Best vehicle for a cross country road trip?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by CharlieO, Sep 11, 2020.

  1. goonie

    goonie Friend of Leo's

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    That white wagon looks like a nice ride. Not many wagons around these days now that the SUV madness has gripped the populace. We have two wagons in our family but neither are sold in the US! I have a Ford Mondeo (Fusion in the US) diesel wagon. Big, comfy, economical and eats up the miles. And handles like a car. My wife's Subaru Levorg (WRX wagon) beats it for fun though and has all wheel drive grip.
    How about a 3-4yo E series wagon?
    MercedesBenzE400Wagon001.jpg
     
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  2. cenz

    cenz Tele-Meister

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    1970 440 Challenger. 4 spd. White. Call yourself Kowalski.

    Seriously, If you get a chance, check with Enterprise. You can get a low mileage whatever you may need, in excellent mechanical condition for cheaper than any dealer.

    I’ve done several Minnesota to Philly and back trips in my wife’s Charger. V6, 5 spd auto. 70-80 all day. 33 mpg, per the cars computer. Works out to 550-600 miles a tankful. Tops out at 125 mph+.
     
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  3. GuitarsBuicks

    GuitarsBuicks Tele-Afflicted

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    I disagree from experience. I had breaks go out on an Astro Van, a Buick Park Ave, a Buick Lesabre Limited, a Ford Econoline E-150, A 2017 Dodge Caravan and a Mercury Grand Marquis, none of them had brakes after the line broke anywhere in the system. (Turns out the Merc had no functional e-brake either...thank god that wasn't on a road trip. we had just gotten back with that car three days earlier. It was a long 6 miles to my grandfathers house.) Unlike when the line went in the Wagon where I was able to use regular the brakes like nothing had happened for over 30 miles until I could stop and fix them.

    I also disagree with turning out black walls. White-letter tires make anything look sporty! Especially station wagons.
     
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  4. DrPepper

    DrPepper Friend of Leo's

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    Ford Crown Victoria
     
  5. Telecastoff1

    Telecastoff1 Tele-Afflicted

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    GMC Yukon. Very comfortable. Good mileage for a big SUV.
     
  6. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Poster Extraordinaire

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    What on earth could have caused your brakes to go out on so many different vehicles?
    I’ve never had the brakes go out on any car I owned or rented, never .
    I’ve seen people drive until the brake pads, rotors, everything worn through, but they still stopped the vehicle, eventually.
     
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  7. Anacharsis

    Anacharsis Tele-Holic

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    Depends on what you like to drive. I deeply dislike driving SUVs, and would go with a station wagon.
     
  8. rz350

    rz350 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    That is my question, why so many brake failures, doesn't seem right...
     
  9. Sequimite

    Sequimite Tele-Meister

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    I've done a Florida to Washington state drive a couple of times in diesel pickup trucks. Great for mountains and good for sleeping in the cab.

    I bought a Subaru Forester for future trips. Not as good in the mountains (barely have to brake descending in the diesels) but better in the snow.
     
  10. GuitarsBuicks

    GuitarsBuicks Tele-Afflicted

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    New York winters plus 20 year old metal brake line. The 17 is still a mystery, but it happened. Wasn't my vehicle. The rest are all 15+ years old, so 15+ years worth of rust and dry rot on the rubber parts, plus small mountains on a daily basis. Salt eats metal like some people drink alcohol. Its also always wet, even when it's dry.

    When I was in college (2015) I saw a brand spanking new chevy truck (2014) with rusted out brake lines.

    Only two new vehicles in my entire families driving history, and that was 35 years ago, before my parents even met.
     
  11. GuitarsBuicks

    GuitarsBuicks Tele-Afflicted

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    To be fair I'm talking about brake lines, not pads and rotors
     
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  12. MarkieMark

    MarkieMark Friend of Leo's

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    Despite your experience, while performance after a hydraulic fault may vary wildly- dual circuit brake systems were mandated in 1967.

    http://www.auto-repair-help.com/aut...ylinders used with disc,as the disc pads wear.

    And while it is a matter of taste and opinion, unless one is 16 yrs old, the white letter tires on that car are out...
     
  13. getbent

    getbent Telefied Gold Supporter

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    I think he is a mechanic.
     
  14. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Ok, brake lines are either metal tubing or reinforced rubber.
    Now there may be some confusion because of the term brake lining. Brake lining is actually an antiquated term used to describe the brake shoes. Like disc brakes in the front and conventional or shoe brakes in the rear.
    But in your case you’re talking about the brake lines, which again are metal tubing or reinforced rubber.
    If you’re having any issues at all with the brake lines, someone is trying to kill you. People cut small holes in the brake lines and you take off and every time you push the brake pedal, you force brake fluid out of the hole or cut. You will soon push out most of the brake fluid and the brake will not function.
    I have driven millions of miles in 55 years and never replaced a brake line. There is nothing about the metal tube that wears.
    So not to sound like a smart ass, if you have had issues with the brake lines on one car would be rare, but a half a dozen cars? Very suspicious, someone may in fact be trying to hurt you.

    So, if you and I go get a beer, we’ll take my car:D
     
  15. Torren61

    Torren61 Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

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    Check with Hertz directly. Don’t go through a third party.
     
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  16. MarkieMark

    MarkieMark Friend of Leo's

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    True in SoCal. Not in the rust belt.
    Rusted out brake lines has been a major problem for decades in places like NY, PA, OH, etc, and increased by about 300% when states switched from rock salt/sand to brined chemical treatment.
    My shop has replaced hundreds of sets in the last decade. Some brands being so prone as to make us know just where to look on every visual inspection.
     
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  17. boredguy6060

    boredguy6060 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I must confess that I didn’t consider rusting brake lines because as you said, we don’t have rust here.
    So if in fact rusting brake lines is a common occurrence.
    Makes me wonder why stainless is not used or some coating, but if you say rust is the culprit then we’ll have to conclude that the OP has had multiple incidents where his brake line rusted through and caused his brakes to fail.
     
  18. telepraise

    telepraise Tele-Afflicted

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    For a trip of that distance, I'd have two criteria:
    1- safety, your chances of dying on the highway are greater than just about anywhere else.
    2- seat quality, with lots of long days on the road back to back, you need seat that fits you well and has good lumbar support or rigor mortis will be settling in.

    I found both of these in a Toyota Highland which is rock solid on the highway and good for camping out of, though you can't sleep the night in it as the seats don't fold to a flat deck. The 300,000 mile lifespan is a nice side benefit. I think one of the nicest benefits of a crossover SUV is sitting two feet taller and being able to see what's happening up the road.
     
  19. BobbyZ

    BobbyZ Doctor of Teleocity

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    Rusted metal brake lines are definitely a problem here! Road salt will do that. Most of the brine we use is just that, brine, we take the same rock salt and dump it in a DoHicky that runs water over it to make the brine. When you put salt on ice it forms a brine anyway, so there's no real difference in corrosion. However there are some different liquids used now, I haven't used those yet.
    What has happened is the amount of salt used. It used to be you'd get the roads sorta clean and let nature take it's course. Now they want them completely de-iced ASAP. Same folks that complain about rust, complain if the roads are icy at all.
     
  20. BobbyZ

    BobbyZ Doctor of Teleocity

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    13584841_1798136287073061_4440525295182874504_o.jpg Almost forgot I still have this ultimate cruiser.
    1966 Volvo 122S Estate Wagon. It's got the two liter B20 engine upgrade, (most of that motor came out of a boat) and I upgrade from an M40 transmission to an M41 with the J type overdrive. Last upgrade was the best, the old B18 ran fine and had plenty of power. The overdrive with the 4.56 rear gears just made it a lot quieter at highway speed. Probably picked up some MPG too but the odometer stopped working years before I got it.
    Yeah baby this is the car for cross country trips. No AC but four windows roll down, you got the wing windows and the vent. Heater works great too, a little breezy due to rotten window gaskets, but you don't freeze to death.
    I should start driving it again.
     
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