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Best way to cut an old tabletop?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by udimet720, Jun 18, 2012.

  1. udimet720

    udimet720 Tele-Holic

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    I have this old table that I am planning on cutting up. It's about 4'x3', just to give you an idea of it's size. It's 1" thick.

    ForumRunner_20120618_091421.jpg

    I want to make one cut lengthwise, i.e. a single 4' cut. What is the best way go do this in order to field a reasonably straight edge? I have never cut something this big.

    I need to make the cut about 1' from the edge. The narrow section will be made into a bench. The other section... Not sure yet. Perhaps a guitar body of some kind!

    The tools I have available are a circular saw, jig saw, and I can ask a buddy to use his table saw if necessary.

    Please advise! Thanks.
     
  2. OpenG Capo4

    OpenG Capo4 Friend of Leo's

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    Probably cut it freehand with the circular saw and then use a router with an edge guide to true up the edge. Table saw would work as well, if you could fit that big slab onto it.
     
  3. Glen Smith

    Glen Smith RIP

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    The table saw will give you the best shot at a straight cut. You could also clamp a straight piece of lumber across the piece and use that to guide a circular saw.
     
  4. nosmo

    nosmo Friend of Leo's

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    ^What he said!^
     
  5. udimet720

    udimet720 Tele-Holic

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    Thanks for the responses.

    I was thinking table saw as well. But, do I need to worry about it tipping over because of the weight of the table top?
     
  6. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'd say you need a person there to hold it up while you hold it against the fence and move it through the blade.
     
  7. Picton

    Picton Friend of Leo's

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    This is precisely what I would do.

    But... that seems like an odd grain orientation for a tabletop. If you're cutting lengthwise, the grain will be all wonky for a bench; is the table veneered? Or is it a particleboard table with a vinyl image on top? That's what it looks like to me...

    I'd think you'd want the bench to be long-grain, not glued up short grain. Same with the tele bodies, come to that.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2012
  8. nb1234

    nb1234 TDPRI Member

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    Yep - I'd say a good straightedge clamped/screwed/double-side-taped to the top and a circular saw would give you a better chance at a perfectly straight edge than a table saw.

    Cutting long stock on the table saw is more prone to slight waves as the fence and table are not (typically) full length.
     
  9. HiggyDude

    HiggyDude Tele-Holic

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    You could just place it on some 2x4's and use a circular saw to make the initial cut - then like some others have said use a router or circular saw and straight edge to get a clean edge. Unless you have a contractor's or pro table saw that top might be too heavy to control. I'm (always respectful) but not usually fearful of tools / making cuts...but something that big and heavy I would take the least dangerous path...
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2012
  10. nb1234

    nb1234 TDPRI Member

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    BTW - a good, inexpensive straight edge are the "1x4" or "1x6" pieces of MDF they stock at HD/Lowes. Much truer than dimensional lumber, and won't warp like even plywood can from time to time.
     
  11. Picton

    Picton Friend of Leo's

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    Yes. Or I was thinking masonite...
     
  12. crazydave911

    crazydave911 Doctor of Teleocity

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    As long as your mentioning Home Depot, just ask them if they will cut it on their panel cutter. My local HD charges 2$ a cut, as long as you make a purchase ;)
     
  13. bubba105

    bubba105 Tele-Meister

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    http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-T...lls/two-essential-saw-cutting-guides/View-All

    Go to figure A. Every woodshop should have these in a couple of different sizes because the long one can be unwieldy on a shorter cut. When you use the factory edge and, most importantly, a sharp blade, you'll be amazed at the accuracy of your cuts. I have a Forrest blade that leaves a crosscut edge that feels like it was sanded. I keep a lesser blade on the saw in case anyone (the bride) decides to borrow the saw to cut stupidity.

    http://www.forrestsawbladesonline.com/category_2_Woodworker_II.html?gclid=CJ6qyLjF2rACFUZN4AodDDvq2g
     
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