Bandsaw bottom wheel tracking

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by mangus, Jan 24, 2020.

  1. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    The Alex Snodgrass video is good, but keep in mind that if the bandsaw he is using for the demo wasn't already set up in a coplanar and parallel condition - it would be driving good old Alex bananas too ;).
     
  2. old_picker

    old_picker Tele-Afflicted

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    Gave up on mine in the end. Its a 14"jet with an 8"riser and I reckon its the riser that has thrown mine out. Wasted hours on attempting to get it right in the end I just decided to split the difference and it still cuts fine and has done for the 12 years or so.

    I never tried pulling off the wheel as I figure if the cast riser has swivelled the top wheel a bit and I am past trying to true it up. Once you loosen of those riser bolts things start moving - heavy things. As I remember it the riser had dimples which mated to the frame so it probably not possible to change it anyhow.

    End of the day with a good blade it cuts like billy'o and if the deck is square to the blade dead vertical. It will even resaw 10" hardwood
     
  3. koolaide

    koolaide Tele-Holic

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    Late to the party and did not read all for thread. Sorry if this is rebumbnent ;)

    If you follow Alex Snodgrass you IMO are on track. I recall him saying in his video that location of blade on bottom doesn't matter, and that you should NOT try to make the wheels coplanar...

    If it cuts well, tracks without drift and is not making bad noises. I say leave it alone, but that's just me. I followed Alex Snodgrass setup years ago and my saw cuts well without drift... I don't care where the blade is on bottom YMMV.
     
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  4. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Has anyone tried making a big notched straight edge to check the upper and lower wheels while spanning over the frame? The manual to my bandsaw suggested it but obviously it did not strike me as a necessary thing to check.
     
  5. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    Viz, you don't even need a notched straight-edge. :)

    A regular straight-edge (or a reasonable facsimile) is all it takes.

    All ya need to do is remove the upper and lower wheel covers/housings. That will allow you to check things well enough to know where your at.

    If you pull the table off, you can run a regular straight-edge and check the wheels at any point you choose.

    On my 14" bandsaw as well as the others I've seen, it's just a matter of loosening up the two knobs that allow for the table to tilt for angled cuts and then removing the table.
     
  6. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    Double check the state of the lower wheel i.e. bearing or frame distortion i.e. cracks in the frame or sloppy roller bearing centre etc. Does the top half bolt onto the lower section? When I bought my 14" saw a long time ago I fitted a riser block to it afterwards to extend the cut height. Just checked that support area with a straight edge to ensure both halves were in line.

    As stated previously all the alignment is done on the top wheel, but if the saw comes apart into two sections for shipping etc, maybe needs a close look at how each half sits in relation to the other.

    When you are convinced the frame is properly aligned then redo the Snodgrass alignment procedure. I bought my 14' saw in December 1999 and fitted the riser a couple of years later......still runs like a new one, especially after I Snodgrassed it!

    Does your's have a cast iron frame?

    Hope you work it out!

    DC
     
  7. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Afflicted

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    That's the same way my saw is assembled, Dave - the upper and lower cast iron assemblies are joined by a single bolt that draws the two halves together; a draw-bolt.

    There is a roll pin that fits into corresponding holes in each half for the purpose of alignment.

    The big problem on my saw was the in-accuracy of the roll pin holes.

    The way it came from the factory, the holes were mis-aligned, and I could never get the blade to track properly or cut consistently true.

    Trying to use Snodgrass's or anybodies else's method of adjustment for accuracy and consistency was nothing but a frustrating exercise ;).

    I resolved that problem by removing the draw-bolt and roll pin and blocking up the upper half so the the upper wheel was parallel and co-planar with the lower wheel, then drilled new holes for the roll pin. I also used a larger diameter draw-bolt and larger washers that I modified to fit the space tightly and help to hold the new and proper alignment.

    I toyed with the idea of fabricating a riser block to increase the re-saw capacity, but I haven't gotten around to doing that yet.

    Maybe I'll do that when I get around to putting some good quality tires on it :).
     
  8. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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