Best books you ever read

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Downshift, Jul 16, 2013.

  1. czgibson

    czgibson Tele-Afflicted

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    Herman Melville - Moby Dick
    F. Scott Fitzgerald - The Great Gatsby
    Mary Shelley - Frankenstein
    Vladimir Nabokov - Lolita
    Jorge Luis Borges - Collected Fictions
    Anthony Burgess - Earthly Powers
    Douglas Adams - The Hitch-hiker's Guide to the Galaxy
    Umberto Eco - The Name of the Rose
    Hunter Thompson - The Great Shark Hunt

    Of all the books I've read, one stands above all the others, and that is James Joyce's Ulysses. It is the most beautifully written book, and it contains everything. It is also the funniest book I've read. I can pick it up at any time of day or night, open it to any page and be instantly rewarded with wit or insight.

    I managed to get halfway through War and Peace. I found the war parts tremendously exciting and the peace parts deadly dull. I think this may be the opposite of what Tolstoy intended. Anyway, there it sits on my bookshelf with the bookmark halfway through.
     
  2. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    the Bible. yeah, i'm gonna be that guy



    I've also enjoyed Papillon by Henri Charrière, Lolita by Nabakov (I've got to check out some of his other stuff), and most everything I've read by Herman Hesse, Nick Tosches, Harlan Ellison, and Raymond Chandler. Oh yeah and I was a huge Poe fan from about age 9.

    I like Tolkien as well , I find "The Hobbit" a more enjoyable read than the LOTR trilogy
     
  3. Chud

    Chud Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm more of a non-fiction kind of guy.
     
  4. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Papillon is a true story, sure it's embellished some probably.

    Tosches does plenty of non fiction that is as awesome as his made-up stuff

    The Bible, we won't go there for forum rules reasons
     
  5. Red Square

    Red Square Friend of Leo's

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    I love the Andrew Vachss books. Supreme detective stuff.

    Anything by Harry Crews. A Feast of Snakes and All We Need of Hell come to mind.

    If I had to pick one as the best book I've ever read I'd have to Go with A Confederacy of Dunces. Absolute total brilliance.
     
  6. gandsfjord

    gandsfjord Tele-Meister

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    I was looking for this, and there it was, on page 2.
    Best book... I don't know, but the only book that has made my hands shake. Literally.
    I think I've read everything from McCarthy.
    I also enjoyed the Patrick O'Brian books about British naval warfare during the Napoleonic wars.
     
  7. Achysklic

    Achysklic Tele-Holic

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    The best selling book of all time.

    The Bible!
     
  8. TJNY

    TJNY Friend of Leo's

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    I took it upon myself to read some books that my teenagers were reading and really found some gems in there! I wanted to be able to talk about the books with them. My youngest was reading voraciously a year or so ago. Don't overlook them because they may be geared toward teenagers. A good story is a good story regardless!

    For you zombie and action fans, check out this author and read a couple of his series. Specifically Rot & Ruin and the Joe Ledger novels.

    http://www.goodreads.com/series/list?id=72451.Jonathan_Maberry

    And yes, I have read a lot of the books already mentioned in this thread. Good suggestions!
     
  9. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    If he's "that guy", you must be "that other guy" :lol:
     
  10. Vanzant

    Vanzant Tele-Afflicted

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    The Fountainhead
    Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
    Dharma Bums
    Hell's Angels
    The Great Gatsby
    Lolita
     
  11. hoodtube12

    hoodtube12 Tele-Meister

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    Fountainhead
    Atlas Shrugged
    All books by Robert Ludlum
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2013
  12. bwikoff

    bwikoff TDPRI Member

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    House of Leaves by Mark Danielewski
    The Curfew by Jesse Ball
    The Illumination by Kevin Brockmeier
    American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
    Blankets by Craig Thompson

    I seem to enjoy a lot of magical realism, and I think that Danielewski and Ball have been pushing it about as far as it can go and creating great work in the process. Kinda the high postmodernism of literature. Brockmeier is just about the most creative writer I've come across in ages. Ellis seems to me to be the best of the brat pack, going for the jugular on topics that DeLillo plays at ironic distance. And Craig Thompson is absolutely masterful in his control of the comics medium to tell his autobiography.
     
  13. P Thought

    P Thought Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    I tried to make a "best ten" list, with a limit of one title per author, lest the job become completely impossible. Then I did a search for something, and lost my list so far, which was up to seven and not scratching the surface, and missing too many great books and authors. This is worse than naming "top ten guitarists". I'll try again:

    A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens
    Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain
    Cannery Row, by John Steinbeck (my desert island author)
    Slaughterhouse-Five, by Kurt Vonnegut
    Beloved, by Toni Morrison
    Anna Karenina, by Leo Tolstoy
    Ulysses, by James Joyce
    The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, by Carson McCullers
    Another Roadside Attraction, by Tom Robbins
    Lolita, by Vladimir Nabokov
    Kidnapped, by Robert Louis Stevenson

    YMMV. Mine, too. There are many great books and authors left off, and I'm worried about the underrepresentation of one of my all-time favorite genders here. Och, tamale.

    I really enjoy seeing threads like this. It does an English-teacher's heart good to see that literature isn't dead, at least not yet.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2013
  14. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Dang yeah, how did I leave off Mark Twain
     
  15. dan1952

    dan1952 Friend of Leo's

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    The Great Gatsby - Fitzgerald
    The Old Man And The Sea - Hemingway
    Trout Fishing In America - Richard Brautigan
    Slaughterhouse Five - Vonnegut
     
  16. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Not many books written by women, as far as I can tell. One big exception is Ayn Rand, which is funny because I'd put "Atlas Shrugged" on the list of the worst books I've read. [​IMG]
     
  17. nvilletele

    nvilletele Friend of Leo's

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    Why is that? It was a very fun book (Shibumi, by Trevanian), and I enjoyed it a lot. However, I don't think I would ever put it on a list of all time "Best" books, but certainly one of the best books for, say, airplane reading or for just plain fun. It was a well crafted story, kept your interest throughout, lots of action and excitement.
     
  18. nvilletele

    nvilletele Friend of Leo's

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    What, you don't like 60 (or was it 80?) page soliloquies . . . ?

    Actually, I don't care at all who the heck John Galt was . . . .
     
  19. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    It is just badly, badly written from start to finish. I'm setting the "philosophy" aside, without comment. Rand was obviously using the novel as a thin wrapper around the message, which must appeal to some people, but it's a poor excuse for a novel. Is it any wonder the movie bombed? Even Ayn Rand would agree the market is always right :lol:
     
  20. BobbyB

    BobbyB Tele-Afflicted

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    The Longest Day
    Book by Cornelius Ryan
    (not the movie)

    World War II all about a soldier and D-day...great book couldnt put it down.
     
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