Battling rust in the workshop/garage

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by TelenTubes, May 18, 2020.

  1. TelenTubes

    TelenTubes Tele-Holic

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    Okay, most of the tools I own I've de-rusted/cleaned a half dozen times. Any suggestions on keeping things rust-free while storing your tools? I've had a bit better luck storing hand planes and saws in a wooden cabinet which seems to absorb moisture before the iron does.

    Even my tool cabinet rusted on the side. Ridiculous. Anyways, trying to find a good source for pure camphor blocks to put in the cabinets and chests, but was at Big Box store tonight looking for an entry level welder (no luck at all), and saw this: How about some brand new rust, lol?

    IMG_0751.jpg
     
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  2. Guitardvark

    Guitardvark Tele-Holic

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    I hose all my tools with wd 40 then wipe em down, put em up wrapped in shop towels. no rust. its maybe excessive but I make my living with them tools.
     
  3. drf64

    drf64 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm sure you own a wire wheel. It's my most used power tool. For things like pliers, screw drivers, wrenches, sockets and your hex keys, it's the only way. Not much else you can do. When they get rusty, go shine em up on the wire wheel. For big tools like pipe wrences, I liberally grease the adjusting knurl once every few years.
     
  4. TelenTubes

    TelenTubes Tele-Holic

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    I have a wire wheel. And a garbage pail that periodically gets filled with Evaporust for cleaning soaking tools. But crap.

    Heck, I know I should use the tools more, then they wouldn't rust as much. But I have a strict once-a-year limit on excessive post-hole digging.
     
  5. Hammerdog

    Hammerdog Tele-Meister

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    Controlling the humidity in your shop is the only way to keep your tools
    rust free, and your lumber at the correct moisture level.
    I have a 30x40 shop/mancave, it’s air conditioned in the spring and summer. In the winter I run a wood stove and/or a dehumidifier.
    50% humidity works good for me. Your in Waco, I’m in East Texas,
    It’s a challenge in the spring with cool nights and warm humid days.
     
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  6. TelenTubes

    TelenTubes Tele-Holic

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    I'll have to research some humidity control. Humidity is high here in Central Texas, too. Grew up in Palestine, though. Miss the trees!!!

    Maybe I'll check out one of the split units?
     
  7. Peegoo

    Peegoo Friend of Leo's

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    If you have a bare concrete floor, most of the moisture in a shop comes up through the slab.

    Seal it with a liquid masonry sealer or a purpose-made epoxy coating designed for concrete. Concrete paint and concrete stain do not seal out moisture.

    Thompson's Water Seal does seal masonry, but I don't like it for floors because it does not dry all the way and you can track it into the house, onto carpets, etc. I learned that the hard way years ago when I used it on a wood deck.

    Anti-rust measures like the aformentioned WWJD-40 do work, but if you do fine finishes on wood, any oils or silicones on woodworking tools can play hell with finishes because the oil can get into the wood.

    Cast iron surfaces in my shop get rubbed with steel wool and then paste waxed with Johnson's. Tools that are infrequently used are wiped with WD-40 and put away. Before use, I wipe 'em down with a shop towel dampened with mineral spirits to remove oil that might get on wood.
     
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  8. Hammerdog

    Hammerdog Tele-Meister

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    I don’t know about split units but that sounds like a good way to go.
    I would size the unit according to you square footage as well as how your area is insulated.
    Your dealing with, changing air temperature vs humidity = condensation
    = RUST. And molding leather. Yikes, what a mess.
     
  9. Hammerdog

    Hammerdog Tele-Meister

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    The building codes here require a moisture barrier under the slab,
    fancy word for sheet plastic. Your right about moisture moving thru the slab, I’ve seen non insulated metal roofs “sweat “ from the air temp vs
    humidity, you damn near head to where a rain coat. If it’s an older slab
    It may not have the moisture barrier.
     
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  10. dougstrum

    dougstrum Tele-Afflicted

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    Hate is a strong word, but I am happy to use it in reference to rust and mildew:mad:
     
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