has made me more involved.

    So I now run the bird club in our community and spend quite a bit of my time watching and photographing the many species we have here.

    Last month we participated as usual in the Audubon Society's Christmas Bird Count. The count is done within 15 mile diameter circles and while the recent results haven't all been tabulated yet, last year about 200 participants counted over 12,000 birds in 123 species in a single day.

    Cool stuff!
     
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  10. Dan German

    Dan German Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I enjoy the fact that a move to the west coast has made for more unfamiliar birds to see. Some of my old favourites are here as well. I’m only marginally interested in identifying them; I want to know what they are if they exhibit an intriguing behaviour, but mostly I just like seeing them. I still get a kick out of seeing Bald Eagles in the kind of numbers they have out here (a dozen or more in a tree isn’t that unusual), and my brain still can’t cope with seeing Canada Geese in the ocean. They’re supposed to be in prairie wetlands, not salt water!!

    (My cat has an interesting relationship with the birds outside the glass wall of our living room: gulls, meh; geese, meh; crows, hmmm, this is interesting; hummingbirds... well, that’s when the fun begins. And they will hover outside the glass, looking at her. Drives her nuts.)
     
  11. kingofdogs1950

    kingofdogs1950 Tele-Holic

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    I've been a not very serious (don't even own binoculars) birder since the '60s.
    Picked up the habit from my folks.
    A high point was in Houston a huge flock of pileated woodpeckers (sizeable birds) landed in a magnolia that was right outside my window. What a sight!

    Mark

    60408671-720px.jpg
     
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  12. Bergy

    Bergy Tele-Holic

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    I wish we had those around here, beautiful. Now when you say a "huge flock"... how many do ya reckon? Quite a sight indeed!
     
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  13. telleutelleme

    telleutelleme Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    We get a lot of migratory birds coming through our area and the coastal marshes near High Island attract bird watchers from all over the world. Most of all we get to see predators in the large oaks around the neighborhood. Lots of hawks and large owls working the park nearby. We also get hummingbirds passing through. Our standard fair are cardinals and blue jays and an abundance of sparrows.
     
  14. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    Aren't they a sight? We have one (probably two) that live around here. It seems they spend most of their time deep in the woods. We hear them, but rarely see them.

    I usually tell people they are the size of a crow. Not exactly true, but it helps get the idea across.

    Much difference from downy woodpeckers. Eh?
     
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  15. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    I live in town and have watched with great interest when a pair of Willie Wag-tails made a nest in the rafters of the carport and raised a family there. Lately there seems to be a plague of sparrows which all congregate on my cloths line and crap all over the place. Just think ...............when Australia was being settled by the English gentlemen, they actually imported bloody sparrows because they missed them as there were none here, and they reminded them of home!!!! :mad:

    Then they brought in Cane Toads to eat the cane beetles, and now they are in plague proportions all over the place!

    Bloody Pommies!!!! :twisted:

    DC
     
  16. kingofdogs1950

    kingofdogs1950 Tele-Holic

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    I would guess 6-8 birds, but they were very close and they are big birds. It just seemed like more.
    It was in Houston, near Gessner and Memorial, lots of pine trees and near one branch of Buffalo Bayou.
    Smack-dab in the middle of a 'gated community.'
    Those pecker-woods must have been lost.
    Plenty of wildlife out back by the bayou, including a 4' 'gator.

    Mark
     
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  17. Stringbanger

    Stringbanger Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Another birder checking in. We live a block or so from the river, so I think that helps to attract birds. I would say we have a suburban backyard with a number of mostly coniferous trees. The birding here runs hot and cold, and I think it has to do with what predators are in the area.

    In September, we had a volt of about 25-30 turkey buzzards that began roosting in our pines. So me and my wife would get our noisemakers and whistles and scare them away. Sometimes we’d scare them off 2-3 times a night. Finally, after over a week of this, they gave up coming around.

    We see these guys on a regular basis starting late fall through April.
    DB8091A9-C485-4F7A-BEB9-418530D4FFAD.jpeg
    Also, we see downies, an occasional flicker, and the more rarer yellow-bellied sapsucker. Along with the usual fare of wrens, robins, nuthatches, titmice, cardinals, etc.
    I’ve been birding over 30 years, so I rarely grab the field guide anymore, unless I see something I’ve never seen.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2020
  18. Dan German

    Dan German Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I see those around here fairly often, but it was a real treat when one landed on the beech tree that overhangs my balcony. But a flock of them I’ve never seen. Awesome. I did once take a picture of one of their nests, and didn’t notice until I put the image on my computer that a baby was staring out of the hole at me.


     
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  19. kingofdogs1950

    kingofdogs1950 Tele-Holic

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    My wife and I visited father in law on Lake Caballo, New Mexico one Thanksgiving.
    We could sit out back of his house on the lake and watch the vast flocks of geese and pelicans fly to the lake. I had no idea that pelicans were migratory and passed though NM.
    Quite a sight, flock after flock flying in.
    I always associated pelicans with coastal waters.

    My brother's house is ~10 miles outside of Ft. Davis, Tx in the Davis Mountains. One visit the hummingbirds were passing through. A vast number of hummers. Unbelievable. According to my bro, many were rare and uncommon up from Mexico. I can't remember which ones, but it was a sight. He had about a dozen feeders out.

    Mark
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2020
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  20. TeleBrew

    TeleBrew Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    My wife gave me this book for Christmas and it's hilarious.

    [​IMG]
     
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