Better beginner guitar

Discussion in 'Squier Tele Forum' started by lonepalmdawg, Dec 30, 2015.

  1. revelation2012

    revelation2012 Tele-Meister

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    I agree get the one you are most gravitated to (acoustic vs electric) as you will want to play it more.

    But remember if you go electric, you'll need a practice amp etc and you'll drive your family crazy while learning and you won't be able to practice at night. So a practice amp that will accommodate headphones for late night. as well as a decent cable. That will be added to the price of entry as well as lessons.

    I have been focusing on acoustic for the last two + years and the approach in my opinion is different. I guess not so much approach but how you get dynamics and different sounds is different and influences your technique - electric vs acoustic. I made my biggest strides on playing focusing for two years on acoustic, especially classical guitar. Having just picked back up the electric (a tele) I find myself playing a lot country licks. I never would have figured that.

    But I agree with others if you can swing a Classic Vibe series electric I'd get one of those. They're great and no upgrades are necessary. Acoustic, a Yamaha FG730s or a Seagull would be a good start. No accessories needed but a gig bag or case and a tuner. And you can take it to the park etc.
     
  2. old soul

    old soul Tele-Meister

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    The vms are nice, the cvs are real nice. If you can only get an affinity than so be it! It still gets you playing. As others have said, the amp is going to be an important decision too. I would not go the cheapest route there. Some modelling amps are great, but have a sharp learning curve to find the tone you want and can be distracting with the available effects. Do yourself a favor and play with the amps at the store, and find one that sounds good to you and you can operate easily. Vox vt, roland cube, and fender champion are the ones that come to mind first. The orange 35rt is real good too. Have fun! Let us know what you get.
     
  3. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    A lot of great advice to sort through! I'll add some other perspectives:

    Pay for new strings and a Setup no matter what guitar you start on, this will be the best $50 you spend. Buy an electronic clamp-on Chromatic tuner, the next best $15 you will spend.

    As noted an Acoustic will be more difficult to play due to high string tension and there is no way to turn the volume down. Electrics are more quiet to practice with! You can strum it without an amp or use headphones while letting the rest of the family remain sane. (Of course, when you want to you can go in the back yard and blast the woodchucks out of their holes.)

    As for which guitar ... feel the necks. Notice how the neck sits in your hand and how the carve is done. Some are chunky and some are thin. I listened to all the advice for 'get a thin neck' and it was wrong for me. I like chunky and find thin necks hard to play.

    Look at the used guitars for better value. New from the factory guitars often need as much of a fret level job as many used guitars. A fret level/crown/polish will be about $100 but will include that $50 worth of setup recommended earlier. A good level job can make a $50 used beater guitar play like a $2000 instrument.

    Can't go wrong with a Tele and will recommend you start there (you'll get to one anyway if you keep with playing guitar). A Strat can be a good choice since it can be changed into any pickup configuration you might want: standard three single coils, telecaster style, les paul style, just by swapping pickguards and pickup sets and electronics.
     
  4. lonepalmdawg

    lonepalmdawg TDPRI Member

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    Lots of great advice. Thanks so much. Leaning toward VM myself. The electric appeals to me so I can plug headphones into amp and not disturb my wife or two kids. I'm into Jimmy Buffett, Kenny Chesney, Zac Brown Band, other trop rock and some classic rock.
     
  5. Diamond Dave

    Diamond Dave Tele-Meister

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    Play more quietly? :confused:

    I play electric and acoustic, and I'm glad I started on the acoustic. Personally, I think you'll probably get a better touch and feel for the instrument. There is no hiding behind gain or distortion on an acoustic. Your mistakes and your finest moments are plain for all to hear. Keith Richards agrees with me.

    That said, that was *my* decision. Learning lots of chords and strumming and how to play fingerstyle and those sorts of acoustic things was where I wanted to begin, and I moved on to power chords and effects and pinch harmonics and fun electric stuff later.

    Whatever keeps you playing is the right choice.
     
  6. davidjon_99

    davidjon_99 TDPRI Member

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    A lot of good advice in this thread. Like others have said, hold each guitar and strum a bit on them. If one "feels" better and you think it will be fun to play, then get that one.

    As for learning. I tried learning guitar around 15 years ago. Bought an acoustic and a bunch of books that taught theory and how to read music. I tried going to a couple of instructors. I wasn't having fun so I eventually quit playing and sold most of my guitars. I started trying to learn again about a year ago. I sold my acoustic many years ago, but still had a couple of electrics around. I have no interest at all in playing an acoustic, so I haven't bought another one.

    Anyway, my advice is to have fun while you're learning. Don't be too hard on yourself. Learning to play guitar takes time and is difficult. If you stop having fun, take a look at how your trying to learn and make a change. I hated trying to learn theory, I wanted to just play. And, believe it or not, you can play guitar without knowing any music theory and without being able to read music. I might get strung up for saying that but it is true. If learning theory and how to read music floats your boat, then by all means do it. Just have fun because the more fun you have the more progress you'll make.

    I plan to start going to an instructor and start learning more music theory this year. But I'm mostly going to keep learning as many songs as I can because, to me, that's fun.
     
  7. Mind Flayer

    Mind Flayer Tele-Meister

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    I own both and they are both good guitars, especially for a beginner. If I were a beginner I'd go the affinity and either use the extra $ for a good amp or save it for when you want to upgrade later and you have a better idea of what kind of guitar suits your style as it develops (or just save the $ period).

    If you want to play electric guitar, then start with an electric guitar. They're actually easier to play than acoustics. I don't see any advantage in starting with an acoustic if you are ultimately interested in electric. I know some people disagree with me (Keith Richards included), but I don't get it.
     
  8. Dismalhead

    Dismalhead Poster Extraordinaire

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    +1

    I got turned off of guitar when I was 10 because I wanted to be a rock star and mom got me a classical acoustic and arranged lessons where a guy was teaching me to play Mary had a Little Lamb. Didn't pick up the instrument again until I was a senior in high school.

    You want to play electric, get an electric. If you get into it you'll end up with an acoustic anyways.
     
  9. Tatercaster

    Tatercaster Friend of Leo's

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    If you can afford either guitar, the VM is usually better build quality. Both are good guitars.
     
  10. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    Very good advice.

    But if you want to hasten your versatility talents, then starting on an acoustic is also very good advice. Your hands will get strong faster, you'll probably develop a greater variety and subtlety in your string attack (how you use a pick and/or your fingers on your non-chording hand), you'll probably learn to listen to your guitar better faster, etc.

    Granted, the acoustic-first approach can be considerably more frustrating than starting with an electric, which is indeed much easier to play. But getting good-enough on the acoustic can make the electric's relative ease and special wealth of tones and playing styles something you'll cherish even more than if you had started with an electric.

    Yamaha makes some very good entry-level/determined novice acoustics. But there are many such makes and models worth considering out there--and many threads on this forum about such guitars.

    Get regular lessons from either a lesson-giver, or just a friend whose skills are ahead of yours well enough to keep teaching you things. I'm not sure that you need to know how to read music, but you do want to check out online tabs for songs you're interested in learning. And YouTube is chock full of advice and lesson clips, many of them very good.

    Good luck, and post about your choice(s) and experiences!
     
  11. Tatercaster

    Tatercaster Friend of Leo's

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    Agreed, but you might not ever buy an acoustic. That's what piezos are for.
     
  12. maloburro

    maloburro Tele-Holic

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    Hey lone, wife and kids are just one reason I prefer electric. I too relearned on electric after my first child. I took lessons and owned an acoustic for years, it never inspired me. Electrics did/do (after 8 years of electrics I'm getting excited about acoustics). I understand where people say learn on an acoustic, but they can be loud and at the end of the day, you should play what inspires you to play more.

    Back to your original dilemma. I have briefly owned an affinity and for me, something about that narrow neck was really cool; as people have said, you may not like it. I have a squier 51 which is also a VM model and it's also super cool.

    The last issue to consider is tele vs strat. I used to be a strat guy because of my heroes. I. Now a tele guy, because, well... Let's just say I have 1.5 Strats and 3.5 teles. I gave 2 Strats away and sold one for peanuts. Never looked back.

    Bottom line, both are great starting points, but GAS is a disease. I think you can't go wrong either way. Like Bobby F said, "Two roads diverged..."
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2016
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