Best Online Country Guitar Course

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by dcupright, Jul 17, 2019.

  1. dcupright

    dcupright TDPRI Member

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    20
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2018
    Location:
    Kentucky
    i am a long time bass player/ acoustic guitar( strummer ) looking to get into playing country lead and backup. What are some good online sources to get there in 2019, I have very little lead experience so nothing too advanced.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. twangjeff

    twangjeff Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,164
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    I would suggest starting with learning songs and then start fleshing that out with theory/technique. Start with the Merle Haggard/ Buck Owens stuff. A lot of the James Burton/Roy Nichols/Don Rich stuff is musically interesting, but not at all technically demanding. It's all stuff that pretty much any beginner guitar player should be able to play.

    Ken Carlson, who I believe is a member here, has a great site that breaks down songs and shows the signature parts. That is where I would start.
     
    McGlamRock likes this.
  3. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    7,516
    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2013
    Location:
    Indiana
    youtube

    and its playback speed adjustment options

    first position stuff:

    Luther Perkins
    Lester Flatt's run

    then learn neighboring major triad inversions on the top three strings

    figure out the most common country bends: there are a few to get right away

    play around with this stuff till you can do it in your sleep

    then major and minor pentatonic scales, once you visualize how they move you through chord shapes

    this will give you the fretboard foundation for learning the common vocabulary

    learn *songs*
     
  4. McGlamRock

    McGlamRock Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,111
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
  5. eclipse

    eclipse Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    258
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    Location:
    U.K.
  6. G-52

    G-52 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    61
    Posts:
    318
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2017
    Location:
    Denver, Co
    Jason Loughlin @Truefire.com:)
     
  7. Crowcaster

    Crowcaster Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    534
    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2010
    Location:
    North Dakota
    sixstringcountry.com

    Theory and Song lessons.

    $10/month, but look for a coupon giving you the first month free.
     
    Texicaster and Don Miller like this.
  8. Texicaster

    Texicaster Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    643
    Joined:
    May 9, 2018
    Location:
    Arizona
    I'm digging the Redd Volkeart lessons on Truefire!

    Very usable examples and broken down to bite sized chunks. I'm only 4 or 5 in and practice a little every day.

    I tried Guthrie Trapp on Artistsworks and while some cool techniques and decent instruction his feed back was weak. BUT good break down of Luther Perkins approach. Just too expensive compared is my only real gripe.

    I'm still looking for more...

    TEX
     
    G-52 likes this.
  9. dcupright

    dcupright TDPRI Member

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    20
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2018
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Thanks for the suggestions, Ken Carlson looks promising as does six string country, I have done some Tru Fire on bass but will look at the guitar offers
     
  10. strat56

    strat56 Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    665
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2008
    Location:
    Elkton,MD
    I agree with this, both learning songs and Ken Carlson. Ken has a bunch of songs hes done tutorials for and also has general lessons, https://countryguitarchops.com/

    Another guy to check out is Jim Lill, https://jimlillmusic.com/
     
  11. Toast

    Toast Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    609
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2019
    Location:
    Scootchin' Over
    I find a lot of these Fretjam videos helpful for starting down the lead guitar path.

     
  12. Junkyard Dog

    Junkyard Dog Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    45
    Posts:
    1,437
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2016
    Location:
    USA
    I've had good experiences with subscriptions (i.e. streaming content) to Six String Country and Country Guitar Chops. Also have purchased (i.e. download and keep forever) Truefire lessons from Bill Kirchen and Jason Loughlin.

    I'd have a hard time saying which is the best, and not sure it would matter anyway, as what might be best for me might not be best for you.

    But all three are very good and have been recommended by others here in the thread. I think they each offer a free trial period, so I suggest checking each out and seeing which has the techniques, songs, etc. that most appeal to you.
     
  13. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,888
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2018
    Location:
    In space with Ziggy
    I don't know of any but Finger Pickin Good would be a great name for a country guitar course.
     
    Fretting out likes this.
  14. dcupright

    dcupright TDPRI Member

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    20
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2018
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Thanks for all of the helpful replies, I am going to give six string country and country guitar chops a try and see where it takes me. They are both inexpensive enough to give them a try
     
  15. Matt G

    Matt G Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,116
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2012
    Location:
    Australia
    Late to the party, but I'd second the Jason Loughlin material at Truefire (perhaps starting with Country Guitar Survival Guide - Lead, which is exactly what you seem to be looking for). He also posts here from time to time.
     
  16. dcupright

    dcupright TDPRI Member

    Age:
    64
    Posts:
    20
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2018
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Thanks for the suggestion, Jason looks like someone to ck out. The nice thing is they are all inexpensive enough to give them a try and see what fits the best.

    I ran across a site called Guitar Compass

    http://guitarcompass.com/

    It looks like it is about the right speed for me, does anyone have any experience with this site?
     
  17. Wallaby

    Wallaby Tele-Meister

    Age:
    55
    Posts:
    259
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2018
    Location:
    Midwest
    I liked the Ken Carlson courses a lot.
     
    Texicaster likes this.
  18. galen

    galen TDPRI Member

    Age:
    68
    Posts:
    29
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2016
    Location:
    Union Hall, Va
    It’s already been said, but it is worth repeating. I have gained significant progress in and great understanding of country lead via Ken Carlson and Jason Loughlin. Their approaches and explanations are a bit different, but they are gold. The rest is blood, sweat, and tears.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  19. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,428
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Location:
    Charlotte NC
    while I would certainly agree that learning from any of the materials mentioned is a very good thing, BUT learning to play IN A COUNTRY band is equal to or more important than what we actually play. The internal orchestration of the instruments is of premium importance. This is where many really fine Guitar , Bass, Steel , Drums and Keyboard players fall short. They know how to play great licks, AND DO. Non stop.

    The simplicity of Country Music along with the skilled solo's and fills is what makes playing Country Music so difficult to play correctly. Especially when there may be two or three different lead Instruments. The "unwritten " rules of orchestration far outweigh the skills of soloing.

    Country music is perceived as very easy to play, and it is but it's much easier to play it POORLY than it is properly.

    While studying the materials mentioned above, start listening to every Alan Jackson song known to mankind, not for the songs, but for the interaction of instruments. Not for Brent Masons solos', but when he plays and when he doesn't. Not for the great Steel or Fiddle solos' but when they are not even touching the strings. I use Alan Jackson songs as a reference as this is a complete band with full orchestration of our individual Instruments. A lesson on when to play and when NOT to play. Its not about the songs, its about the song construction, whats going on internally.

    This I can guarantee, being a country Steel and Guitar player for over 40 years, it took the first 20 years to figure it out, then the next 20 were spent with other players who still have not figured it out. Once we cross over and "figure it out", when we are on a gig with other players, it will take less than half of the first song to know who gets it and who doesn't, and it has nothing to do with how many great licks they know. They end up in the "TOO BUSY" or "NEVER STOPS PLAYING" category.

    The "outline" for playing Country Music is simple and clear , regardless of the artist. The skill set of the players is extremely important and fun, but the skill set to know when NOT to play is more important then what we can actually play.

    good luck ! Learn to play, but more importantly, learn when NOT to play. The more you know when "NOT TO PLAY" will keep you busy for years as opposed to " he's a great player who never stops playing great " ! :)
     
    archtop_fjk, DSharp, matrix and 2 others like this.
  20. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,428
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Location:
    Charlotte NC
    I don't mean to hog this discussion but I did just have this discussion with a friend with regard to playing Country and soloing. I suspect the materials listed above will be similar in structure, I hope so.

    As players we play ( solo) out of at least 3 modes, or at least we should. Mel Bay calls them Form 1, 2 and 3 . I may have them mixed up but here goes.

    Form 1, we barr an A chord across the 5th fret, this is a home position for us when are playing Blues and Rock, it's ok for Country'ish licks but limited, more of a Melody position. This is the position we all started playing guitar with. Louie Louie, all Blues solos, Chuck Berry etc...

    Form 2, we play an "A" chord at the 2nd fret. Its an excellent position for country licks, even considered a HOME position. Its the Honky Tonk Woman position. We all know this I think.

    Form 3, "A" chord up on the 9th Fret position. This is where the meat is. Form 3. I suspect many of the leading "country pickers" use this as their root, home position. Think Marty Stuart. with this form the interaction between the 1,4,and 5 chord shapes is "magical".

    The most famous solo's come from a mix of Form 2 and 3, or vice versa, Form 3 and Form 2. While Form 1 is available it's more of a passing thru it kinda thing. Many guitar players who are not versed ( practiced) in all 3 forms can find themselves searching or playing limited solo's. All 3 are very important.

    Country Music is based on the I,IV and V or the I,II,IV and V progressions, not all but MANY. Many many ! The 3 different position have those formats right in front of us on the fretboard without moving away form the pocket. I find position 3 to be the most accessible for each of the chord shapes, position 2 to be next and position 1 to be the least used for the varied shapes. While studying, I would recommend getting those shapes implanted into auto pilot.

    While studying any program I would just recommend, that if the program teacher is not separating the 3 forms into the defined positions, do it on your own. Define the positions on your own. Its not magic it's just guitar playing . If we look at the fretboard in at least 3 Home positions , we may not play the right notes each time out but we will at least know we are in the right place !

    And in closing, if we happen to be playing on a B Bender, form 3 is the first go to MEAT position, , form 2 the 2nd most useful and form 1 the least used position, not to imply that it is not used, but the least. This of course is just my opinion.

    just my take on the matter.
     
    suthol and JimInMO like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.