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BandSaw Blades what do you use, Teeth and Type

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by Dmann, Jan 3, 2014.

  1. Dmann

    Dmann Tele-Meister

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    I picked up an older Grizzly Bandsaw on craigslist awhile ago and am getting it up and running.

    My question is what blades should I get for guitar building cutting bodies and re-sawing fret boards?

    i understand for cutting body blanks I'd want a smaller blade maybe a 1/4 inch with 6 to 8 teeth.

    For resawing I want maybe a 1/2" to 3/4" with fewer teeth like 3 or 4.

    What are you using.

    Its a G1073 16" with a 7 1/4 max cutting height. Its solid cast iron and about 400 lbs. The down side is it doesn't take a riser block so the max cut is limited.
     
  2. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

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    I use a 6 tpi pos. claw 3/8 blade for most cutting , for resawing I use a 3 tpi 1/2 " blade , I resaw fret boards with the 3/8" blade , I only use the 1/2" blade on heavy resawing . I also use Timberwolf or Olsen blades , good blades make a world of difference .
     
  3. Dmann

    Dmann Tele-Meister

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    Thanks, I've heard good things about Timberwolf, I have two multi tooth 3/4" blades they gave me with the saw and I haven't been impressed.

    I just built a tensioning jig I saw on youtube that should help me get that right.
     
  4. PapaWheelie

    PapaWheelie Tele-Meister

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    This may go against standard wisdom but I usually use a 1/2" blade for cutting bodies and necks. The reason being I have greater ability to cut very straight and with more control. All I want to do is cut as close to the outside of the pencil line as possible without touching it as the final cleanup will be with a router. I want the router to take as fine a pass as possible. I will use a spindle sander to help clean up tight curves before routing. I hate sanding the edges of a body especially when using a harder wood. If I can just remove a blonde hair thickness with the router my work is cut in half and prevents tear-out and very hard to sand burns.
    When I use a nice sharp 1/4 or 3/8 blade, any flinch, hiccup or pause on my part doing a larger item like a guitar body can leave hard to remove saw marks. Like I said, this probably is the opposite of conventional wisdom but seems to work for me.
     
  5. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Friend of Leo's

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    I like Timberwolf blades. I've had good luck with them. I also like the Highland Hardware wood slicer blades especially for re-sawing. I have a 14" saw with a riser block and use a 3/16" 6 TPI blade for bodies and necks and a 1/2" 3 or 4 TPI blade for re-sawing. 1/2" is the widest I can tension:oops: but it works good.
     
  6. Douglas Ingram

    Douglas Ingram Tele-Meister

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    Like others, I have settled on a 1/2", 3tpi for most tasks.

    I'd add a 1/4" 6tpi, 1/8" 12tpi (or thereabouts), and a 1/2" 12tpi for metal.

    This will do pretty much anything.

    Many saws can take a 3/4" blade, but in reality they are too stiff to bend around the wheels well and break prematurely. You need an 18" wheel to not fatigue the metal.

    Proper saw setup is more critical than blade size. Far more important!
     
  7. Dmann

    Dmann Tele-Meister

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    I find that setting up my power tools teaches me a lot about how they work and how to get better performance out of them.

    I've been working on tweaking the set up with the 3/4 blades I have.
    I just built a tensioning Jig for my dial indicator and need to shim the table on one side to square it.

    I usually follow the set up with a simple shop project using the tool.
     
  8. otterhound

    otterhound Poster Extraordinaire

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    When resawing , I use a Lennox Woodmaster CT 1" x 1.3 TPI hook .
    I need another bandsaw so I can keep one of them set up specifically for resawing .
     
  9. nnieman

    nnieman Tele-Meister

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    I use a 3tpi skip tooth blade for everything. For cutting bodies and around the lower horn, I do some relief cuts and it seems to work out well.
    For cutting tight curves and small stuff, I have a scroll saw

    Oh, and I do a ton of resawing. If your bandsaw is set up properly, it's no problem. Google Michale Fortune bandsaw setup for some great advise.
     
  10. i386

    i386 TDPRI Member

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    I am a new bandsaw owner. I tried making a bandsaw box with the 6tpi blade that came with my 14" Grizzle. It mostly burned the wood. Now I have an Olson 4tpi skip tooth in 3/16" width. It works much better. I've also been doing a little resawing with some oak firewood and cedar. I've resawn oak up to 6" thick with no problem. I would think this blade should work well for cutting out a body shape. If the Olson 4tpi works this well for resaw, the Wood Slicer blades must be REALLY good.
     
  11. oldunc

    oldunc Tele-Meister

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    I pretty much agree with this- the 1/8" blade is needed to make some of the turns on a Telecaster body, though in a pinch you can use a larger blade and a lot of sanding. I have a 17" saw (14" resaw capacity) I've tried larger blades on it, but the 1/2" 3tpi really works best for resawing (which I wouldn't actually attempt at 14"). Bandsaws made for woodworking generally don't accept riser blocks, having monolithic bodies.
     
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