Attenuator or plexi shield?

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by charlie chitlin, Mar 9, 2019.

  1. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Well...I found a piece of plexi in the tractor shed...all kindsa stuff lying around when you live on a farm!
    At first listen, definitely a bit quieter, and DEFINITELY cuts highs.
    I'll haul it to a gig and see how it goes.
    plexi.JPG
    If it works well, I suppose I'll get a proper hinge, but this gorilla tape holds like a rabid dog!
     
  2. aerhed

    aerhed Friend of Leo's

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    Ha, I saw Duarte stacking road case lids and amp covers in front of his twin-like thing. He couldn't get happy and kinda kicked em all aside.

     
  3. Guran

    Guran Friend of Leo's

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    But if you build a wall of Plexi heads in front, it will at least look cool!
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
  4. GoldieLocks

    GoldieLocks Tele-Afflicted

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    I made a plexi-shield from home depot stuff. (ending up costing just over a $100.00)

    I also added some foam around the trim to keep the sound from just sliding out. It certainly helps.

    I can play twice as loud now. Sure it sounds slightly under-water: but it's not beamy and the mic and monitors can do their job. I can hear myself great if I stand close to my amp. If you stand 10 feet away then it's probably a waste of effort and you can get the same result just turning all your treble off.
     
  5. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Update.
    Last night's gig.
    '58 Bassman, '94 Epiphone Sorrento, '69 mutt Tele...plexi shield.
    The room is long and narrow with a low ceiling. Even though it's quite large, sound seems to come off the stage like it was shot out of a gun, so volume is an issue.
    I generally can't get the Bassman past 2.5-3.
    Immediately, I could set the amp around 5 without being too loud.
    This put me solidly in the amp's sweet spot. Beautiful break-up.
    Stepping on just a bit of boost made it amazing.
    The first set was with the Sorrento and it sounded just incredible. I love P90s, and this inexpensive Asian guitar totally delivers the goods!!! One of the best sounding guitars I've ever held.
    2nd set...Telecaster...one of the first things I noticed is I had to turn the amp up QUITE a bit more...at around 7, I ended up using a booster to get enough volume until I got back to the amp and twisted it up even further.
    Do I have to say what an awesome thing it is to play a Tele through a tweed Bassman on 9?
    Although....the overall sound of the Tele did seem to suffer from the shield more than did the Sorrento. It sounded thinner, like there were certain frequencies that were attenuated...it was harder to find the good tone, but it just took some knob twiddling. Thank goodness for TMB and Presence.
    Overall, I'm pretty thrilled with the plexi shield and I think it will be a permanent piece of kit.
     
  6. Obelisk

    Obelisk Tele-Afflicted

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    I don't like plexi shields. For one thing. plexiglass is a really hard and reflective surface, so you can get some weird artifacts in the microphone signal from the bounce off of this plexiglass surface. It usually sounds a bit phasey as a result. Though you might be blocking sounds from other instruments entering into the mic, you still get this weird comb filtering. For recording I found them to be more of a hindrance to get a good sound. A real Gobo is the way to go for blocking sound, but they would be overkill for live work. Yoo ultimately want the sound to travel at a surface with some ability to absorb the sound rather than reflect them back to the source. They do work for blocking sound, so I get why people would choose to use them.

    Depending on your needs, using a closed back cab that isn't pointed towards the audience always worked best for me. The band would balance our sound onstage with a good FOH mixer to balance the levels for the audience. I have some experience with attenuators, but they have some pitfalls. I prefer power scaling over using an attenuator, but it's not an easy solution to implement.
     
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