Battery Technology Breakthrough?

imwjl

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no, that looks like trolling :)
What is the breakthrough for 9 volts, maybe 12 or 18 and milliamps? What @dkmw posted is about the battery packs that are hundreds of volts and also very different via high amperage. I'm not interested in participating with you if you are just doing petulant crapping on something otherwise very interesting and possibly a true breakthrough.
 

imwjl

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I am a little skeptical too, but then I don’t know diddly about electricity. I’d like to hear what some ee types have to say. But I do believe that someday there will be a breakthrough (so many smart people working on it). And that will be a great day.
The reincarnated or sold back Maxwell is still at it.


Nothing in my investing is speculative like those firms now that my Medicare decisions will have to be made all too soon and same time we have 3 kids in college!
 

dkmw

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So the ultra capacitor approach is not new? Like I said, I need someone with actual knowledge in this field to explain it to me like a child, because that’s my level of electrical expertise. I only know enough to get the boat home the few times I’ve had trouble at sea.
 

Peegoo

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I have zero appreciation regarding EV applications (as that entire concept is clearly a fool's errand)...
can this new tech be used to power my pedalboard?

Battery technology and improved efficiency is a simple matter of chemistry. Getting the chemicals to do what we want without breaking down over time, however, is the challenge.

In the very near future, power to run a device will be from a chemical source within the material of which the device is constructed. In other words, there will be no battery; the device itself will be the energy storage component.

In the meantime, I'll stick with a lithium ion pack for my power supply.

Fly-Rig-Board-CR.jpg
 

boop

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There are dozens of startups and companies working on batteries. This is a press release from a company of six people saying they have the next great development, no doubt looking for investors. Could be the next big thing, could be not, but it seems there is no way to know about the viability of whatever they have based on this.
 

dkmw

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There are dozens of startups and companies working on batteries. This is a press release from a company of six people saying they have the next great development, no doubt looking for investors. Could be the next big thing, could be not, but it seems there is no way to know about the viability of whatever they have based on this.

I didn’t post the press release, but of course I could have. This is the coverage of the press release and there’s lots more. Morand also has considerable experience with applications in racing, and almost everything good about modern cars has come from motorsport (seatbelts, mirrors, disc brakes, fuel injection, crash structure, regenerative braking, hybrid systems, on and on). This gives me hope.

But in no way am I saying this is a sure thing. Time will tell.
 

imwjl

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I didn’t post the press release, but of course I could have. This is the coverage of the press release and there’s lots more. Morand also has considerable experience with applications in racing, and almost everything good about modern cars has come from motorsport (seatbelts, mirrors, disc brakes, fuel injection, crash structure, regenerative braking, hybrid systems, on and on). This gives me hope.

But in no way am I saying this is a sure thing. Time will tell.
I'm with you if I understand it. A company with some proven success involved with something new is often a good thing because a lot of good ideas or research will not always be accompanied with general business prowess.

My understanding was Tesla wanted Maxwell more for electrode or battery cell technology than the capacitor business.

Transportation and energy are high cost areas and have many interesting aspects so lots get excited and interested. It would be really amazing to see a major breakthrough in something chemistry/physics/engineering/superconductivity in our lifetimes that would be a leap like we've witnessed with genetics and other engineering.

The industry not so battery constrained might drive new investment and research because so much has been and is being spent on new manufacturing plant capacity. My guess is GM's price and range for the next gen Chevy Equinox along with 2024 model year product tells us something about the manufacturing investments. I've got some respect for any auto maker who can pull off what that product is supposed to be.
 

kuch

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safe nuclear fusion
it's the answer to all of our power needs
the pet ro biz is holding back alternate means of energy production

in lieu of that, home storage batteries that would eliminate the need for generators will be the next big thing
 

PhoenixBill

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Think back to the 1950’s. The conventional lead-acid battery met all the needs of the automobile industry—gas was cheap and plentiful. Carbon-zinc batteries were good enough for flashlights; there weren’t any portable consumer devices to speak of. So there was little need for battery research. Then the advent of the transistor began the boom in consumer electronics and researchers began studying more advanced batteries, such as alkaline cells. By 2000 there was a huge need for batteries with great energy density as well as fast recharge ability. Thousands upon thousands of researchers were now working on the technology. Large public universities tended to have well-scrutinized research programs (contrary to the opinion of certain talk show hosts) since their research was going to be peer-reviewed exhaustively. On the other end of the spectrum, private companies arose as start-ups in need of money. These folks tend to promote unverified findings to get investment capital. Note also that researchers have already “picked the low-hanging fruit” which means future advances are going to require considerable more research and laboratory testing. So I am leery of small start-ups claiming “the next big thing”.
 

dkmw

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Think back to the 1950’s. The conventional lead-acid battery met all the needs of the automobile industry—gas was cheap and plentiful. Carbon-zinc batteries were good enough for flashlights; there weren’t any portable consumer devices to speak of. So there was little need for battery research. Then the advent of the transistor began the boom in consumer electronics and researchers began studying more advanced batteries, such as alkaline cells. By 2000 there was a huge need for batteries with great energy density as well as fast recharge ability. Thousands upon thousands of researchers were now working on the technology. Large public universities tended to have well-scrutinized research programs (contrary to the opinion of certain talk show hosts) since their research was going to be peer-reviewed exhaustively. On the other end of the spectrum, private companies arose as start-ups in need of money. These folks tend to promote unverified findings to get investment capital. Note also that researchers have already “picked the low-hanging fruit” which means future advances are going to require considerable more research and laboratory testing. So I am leery of small start-ups claiming “the next big thing”.

Yeah, that’s why I put a question mark on the post header. If I was sure this is the next big thing, I would have put an exclamation point.

But I do believe there will be a breakthrough someday, and the first we hear of it may resemble how this is being covered. So I remain hopeful…
 

FlatAffectCamper

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The battery technology will advance of course - but so will expectations. There will be expectation inflation in what people do with their EVs. Notice that the Tesla cars can accelerate super fast, but they're also heavy as hell. Acceleration of that pig costs a lot of electric power. So when it gets to the point that the whole developed world is in a big, heavy, smooth, fast SUVs programmed to drive faster than the other guy, autonomously, it will require a huge amount of electric power generation.

There's no such thing as "how much energy we need." That's a moving goalpost.

As someone else pointed out, technologies both on the production and consumption side always get bought by Google or whatever, or god forbid, Huawei, because they have to power to do hostile takeovers and litigate these six engineering kids into a pulp if they don't comply. So when fossil fuels are eventually outlawed, as maybe they should be, the electricity won't be cheap. And you'll need a lot of it to keep up with the Joneses.

This is why I think every drop of oil in Nigeria and places like that will get pumped and roasted, no matter the green energy economics in the West. Technology only solves problems from the point of view of the person who owns the lever.
 

Masmus

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I didn’t post the press release, but of course I could have. This is the coverage of the press release and there’s lots more. Morand also has considerable experience with applications in racing, and almost everything good about modern cars has come from motorsport (seatbelts, mirrors, disc brakes, fuel injection, crash structure, regenerative braking, hybrid systems, on and on). This gives me hope.

But in no way am I saying this is a sure thing. Time will tell.
I have no opinion on this company other that I hope this works.

Most articles like this are rewritten almost verbatim from press releases. It's unfortunately a sign of our times where news sources regurgitate press releases and pretend they are doing actual work. If this was a high school or collage paper they would be busted for plagiarizing.

Again I'm not saying anything bad about the company just that the news article is nearly identical to the news report.
 




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