Artesian well has sand in the water.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by 985plowboy, May 21, 2018.

  1. 985plowboy

    985plowboy Friend of Leo's

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    The water supply for my house is a pump and tank drawing from an artesian well that was drilled about 70 years ago.
    We have noticed in the last 6-8 months that there is now fine sand and silt in our water. I have installed a whole house filter on the pressure side of our tank and it catches most of it, but a 3 month filter lasts me about 10 days at best before we notice a big drop in pressure and it must be replaced...at about $12 a pop.
    I am a ways away from the blacktop so it'd be nearly cheaper to have a new well drilled than have city water run to the house.

    Any thoughts?
    Strainer collapse?
    How to remedy?
     
  2. archetype

    archetype Fiend of Leo's

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    At the bottom end of the well pipe are you using a well point designed for sandy soil? Maybe, maybe not. A “sand” well point should have extremely narrow slots in it IIRC. Have a look at the paperwork if it still exists.

    It’s time to consult water well drillers for their analyses and remedies. After 70 years the pipe may be at the end of its useful life. If a proper point would fix the problem, the cheapest fix may be to pull and replace the pipe with the appropriate fitments on the end.
     
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  3. Formerblonde

    Formerblonde Tele-Meister

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    First, I know very little about wells and water quality.

    I suspect the age of the well is a factor and the problem is likely to do with what's changed underground. One guess is that the waterflow has eroded through a layer of soft stone and exposed some sand/silt layer and is being carried up the well with the flow.

    The smart thing is to bring a well tech in to evaluate if the well is 'fixable' or if you're just fighting a losing battle.

    I would be VERY concerned about the effects of those particles on the life of your pressure pump.

    That filter you installed seems to be doing the job, just not for a long period of time. As a stopgap measure, maybe you can increase the life of the filter by reducing the number of particles that reach it. Daisychaining a few intermediate bulk containers [or barrels] to let those particles settle out. You could introduce some cheap rudimentary filters between containers to help minimize what gets through each container.

    Good luck
     
  4. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Curious...isn't sand what's used in fracking?
     
  5. aerhed

    aerhed Friend of Leo's

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    Yah, but your not gonna frack anything with a well pump. Not clear is the tank/pump setup. I assume the artesian fills the tank on it's own and the pump pressurizes? Maybe your pump is in some sand in the tank bottom.
     
  6. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I guess my point was kind of tongue in cheek...as in "any fracking going on within a few miles of you?"
     
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  7. aerhed

    aerhed Friend of Leo's

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    Yeah, I know. I know more about fracking effects than I ever wanted to. People on the other side of the mountains from me have been lighting their faucets. Oops.
     
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  8. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    The sentence is hilarious. The reality is frightening, irresponsible, insane, greedy and suicidal. Sorry it's happening so close to you but we'll all suffer from it before the bastards can be stopped.:(
     
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  9. Wallo Tweed

    Wallo Tweed Friend of Leo's

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    They have been fracking up northern PA for about 7 years now.
     
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  10. Stubee

    Stubee Doctor of Teleocity Gold Supporter

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    I’d guess you’ve got a well point that’s developed holes. May not be the end of the world $ wise to have it pulled & replaced if you’ve got good water otherwise.
     
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  11. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I have two wells on my property. One doesn't last through the summer so had another drilled. It has too much silt in it to use though. Will fill a double filter in an hour of pumping. The first well has some sand but not enough to matter. Had to replace the well pump once in 15 years due to the sharp sand killing it.
    Silt is a big problem because it is so fine it fill filters fast. It will go through any well point.
     
  12. po-boy

    po-boy Tele-Holic

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    i was a geologist in a former life and have installed thousands of ground water monitor wells and dozens of pump

    and treat systems - the latter are very similar to well systems which supply water to homes - if you have only

    recently been seeing the sand and silt in your water it sounds like part of your well casing pipe has collapsed

    or broken and either filter media sand and/or native soil particles are now entering your well casing pipe -

    depending on the amount of sediment your are dealing with, more filters specifically designed to handle sand

    and silt may be the answer - at worst, the well casing pipe can be removed and replaced - redrilling shouldn't

    necessary unless there are other problems with your well - found this link to water well filters ...


    how-to-remove-sediment-from-well-spring-water
     
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  13. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Before you rework the existing well, have a comprehensive analysis of the water and its composition done. There's places in South Louisiana with just a bit too much of this or that in it - some places you see Kidney Stones and some places Cancer. Even back before the Injection Wells were so prominent.

    I've been thinking about installing Filtration on the well pump in the mountains (western NC) but truly, the sediment is not that bad. If I spent all my time there, I guess I would. There's actually a Water Bottling Plant just a couple miles away - the only decent sized commercial activity in miles and miles.
     
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