Astros Busted! Red Sox Next?!

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Texicaster, Jan 13, 2020.

  1. stealyerface

    stealyerface Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    51
    Posts:
    1,614
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Barry is another one that has to take it to the grave.

    He is so vested in the denial now, there is no turning back.

    He and Clemens could have both called a presser, and did just as Bent suggested. Wipe away a tear, beg forgiveness, and say they did it for the good of the team. To get back into the trenches after injury, and fight along side their teammates who they feel they have let down by not being able to play with them.. (Yeah, Andy Pettite, I'm talking to you)

    Now, they took the stuff for a reason. Not their own, selfish reason, but because they were such good teammates. Slap on the wrist, 20-game suspension, and down the road we go...

    Not now. Especially Clemens. Who not only wouldn't man up.. He blamed his wife. Said the steroid order that was dropped off at their house was for his wife. For yoga.

    WTF
    ~syf
     
    getbent likes this.
  2. GGardner

    GGardner Friend of Leo's

    Posts:
    2,188
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2017
    Location:
    NJ
  3. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    40,359
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Location:
    San Benito County, California
  4. LeftToaster

    LeftToaster TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    76
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2013
    Location:
    Vancouver
    I never played baseball beyond the little league level (in the 1970's) and at that level, signs were 1 - fastball, 2 something else - probably not over the plate. But here's the thing I don't get - how did they think it would remain secret? A small group can keep a secret if they all face the same risk if exposed. Steroid use in baseball came out because a) it was widespread and everyone knew about it and b) a handful of trainers, doctors and coaches were involved. The trainers were the weak links because they didn't have enough to lose. Barry Bonds was never convicted for steroid use and his conviction for obstruction of justice was overturned primarily because he kept the circle of people who know what was going on very small (and Victor Conte was willing to serve 4 months rather than flip).

    If we are to believe the MLB official position that the sign stealing scheme was "player driven" - involving "most" of the Astros players, Alex Cora (bench coach) and a handful of video room staff, that's somewhere in the neighbourhood of 30 to 40 people involved. 30 to 40 people can't keep a secret. With player, staff and coaching turnover there is no way it could remain secret.

    Personally I think it's a cop out for MLB to let the players off the hook and lay it all on A.J. Hinch and Jeff Luhnow. Alex Cora is likely going to get a much longer suspension / ban, but MLB does not want the details of what players were involved to come out. So Cora will likely bargain for a 1 or 2 year suspension if he doesn't name names.

    This sign stealing scandal is, as far as I'm concerned, at least as bad for baseball as the PED scandals of the 1990's and 2000's. Steroids didn't just add power to hitters and pitchers. If your ace pitcher could, on average, go 6 1/3 innings rather than 5 1/3 and pitch again on less rest due to accelerated recovery from steroid use, it was a huge advantage in terms of use of the bullpen or how to approach a series. Steroids also reduce inflammation and fatigue which would help pretty much all players. For hitters - according to one report steroids could add up to 5% more bat speed - which would not just help with HRs, but would allow you to get around on a fastball that you would have otherwise fouled off and probably push a line drive or ground ball past the infield. At the same time there was/is wide use of amphetamines to improve focus and concentration - not insignificant in a 162 game schedule. But if a hitter knows what pitch is coming (or at least fastball vs something off-speed) he can go to the plate and simply sit on a change up or fastball regardless of the count. That totally changes the arms race. It varies by year, but based on 2014 numbers, batters had a .282 average with a 1.2 OPS on a 3-0 count versus .166 average and .438 OPS on a 0-2 count.
     
  5. getbent

    getbent Telefied Silver Supporter

    Posts:
    40,359
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Location:
    San Benito County, California
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.