Bedroom pedals???

Discussion in 'The Stomp Box' started by tlsmack, Sep 18, 2019.

  1. tlsmack

    tlsmack Tele-Afflicted

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    I noticed that Bjorn at gilmourish rates pedals both as overall and for bedroom use. I'm guessing because certain pedals are best suited for pushing an already driven tube amp, like a treble booster or power booster.

    Do you find certain pedals are geared more towards the bedroom player than the pro? My favorite tone ever was when Dan and Mick plugged a PowerBooster in to a HiwattDR103. Probably not the best apartment rig however.:)
     
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  2. j5jarod777

    j5jarod777 Tele-Meister

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    I can tell you that a FD2 Mosfet is NOT a bedroom pedal.
     
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  3. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

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    I've found it depends a lot on what 'bedroom' amp you're using.

    For example, I've found that a Rangemaster style treble booster works quite well when paired with a Hotone nano head and an IR loader cab sim. However, if I plug it into an old solid state Crate practice amp, it sounds awful.
     
  4. '64 Tele

    '64 Tele Tele-Holic

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    Do you have to be using a "bedroom" guitar?? :rolleyes:
     
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  5. Bill

    Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    Great topic. And I totally agree.

    As someone else implied, I bought a Fulldrive II that sounded dull at home. Same thing with an original TS9.

    On the other hand, my Blackstone Appliances Overdrive is perfect at home because it’s meant to be used with a clean amp.

    Surprisingly, my original triangle knob, first version Big Muff sounds incredible at home as well. The second version is just so so.
     
  6. bluesholyman

    bluesholyman Tele-Afflicted

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    My bedroom amp is a Fender Bassman - pedals work great when the wife is not around....
     
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  7. RetroTeleRod

    RetroTeleRod Poster Extraordinaire

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    My Visual Sound Open Road (Nobels ODR-1 clone) sounds nice and fat at low volumes.
     
  8. Obsessed

    Obsessed Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I think it is all relative, but to me, there are bedroom amps, not bedroom pedals.
     
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  9. Area51

    Area51 Tele-Holic

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    For sure, pedals like the zoom g1x series are plastic and probably won't hold up well for gigging. However, it's a fun pedal to sit on you coffee table and price is dirt cheap.
     
  10. D_Malone

    D_Malone Tele-Meister

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    I think the popularity of many dirt pedals is driven by bedroom players raving about them on forums.

    This is just my opinion/experience, but a lot of dirt pedals that people describe as “amp-like” don’t work well live. They usually have too much compression and bass, which makes them sound great at low volume.

    I’ll probably catch hell for saying this, but the BJF Honey Bee is a perfect example. Sounds absolutely gorgeous at low volume in my home studio. With the band it just blurs everything. Too smooth and compressed, no bark, no bite. It’s one of the most hyped pedals ever, and was selling for well over $300 at the height of its popularity.
     
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  11. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I agree with @D_Malone about the principle (I've not tried the Honey Bee).

    Broad generalization:

    - boutique pedals, "modded" pedals = bedroom pedals. Compressed. Low end that can't be dialed out. Tons of tiny switches and dials that can't be seen on stage under lights.
    - mass-produced pedals (Boss, MXR, DOD) = stage pedals. Catch all kinds of flack on forums for being "thin" or "harsh" or "grainy" or whatever. But take a pushed amp and give it definition and lift for leads, etc.

    There are exceptions I'm sure. FoxRox is boutique I guess. But everything I've tried seems to have stage in mind. I've read he plays out a lot and makes stuff that works for him, so there you go.
     
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  12. schenkadere

    schenkadere Friend of Leo's

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    My bedroom pedals sound terrible in my living room.
     
  13. 57fenderstrat

    57fenderstrat Tele-Meister

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    My bedroom pedal is a compressor, just enough to make my tube amp feel like it’s turned up alittle more. It’s also helpful when I want to feel like a have mega note sustain and it’s too late at night to drive my amp.

    I agree though like some fuzzes and pedals aren’t going to do much for you without driving your amp first
     
  14. Tuneup

    Tuneup Tele-Meister

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    Bedroom pedal? An attentuator.
     
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  15. D_Malone

    D_Malone Tele-Meister

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    Put a bed in your living room. Problem solved.

    I find a queen size offers a perfect balance. King size is too compressed. Don’t even think about a California king.
     
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  16. Guitarteach

    Guitarteach Poster Extraordinaire

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    Most tubescreamer types that mix some clean with the dirt sound awful to me at low volumes into too clean amps. My FD3 is like that.

    They can still goose the preamp of a good master volume amp.

    I think a big problem is people using amps without master volumes with pedals at low volume as ‘pedal platforms’.

    A modern Mesa or Marshall had got a lot of its core tone in the preamp and does not lose much ran low with the master down. I don’t have a ‘home’ or bedroom amp.. I just dial the masters to one on my stage monsters.
     
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  17. mkdaws32

    mkdaws32 Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    I've found RAT pedals, SD-1 variants, DS-1 variants and TS variants to be muddy, or fizzy through clean (especially SS), low volume amps. Most boosters, are okay, but don't really do much other than color the tone and add volume in the same situation (i.e. low volume, clean amps). BUT take most of those same pedals and put them in front of a plexi or Fender Deluxe on the verge of breakup at gig volumes, and be prepared to have your socks knocked off. The RAT is probably my favorite for this.

    Most of the "tube amp in a box" type modern dirt pedals will work better at getting good distortion/crunch tones at low volumes through a clean amp. I particularly like the MI Audio Crunchbox and the EXH Tortion. The Tortion is really nice, because with most of these types of pedals I find they do exactly the opposite of the others and can really muddy up a good, loud tube amp tone. But the Tortion is like a tube pre-amp with the tubes replaced by JFET transistors. I've used it as a dirtbox into a clean SS amp at home, at gig volume through the front of a tube amp (set pretty clean), at gig volume directly into an SS poweramp and a 1x12 speaker. Heck, a couple of years ago I used it direct into a PA for a Christmas Parade float gig! LOL! It has an XLR output with analogue cabinet simulation, in addition to the regular 1/4" output with no cab simulation. EXH did a really good job with this one.

    DISCLAIMER: Although this all worked well for me in the past, I have switched to a digital modelling preamp for simplicity. I need a lot of stacked delays, reverbs, modulations post pre-amp for the stuff I'm playing now and this was a simpler solution - shrunk my board to 1/3 it's prior size. :)
     
  18. schenkadere

    schenkadere Friend of Leo's

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    Foam or spring?
     
  19. D_Malone

    D_Malone Tele-Meister

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    Personal choice. Spring is more lively. Foam is tighter/punchier.
     
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  20. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I practice a lot at low volume with my Orange Rocker 15... with the attenuator I can go down to 0.5W or 1W. (I don't actually play in a bedroom though.)

    I actually feel like an awful lot of drive pedals really suck at bedroom volume. This could easily be a case of "attenuator vs no attenuator" but in general if I'm using the attenuator it almost always sounds better to adjust the amp volume + gain for what I want than to step on a pedal. Mostly cause the pedals really want to bring the volume up a LOT and can make it really easy to end up outside that tolerable "bedroom volume" range. Most other kinds of pedals like reverb, delay, modulation all seem totally fine at bedroom volume levels.

    If I was going to pick a drive pedal that works best for me ironically I would say the Tube Screamer is by far the best. Seems like that could be a case of having the attenuator though if everyone else thinks it doesn't work real well when you don't have an attenuator.

    The main reasons I like the Tube Screamer is it has a decent amount of compression, I think this is really important at bedroom volume because it allows you to play at a moderate volume and still get variations in drive at different pick attacks. So I can easily use the TS to get a light drive sound on my clean channel that behaves really well. That would be something like 50% gain on the TS and then slowly bring up the volume to unity or just above unity. I have a Klon(e) right now too, a Wampler Tumnus Deluxe. The Tumnus is much much less compressed. I feel like the Klon circuit is really well targetted at those light drive sounds where you pick light and get clean sounds and pick hard and get drive sounds. But when you do so with a Klon unlike a TS the volume variation on the Klon circuit seems to be huge. It actually seems like it increases the dynamic range beyond what my amp does when the amp itself is driving. So the Klon circuit is really easy to end up playing way too loud.

    If I use the drive channel on my amp it is probably easier to get satisfying sounds out of most drive pedals. But it's also somewhat unnecessary in the first place. I find the volume knob doesn't work really great with the attenuator on at "bedroom" levels. It basically gets too quiet when you roll the volume off. Very different than running at full power. The drive channel can basically be setup for crunch and then it's really easy to get almost any drive/boost to sound good without too huge of a volume increase. But if you're not trying to switch two sounds while playing you can just turn the knobs on the amp and do just about anything you want without the pedals. What I've noticed if I reduce the attenuator is obviously I get a lot more volume but the volume knob on the guitar starts getting much more effective, and the response of drive pedals changes. I think it'd be a real disaster to practice at bedroom volume with pedals and have the pedals set just so and then go somewhere and turn off the attenuator and play at stage volume... pretty much all the drive pedals I've seen would need to have different settings AFAICT. It seems like the perceived amount of drive/gain from the pedal goes down as the attenuation goes away.

    I'm not in a big space and I'm not that far from the amp, and I usually have the amp elevated. It's pretty easy turning on any of these pedals to start pushing towards 85-90dB @ 6ft from the amp which is starting to be in the range my ears are going to be a little irritated. To me comfortable concert volume is 90-100dB, so 85-90dB at home is pretty freakin loud.
     
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