Baking bread

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by gobi_grey, Mar 26, 2020.

  1. gobi_grey

    gobi_grey Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,131
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2011
    Location:
    clinton, ia
    Bread is hard to find these days so we tried making our own tonight. Just took it out of the oven. I've never made bread before. This is simple white bread. I'll still eat it whether it's good or not but any bread baking tips, recipes? I kind of like doing it so I'll probably keep trying for a while to see if I come up with something good.
    It really makes me appreciate the fact that a month ago I could buy really good sammich bread for 50 cents a loaf. Still can if they have it. I have no idea how they can do that and still make a profit. I used way more than 50 cents worth of flour, let alone the yeast and energy from running the oven and 3 hours of my time.
     
  2. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    38,424
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Location:
    San Benito County, California
    we have taken to making stuff from scratch... one of the awesome things is... we can. you can. we all can. My wife made buns, pork roast and beans for supper. The first ones she made last week 'collapsed' and instead of being discouraged, we kept quoting the great british baking show and this week, they did not collapse and they are gorgeous!

    60687680422__B01D57CB-A128-4D4D-A6A3-4F90D44002A7.jpeg

    My wife got the pork recipe (crock pot) from the pioneer woman, and buns are hamburger buns on allrecipes.com the beans were in the instapot on the pioneer woman's site... my wife adapts all of it a little, but man... we ate like kings...

    Our new normal is a notch up.
     
    gobi_grey, imwjl, DrPepper and 5 others like this.
  3. DaphneBlue

    DaphneBlue Tele-Meister

    Age:
    33
    Posts:
    465
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2017
    Location:
    Switzerland
    I just tested a recipe where you have nothing to do but mix flour, dry yeast and salt with water.

    430g of flour
    1/4 of a coffee spoon of dry yeast
    1,5 coffee spoon of salt
    3,8dl of water

    It's called no-knead bread. Check it on the internet.

    You seal it and leave it in a big bowl for 10-15hours. Then you can bake it. I personally bake it in an hour so I'll keep you updated :)
     
    electrichead and getbent like this.
  4. JuneauMike

    JuneauMike Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    4,983
    Joined:
    May 5, 2015
    Location:
    Alaska
    Have fun, make sure your yeast fires off before dumping it in the mix. 2:1 ratio of flour to water, trust your ears when deciding if its baked enough. The smell of fresh bread is worth the effort.
     
    gobi_grey likes this.
  5. WingedWords

    WingedWords Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    1,265
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2015
    Location:
    UK Europe.
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2020
    DaphneBlue, imwjl, 8barlouie and 2 others like this.
  6. hekawi

    hekawi Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    62
    Posts:
    9,715
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2003
    Location:
    greenville, sc
    All our local grocery stores are now out of dry yeast.
     
    jrblue and getbent like this.
  7. matmosphere

    matmosphere Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    791
    Joined:
    May 27, 2015
    Location:
    earth
    I had a sourdough starter going for the past three or four months, but had to leave it home when we left. It’s fun and after a couple of tries it gets easier. Don’t have a lot of pictures of the more recent loaves that were getting really good.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,674
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2014
    Location:
    Lions & Tigers oh Mi !
    Italy ran out of yeast to make pizza, like the great TP shortage problem.

    If you can find even half a packet, get a jar, water flour, and mix it up. every day remove half and add half of new flour and water. You will have an infinite amount of yeast.

    If you heat up your water you can cut the rise time from overnight into several hours ahead of baking. Mix the yeast in the flour before adding the hot water.

    When you make bread, you'll eat more because it tastes so much better than the store bought versions and you'll gain weight, so be cautious.

    .
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2020
  9. matmosphere

    matmosphere Tele-Holic

    Posts:
    791
    Joined:
    May 27, 2015
    Location:
    earth
    If you mix in some whole wheat or rye flour stuff gets yummy real quick.

    also started making our own tortillas and pita bread.
     
  10. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,387
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2009
    Location:
    Coolum Beach,Australia
    I love watching one of those cooking shows when they hang out with an Italian family on a weekend and make all their Passata and make an oven full of different breads to divvy up between the family...

    watching them make a huge batch of dough in a wooden tub the size of a bath.. go away and let it rise.. punch it down like a big parachute and shape the loaves, then stack the big old outdoor oven full after mopping and testing the heat...sealing the door with some dough...

    then coming back to open and fish the loaves out...

    I swear when they open that oven.. I can smell the fresh bread and my mouth waters...:)
     
    teleaddicted and getbent like this.
  11. AndyPanda

    AndyPanda Tele-Holic

    Age:
    66
    Posts:
    688
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2019
    Location:
    Bay Area, California
    bread is hard to find in stores here too. I have a wheat grinder and a few 50lb bags of wheat ... I also keep a San Francisco sourdough culture growing.
    Bread.jpg
     
  12. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

    Posts:
    23,387
    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2009
    Location:
    Coolum Beach,Australia
    Bread shelves were stocked today, I bought my regular sliced loaf... :)
     
    getbent likes this.
  13. Alamo

    Alamo Doctor of Teleocity

    Posts:
    11,433
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2006
    Location:
    Berlin
    Would you like a sountrack with that? :D



    better sound quality:

     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2020
    Han Valen likes this.
  14. Engine Swap

    Engine Swap Tele-Meister

    Posts:
    142
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2014
    Location:
    Chicago
    We've been making bread for 2 weeks now. More work, but definitely an upgrade. Recommend giving it a whirl. Lots of great videos out there. Getting the yeast to fire is the hardest part.

    Went to the store for the first time in 12 days last night. No yeast or bread flower.

    They did have plenty of bread, so we got some. We're still OK with yeast and flower.
     
    getbent likes this.
  15. bgmacaw

    bgmacaw Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    3,527
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2006
    Location:
    Near Athens GA USA
    getbent likes this.
  16. kafka

    kafka Tele-Afflicted

    Posts:
    1,366
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2013
    Location:
    Potomac, MD
    I've made bread for decades. Not rocket science, but someone has to show you what's important.

    1.) Use baker's percentage/mass (i.e. weigh your ingredients) instead of volumetric measurements. Flour is highly compressible. You can't get consistent results using volume. *****This is seriously 95% of what you need to know in order to bake bread. Everything else is detail.***** https://www.kingarthurflour.com/pro/reference/bakers-percentage

    2.) A good dough will probably be wetter than you thought it would be. Flour on the surface is what keeps it from sticking. That doesn't mean mix in more flour. It means put just enough on the surface so it doesn't stick.

    3.) A baker's stone vastly improves oven performance, for all cooking. I use a rectangular Fibrament stone custom made for my oven https://bakingstone.com. I leave mine in all the time. I never clean it. If food spills on it, I just let it burn to ash. The only caveat is that it needs to be preheated for 20-30 minutes.


    Flour doesn't last forever, even if it looks and smells just fine. Fresh is better. Short of that, you can vacuum seal and freeze it. If you don't have freezer space, vacuum sealing is fine.

    Packets of yeast are incredibly expensive. A pound of instant yeast will take me years to finish. Just keep it in the fridge. It won't die.

    It hardly takes any yeast at all to make a bread. Ancient people didn't even know what yeast was. There's so much of it in the environment anyway, they just left their bread out until it rose. You can do the same.

    Salt. Your bread tastes like your salt. Plain ole Morton's iodized tastes pretty good. It has a slightly peppery flavor. Their kosher is also good. Somewhat warmer tasting. But I prefer French grey sea salt. Himalayan pink is good, also.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2020
  17. Lonn

    Lonn Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    57
    Posts:
    3,515
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    Location:
    Indiana
    We have a bread maker, haven't used it in a while, probably should break it out again.
     
    getbent likes this.
  18. WingedWords

    WingedWords Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    69
    Posts:
    1,265
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2015
    Location:
    UK Europe.
    Some banjo music to listen to while your dough proves. The brilliant Lukas Pool playing Angeline the Baker.



    https://ozarkbanjo.com
     
    Jlwctn likes this.
  19. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    6,377
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2012
    Location:
    North of Boston
    I got a super simple recipe for you.
    The key to great bread is time, weight and heat.
    It's best to weigh you ingredients to for the best final product.

    For 2 loves of bread I use this formula:

    24 oz of white flour (King Arthur regular flour is basically as good as anyone's bread flour so if you can't get bread flour of your store brand use the KA)
    16 oz of water
    1 1/2 tsp Salt
    2 1/4 tsp of bread machine yeast

    Mix the salt and flour.

    Warm the water to just above room temp, then add the yeast. Let this sit for a minute. The yeast will slowly make the water cloudy. Then add the Flour and Salt mixture.

    Then knead the dough. It should go from slightly messy exterior to a nice smooth surface. Then roll it into a ball, place it in a lightly oil dish or bowl covered. Then you need to let it rise for 45min to 1:30 depending on how warm the room temp is. Once this first rise is done, you'll need to knead the dough again, this time being gentler. Then roll it back up and let it rise 1 more time for about 45min. Each rise should see the dough double is volume.
    Lastly prep your pans (lightly buttered or oiled if not non stick), then split the dough in half weight wise. Form 2 loaves, kneading gently to form them. Then those 2 loaves need to rise another 45 minutes before you bake them.

    10-15 minutes before they are ready to bake pre-heat your over to 500 or the highest you can get. While it's heating up put a tray or cookie sheet at the bottom of the oven with water in it. It should be fairly full so that as the over heats you don't loose all the water to evaporation prior to baking the bread.

    Once you've reached the point where the bread is risen and the oven is as hot as you can get put the bread in. Then for 2 minutes keep the oven at it's highest setting then lower it to 425. The loaves take me about 30 minutes to bake after I reset the oven. Once the bake is complete I take them out of the oven, then out of the pan immediately, check the bottoms. If the bottoms don't sound hollow or look brown put back in the oven w/out the pans for 5 minutes or so.

    Then let them cool for at least 2 hours before slicing, although they tend to be much easier to cut if let them sit 4 + hours or over night. (yes they still taste amazing then)

    A slight variation of this is after the first rise, instead of leaving it out to rise again put it in the fridge over night to rise. It will do so much slower and between the gasses and the alcohol being produced by this longer fermentation the taste is amazing.

    Another variation of this is to replace 2 oz of the water with milk. This makes the bread much softer like the store bought sandwich breads out there.

    With the basic recipe above you can use small tweaks like small amounts of spice to make it more enjoyable. ( I like to do some dry garlic powder and a little fresh garlic to make garlic bread) You can replace some of the water with something like apple cider to make a sweeter bread, or white wine for a tasty dinner roll.

    Good Luck!

    If you want stuff to read I highly recommend anything by Peter Reinhart or Ciril Hitz, their books took my bread making knowledge to a new level. Especially Reinhart's Crust and Crumb and Baking Artisan Breads Everyday fantastic books for this!
     
  20. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

    Posts:
    8,674
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2014
    Location:
    Lions & Tigers oh Mi !
    .

    No knead bread methods




    trick without dutch oven.


    .
     
    DaphneBlue and teleaddicted like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.