Best resources to learn about amp repair?

NashvilleDeluxe

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
May 10, 2007
Posts
1,060
Location
West Island, Quebec
Hello, all! I have a busy guitar/bass repair shop, but get a lot of inquiries about repairs on tube amps. Do you think guitar/amp repairs have complementary skill sets, or are they totally distinct, like car repair vs. body work/paint?
It seems that the amp wizards around my area are either busy (ie. unresponsive) or retiring, so I'm just wondering out loud about the feasibility of it. Thoughts?
 

SnidelyWhiplash

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Jun 18, 2009
Posts
4,437
Location
Hoggtown, KY.
If you don't mind print, there are the old standbys. Jack Darr. Antique Radio repair manuals. The RCA tube receiving manual. You don't have to be an EE to work on amps, but learning the basics on how tube amps work can only benefit you in the long run.

Be careful about poking around a live amplifier. You can get a nasty shock. The bigg amps can kill you.
 

dan40

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Aug 19, 2015
Posts
2,731
Location
Richmond Va
The experience you have gained working on guitar electronics will definitely help as you have already learned some of the basics such as soldering, resistance readings and wiring in tight quarters. I started with an interest in learning to work on my guitars years ago which eventually led to learning how to repair my amps and building new ones.

One of our members has a great sight on tube amp basics you should check out.

 

Mike H.

Tele-Afflicted
Gold Supporter
Joined
May 19, 2003
Posts
1,420
Age
67
Location
Collierville, TN
You need to have a working knowledge of electronics before working on amp circuits. And even if you went and got a 2-year electronics degree, you wouldn't learn anything about tubes.
The best way to learn is to work with someone who already knows tube amps inside and out. And of course, there's the usual caveat that working on tube amp circuits can be dangerous.
Even an unplugged tube amp can hold potentially lethal stored charges.
 

NashvilleDeluxe

Tele-Afflicted
Joined
May 10, 2007
Posts
1,060
Location
West Island, Quebec
You need to have a working knowledge of electronics before working on amp circuits. And even if you went and got a 2-year electronics degree, you wouldn't learn anything about tubes.
The best way to learn is to work with someone who already knows tube amps inside and out. And of course, there's the usual caveat that working on tube amp circuits can be dangerous.
Even an unplugged tube amp can hold potentially lethal stored charges.
Excellent advice, sir. I already take in amps to do the "troubleshooting" stuff and biasing, but I wanted to get some ninja skills in the advanced areas. We're just finding that when I refer a customer to an amp tech around here, it's a 4-6 month wait. Plus, I love learning new skill sets. This Two-Rock head came in yesterday, and we got it up and running again.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_2040.JPEG
    IMG_2040.JPEG
    216 KB · Views: 10
  • IMG_2046.JPEG
    IMG_2046.JPEG
    168.3 KB · Views: 9




Top