Best of Post-punk

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by Neener, Feb 24, 2020.

  1. Xtyfighterx

    Xtyfighterx Tele-Meister

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    Strike anywhere
     
  2. Ess Eff

    Ess Eff Tele-Holic

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    Hmmmm... no one says Green Day?
    .
     
  3. Fendereedo

    Fendereedo Poster Extraordinaire

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    So many bands came after punk, however there are a good few that I like that were directly after. All are British, or Irish though.
    Joy Division.
    Wire.
    Gang of four.
    Public Image LTD.
    The Cure.
    Virgin Prunes.
    Early U2.
    A Certain Ratio.
    Caberet Voltaire.
     
  4. Fendereedo

    Fendereedo Poster Extraordinaire

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    More mid 90s punk revival, than post punk.
     
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  5. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    *Suicide*

    RIP Alan Vega

     
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  6. Fendereedo

    Fendereedo Poster Extraordinaire

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    I once saw them at a venue in London, and it turned into a total riot. The venue got totally trashed, along with Suicides PA and equipment.
     
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  7. Neener

    Neener Tele-Holic

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    I’ll be honest I never gave PiL a chance, Johnny rotten always annoyed the bleep out of me. But digging the first record so far.
     
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  8. Fendereedo

    Fendereedo Poster Extraordinaire

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    Metal box/Second edition is an album in my top 10 of all time. The first one is great though. I thought PIL lost it after Album though.
     
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  9. Neener

    Neener Tele-Holic

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    If I can add to the list, recently discovered “Cleaners from Venus.” They (he) was super prolific. You can find a bunch of their DIY tapes on Spotify. Takes some digging but there are some gems.
     
  10. Neener

    Neener Tele-Holic

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    Just scanning through their records, really dig “first issue”. Then seemingly gets more and more experimental. I’ll definitely give PiL a deeper listen
     
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  11. Stringbanger

    Stringbanger Telefied Ad Free Member

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    From The Wick:

    Post-punk is a diverse genre[6] that emerged from the cultural milieu of punk rock in the late 1970s.[1][7][8][9][nb 1] Originally called "new musick", the terms were first used by various writers in the late 1970s to describe groups moving beyond punk's garage rock template and into disparate areas.[2] Soundswriter Jon Savage already used "post-punk" in early 1978.[11] NME writer Paul Morley also stated that he had "possibly" invented the term himself.[12] At the time, there was a feeling of renewed excitement regarding what the word would entail, with Sounds publishing numerous preemptive editorials on new musick.[13][nb 2] Towards the end of the decade, some journalists used "art punk" as a pejorative for garage rock-derived acts deemed too sophisticated and out of step with punk's dogma.[15][nb 3] Before the early 1980s, many groups now categorized as "post-punk" were subsumed under the broad umbrella of "new wave", with the terms being deployed interchangeably. "Post-punk" became differentiated from "new wave" after their styles perceptibly narrowed.[17]

    Nicholas Lezard described the term "post-punk" as "so multifarious that only the broadest use ... is possible".[6]Subsequent discourse has failed to clarify whether contemporary music journals and fanzines conventionally understood "post-punk" the way that it was discussed in later years.[18]Music historian Clinton Heylin places the "true starting-point for English post-punk" somewhere between August 1977 and May 1978, with the arrival of guitarist John McKay in Siouxsie and the Banshees in July 1977, Magazine's first album, Wire's new musical direction in 1978 and the formation of Public Image Ltd.[19]Music historian Simon Goddard wrote that the debut albums of those bands layered the foundations of post-punk.[20]

    Simon Reynolds' 2005 book Rip It Up and Start Again is widely referenced as post-punk doctrine, although he has stated that the book only covers aspects of post-punk that he had a personal inclination toward.[1]Wilkinson characterized Reynolds' readings as "apparent revisionism and 'rebranding'".[18] Author/musician Alex Ogg criticized: "The problem is not with what Reynolds left out of Rip It Up..., but, paradoxically, that too much was left in".[1][nb 4] Ogg suggested that post-punk pertains to a set of artistic sensibilities and approaches rather than any unifying style, and disputed the accuracy of the term's chronological prefix "post", as various groups commonly labeled "post-punk" predate the punk rock movement.[1]Reynolds defined the post-punk era as occurring roughly between 1978 and 1984.[22] He advocated that post-punk be conceived as "less a genre of music than a space of possibility",[1]suggesting that "what unites all this activity is a set of open-ended imperatives: innovation; willful oddness; the willful jettisoning of all things precedented or 'rock'n'roll'".[22]AllMusic employs "post-punk" to denote "a more adventurous and arty form of punk".[7]
     
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  12. Neener

    Neener Tele-Holic

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    yes, love this tune
     
  13. Neener

    Neener Tele-Holic

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    nice tune. would spin something like this at a party
     
  14. Neener

    Neener Tele-Holic

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    I really dig that first one
     
  15. aging_rocker

    aging_rocker Tele-Holic

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    This thread needs some John McGeoch...



     
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  16. SuprHtr

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  17. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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  18. Marquee Moon

    Marquee Moon Tele-Holic

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    I took a few guitar lessons from Roger Miller. He told me besides Wire and Gang of four, all the guys in the band were really influenced by the Who and Cream.
     
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  19. cyclopean

    cyclopean Friend of Leo's

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    the mod-ettes:
     
  20. cyclopean

    cyclopean Friend of Leo's

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