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Been thinking of the Allman Brothers a lot lately

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Hatfield92, Jun 28, 2020.

  1. Hatfield92

    Hatfield92 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    my girlfriend and I recently spent a week and a half in the mountains of north Georgia. On the drive back home, we overnighted in Macon. And, although, much to my chagrin, the Big House Museum wasn’t yet back to its regular hours of operation, we did stand outside for a while. In the rain.

    We also visited the sites of Duane and Berry’s fatal accidents. And we visited Rose Hill Cemetery, where four of the six original members now rest, side by side. It was a pretty profound moment for me.

    I’ve been a big fan for much of my life. And, I’d put the ABB up against any other live band that walked the earth, in terms of musicianship, soul and consistency.

    But are they doomed to just fade from memory, with the band itself essentially dead and buried? Sure, there’s offshoot acts still active. And Derek Trucks is as impressive as anyone else I can think of.

    But are the Allman Brothers destined to be just a footnote somewhere in the history of American music?

    I hope not. To me, they may be the greatest American band ever.
     
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  2. PBO Blues

    PBO Blues Tele-Holic

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    I've waltzed around with a lot of musical styles over the past fifty years, but there's alway been one steadfast constant. The Brothers. They'll be the soundtrack at my wake.
     
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  3. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Well, you’re at prime Gen X age and you know who they are .

    And you couldn’t have seen them in their golden years cuz you weren’t born yet !

    But, the Haynes/Trucks years were great too.

    Turn some millennial or Gen Z kid onto them. Their fan base will shrink , like all bands that no longer exist (yes - even the Beatles ).

    But - some folks will always be discovering them, even if that group gets smaller every year .
     
  4. glbglb21

    glbglb21 TDPRI Member

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    there will always be yound aspiring musicians like i was at 14 finding a collection of old cassette tapes maybe in todays standards itll be an old usb flash drive but for me it was cassette tapes that had neil young, america, along with the doobie brothera and i believe even a allman brothers cassette not 100 percent sure along with many many more greats and i found inspiration in them and technology only made some of the older music easier to find for me. now my favorites come from mid-late 60s to early-mid 70s which in my opinion was the greatest time for music ever. and i was born in 1992. music lovers will find good music sometimes they just need a kickstart of course my grandma gave me my interest in the beatles cuz she always had oldies on in the car which at that time was focused on music from 50s into the 60s. so from someone born way after these greats you can share your love for them with the next generation and that love for them will go on for example i have 2 boys who actually enjoy when i listen to hendrix or jefferson airplane or the beatles even some of the doors and since its the music i love and listen too they have at least a fondness for it. so artists arent doomed to be forgotten. just gotta leave some old usbs arojnd with some of there albums and you can leave an inspiration like those tapes were for me.
     
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  5. kLyon

    kLyon Tele-Holic Gold Supporter

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    The Allman Brothers did such a beautiful thing, in such a beautiful way... geologic time is long and culture is written more in the minds - and hearts - of an era than its history; it's hard to say when the last person who had their mind blown even just by hearing Live at the Fillmore East will be gone. I only know that growing up and starting to play in bands where I did (Florida) when I did (Duane had just died when I got my first electric) their influence was huge.
     
  6. Mjark

    Mjark Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I agree they were way up there. They were unique but steeped deeply in Blues and Soul. I saw the original line up quite few times. When Tedeschi Trucks breaks out an Allman Brothers tune the crowd goes nuts within one bar. Not a footnote.
     
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  7. bcorig

    bcorig Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    Enjoy every second you have.
    https://youtu.be/pPTHem2iu0A
     
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  8. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    They were all truly unique and brilliant musicians.
    They left is with great, unforgettable music.
    I’m forever grateful to them, particularly Dickie Betts.
    Sorry you didn’t get to tour the museum, but you did get to experience Rose Hill Cemetery.
    I hope to make the pilgrimage someday myself.
     
  9. telleutelleme

    telleutelleme Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    The beauty of the Internet and Youtube in particular is it is easy to discover bands, even the old ones. I used to extol ABB at work and point the younger folks to them on Youtube. I think they may have obliged me cause I let them listen to music at work. I believe good always stands the test of time. At my mother's insistence I saw Nat King Cole when I was a teenager and I have loved his music since.
     
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  10. burtf51

    burtf51 Tele-Holic

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    No one even remotely compares, to call them Southern Rock is a misnomer of epic proportions
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2020
  11. stxrus

    stxrus Poster Extraordinaire

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    I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again. I’ve seen every version of the Allman Brothers including the Allman Joys
    The only band I’ve seen more was The Who

    There was a vibrancy when they played that, to me, was the heart and soul of southern blues rock from their beginning to the end.

    ABB may be gone physically but their music will continue to strike a chord with someone somewhere. It’s that timelessness they presented.

    Who knows where the word will be in 20 years. I know I’ll be gone and my youngest nephew will help carry the torch as long as he can. He’s already instilling into his children a love of our “old” music and good music in general
     
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  12. burtf51

    burtf51 Tele-Holic

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    You and me both, Cole was such a brilliant pianist and singer and Oscar Moore was and is such an inspiration. Have you listened to Nat's "Welcome To The Club" album with the Count Basie orchestra? If not, it's a must listen!
     
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  13. 985plowboy

    985plowboy Friend of Leo's

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    I am a longtime fan.
    I play ABB tunes for my kids, both CD’s and on my guitar.
    I hope they remember it as part of the musical soundtrack of their youth.
     
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  14. PlainAllman

    PlainAllman Tele-Afflicted

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    Duane Allman has probably been the largest influence on my musical journey of any guitar player. When I think about it it seems crazy because he was gone before I was born. It makes me realize how influential he is. Not just because of his body of work but also all the other guitar players who he influenced that also influenced me as well. Its like an avalanche of bluesy southern rock goodness. As long as they live in the hearts and minds of those who came after their memory can never fade. I keep this picture for inspiration. I can’t help but smile when I look at it and think how he must of felt like he was sitting on top of the world.
    C93264AB-46D7-4870-8F32-7D7DB6BF0D07.jpeg
     
  15. Bob Womack

    Bob Womack Tele-Afflicted

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    Well, most guitar magazines run a feature on Duane each year.

    Few younger guitarists don't know about him and all the ones I meet revere him as I do. Dickie is well-known as well, and the next generation guys, Derek and Warren, are both making their own mark and are still associated with the ABB.

    I think that as long as there are electric guitarists there will be respect for the band.

    If that weren't enough there is a pretty strong community around Gregg as well, both for his organ playing and for that voice.

    So perhaps it would be better to say that as long as there is a community of blues/rock/progressive music lovers there will be respect for the band.

    Bob
     
  16. Hatfield92

    Hatfield92 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Dude was only 24. 24!!! Can you imagine what he had left in him? Whenever someone talks about those who passed too young who could have produced a ton more influential stuff had they not been taken too soon, Duane and Buddy Holly top the list for me.

    Thanks everyone who’s taken the time to post reassuring sentiments. Sure, they say rock is dead, but kids still seem to really enjoy it when they’re exposed to it. Side note: I used to play lots of relaxing acoustic Neil Young, CSNY, America, Nick Drake and whatnot for my kids. They loved it. I can still remember my four year old daughter’s sweet little voice singing along to pink moon.
     
  17. thebowl

    thebowl Tele-Meister

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    Robert Johnson had what, two recording sessions? Died in his twenties. His music has had a fairly strong legacy.

    for me, Duane Allman was able to directly channel emotion on his instrument of choice, and the emotion was joy. I see people listening to it for a long time.
     
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  18. Paul G.

    Paul G. Friend of Leo's

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    If I may say so, the Allman Brothers is more than Duane and Berry -- we can't forget the great songwriting and fluid playing of Dickie Betts, the long career of Gregg Allman, the many iterations of the band which brought us Warren Haynes, Allen Woody, Derek Trucks and eventually Government Mule, Tedeschi-Trucks Band.

    The Live at the Fillmore East album is one of the best and most influential records of a generation.

    So, no...don't worry, the Allmans will not be forgotten.
     
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  19. Cysquatch

    Cysquatch Tele-Holic

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    I don't think they'll ever become a footnote. They were extremely influential in the jamband and southern rock scenes, which are significant enough to study on their own. And while there's been lots of bands like them, they are very singular in my mind. The guitar work is obviously great, but the two-headed beast that was Jaimoe and Butchy's drumming was really special and just feels like nothing else before or since to me. There's so much to soak in just from their partnership alone, that the ABB will at the very least be a point of study for musicians looking into any kind of contemporary rhythm work that it should keep the band going for another lifetime at least.

    Granted, at the end of the day, what survives - and especially survives us - comes down to what we teach the younger generations. Know a kid that's into music? Show 'em some ABB. Doubly good if they play an instrument and you teach them some ABB on it. Nothing will keep the Allman legacy alive longer than your investment in a young musician's life and showing them some good tunes from Duane and the bunch.
     
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  20. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

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    Had a pair of long drives this weekend beginning friday... listened to a fair bit of ABros and tedeschi trucks and my 23 year old son said, 'dad, I see why you think 'High Falls' is a perfect driving song....'

    We listened to the Brothers and Sisters reissue that night while reading at the cabin... again, just great music... it will never be lost... not even 17 year old Les Dudek's second solo on Ramblin Man...
     
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