Are You A Tourist In Your Own Town?

Are You A Tourist in Your Town?

  • Yeah, I guess I am.

  • No, Everybody Knows me

  • No, I Know Everybody

  • No, I'm the Mayor!

  • Yeah, there are whole sections of town I do not know and have never visited

  • Yeah, I pretty much come home, go to the same stores anonymously,no one would know if I moved away.

  • Yean, I want as little contact with strangers or people I know, as I can


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Jim_in_PA

Friend of Leo's
Silver Supporter
Joined
May 31, 2019
Posts
3,365
Location
SE PA - Doylestown PA
This is an evolving thing for us since we move "into" town only 7 months ago. We are getting to know a lot more about things as time passes, including enjoying the many excellent restaurants for our Friday night "date nights" and adjusting some of our shopping habits, accordingly. Our older daughter has been in an apartment in town for two years now and we provide her with transportation and our younger daughter and SO just signed a lease for a small apartment in a house, too. (They can no longer live rent free in our old property outside of town since we finally sold it. :) ) I bought a bike and will get back to enjoying more and more of the community once the weather gets nice again. There is a huge amount of history, culture and just plain interesting stuff here, and we plan to enjoy it.
 

JL_LI

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Joined
May 20, 2017
Posts
8,851
Age
72
Location
Long Island, NY
There's a line in the film Reuben, Reuben....spoken by Frank Spofford (the grandfather) that I can't find right now.....but in effect he says he's that most alienated of all residents of their town.....the NATIVE SON. Meaning, he's lived some place all his life, and he hasn't really changed, but his town has forsaken him.
That's pretty much how I feel.
@nojazzhere , I’ve heard of this but it isn’t me. My wife and I bought a house in the town where she grew up. It was and still is upscale from where I grew up. My wife still fits in. To me, the town suffers from NATIVE SON syndrome. It hasn’t changed but I’ve moved on. There’s more diversity, sure, but the new folks moving in are still narrow minded, anti intellectual know nothings. The kids of those in charge are in charge now. But the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. And left on the ground it just ferments.

It’s funny. My wife says we should have moved. I didn’t care because I was only home half the time. Now that I'm retired and travel just drops you in one Petri dish after another, I have an ever growing distaste for where I live.

Native son? I was never that.
 

Dan German

Doctor of Teleocity
Silver Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2008
Posts
13,754
Age
62
Location
Left of the Left Coast
I’ve only been here since 2014, and there’s a lot to see, so still a tourist in a lot of ways. As for involvement with my fellow man, that’s never been my style, even less so as I age. I would go full hermit if it weren’t for Mrs. German.
 

Cesspit

Tele-Holic
Joined
Oct 16, 2014
Posts
984
Location
Oxfordshire England
The world has steadily moved to a point where I feel I no longer belong. I don't know anyone and don't want to. I'm ok with that but it is sad it's worked out that way.
 

Muddyshoes

Tele-Holic
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Posts
584
Age
63
Location
Twilight zone
I moved across the country 11 years ago to a what I would call a smaller town, I worked out of town so I really haven't met many people. I like flying under the radar.
 

Toto'sDad

Tele Axpert
Ad Free Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2011
Posts
57,767
Location
Bakersfield
This whole district is a tourist area.. the built up coastal strip is only 15mins away and the hinterland has natural attractions as well. Mixed in with a farming community.

Winter and Summer the weather is warm.... you can swim in the sea all year around without wetsuits..;)

tourism is important for our economy, locally. :)
You know it would be cool to live in a place like that. I love the warm weather, and hate the cold, and by cold, I mean anything below seventy degrees F. I would prefer that be the evening cold temp, and the day, no more than 85f. As far as tourism goes, Bakersfield is not known for tourism. I have my own little niche that I'm comfortable in and have no desire to go to certain parts of town where you might have to be a member in good standing of a certain type of organization just to survive.

I haven't been to Los Angeles in years and have no desire to return. It's been twenty-five years at least since I've been to San Francisco, and I have no intentions of ever returning there. Both L.A. and Frisco were once wonderful places to go and have a great time, but they hold no attraction for me now.
 

Toto'sDad

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Joined
Jun 21, 2011
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57,767
Location
Bakersfield
California was once a shining wonderland, there will be those who say it still is, but that's because they never saw what it CAN be, and once was. Today, it's like a shabby hotel, that used to be The Hotel Grande, but that was long ago.
 

StrangerNY

Poster Extraordinaire
Gold Supporter
Joined
Sep 6, 2010
Posts
5,932
Location
Somewhere between here and there
Living in the NYC area there is always something new to explore, and we take full advantage of that.

We find events through an outfit called the New York Adventure Club, and they've got dozens of events going on every week. Through their events, we've been all over the NYC area and surrounding counties, doing everything from taking curling and pickle making classes (that one took place in a restored synagogue) to touring consulates and visiting the workshops of instrument makers, and we've taken walking tours of the Upper West Side and Roosevelt Island. We toured the Webb Institute of Nautical Engineering and the tunnels of New York's old aquaduct system. We even once took a gourmet hot chocolate making course from a Michelin chef, which took place in someone's apartment.

Second week of February, were taking a class in Japanese Taiko drumming, and in Spring we'll be touring the NY Wolf Conservatory.

When we go on vacation we're the biggest damn tourists you've ever seen, and even when we're home we're looking for unusual stuff to do. In a city like New York, you'd be crazy not to go looking for cool stuff because it's everywhere - you just gotta look for it.

- D
 
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1293

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
May 18, 2006
Posts
9,215
I live in a tourist town. It's a never-ending vacation.
 

keithb7

Poster Extraordinaire
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Posts
5,286
Location
Western Canada
This topic comes at an interesting time. 2 years ago my wife and I were a lot more social. Much more involved in our community. I am in an active band, we gigged a fair bit. I am an active member in the local vintage car club. We help organize some events. We attended a lot. Work was a bustle of activity and socializing. Normally we went to restaurants about 2 times every 3 weeks.

Then all of a sudden we were forced to stay within a small group of contacts. All public events shut down. Car Club meetings cancelled. We were told to stay-in and work from home. Restaurants, pubs and nightclubs closed. Gigs disappeared. Watching the news, for a long time was depressing and took a toll. We lost contact with some acquaintances and some relationships eroded. Families grew apart. People started hoarding food, anti-bacterial cleaning supplies, and toilet paper. We eventually gave up caring about what was going on in the world around us. We shut off media. Did our thing at home and weathered the storm.

Things have still not recovered around here. We have been to a restaurant about 4 times in 2 years. Inflation has gone nuts. Pay-checks have not risen. I think twice about going out for a $19 burger and fries. $8 for a draft beer on tap. We definitely have been living in a bit of a home-made bubble here at home. Staying home is like folding your money in half, putting it back in your pocket and doubling it. Gasoline, heat, electricity, groceries, and insurance costs have reached unprecedented levels.

The work place has changed for good. Many employees now work from home. Half of us go in to the office. The lunch room is 80% empty all the time. We are forced to sit 6 feet apart. The few souls in there just stare at their phones all through their break.

Maybe I have indeed become more of a tourist in my own town. I never used to be. I don't want to be. Seems all screwed up these days. I'll shrug my shoulders and do what makes me happy as best I can. At least some of us lived in, and saw this world in the 70's.
 
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Jupiter

Telefied
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Joined
Jun 22, 2010
Posts
27,869
Location
Osaka, Japan
I've lived in the same house in a sleepy bedroom community for 16 years (longer than I've lived anywhere else in my life now), but years could go by without me saying more than good morning to any of the people who live next door or across the street, except for twice a year when we all go out and pull weeds along the neighborhood sidewalk. My real community is comprised of the two schools about a half-hour drive away, that share the campus where my kids have gone to school all their lives, and where I and my wife work, along with a couple dozen other expats and another couple dozen Japanese teachers. It's gonna be weird when my kids graduate and I retire, and I basically won't be allowed to hang out there anymore...

On the other hand, I've been working there long enough that already most of the folks who were there when I arrived have moved on, retired or kicked the bucket, and that's also accelerating, so I guess I'm basically saying goodbye to it little by little anyway. But yeah, in about seven years I'll be kinda homeless... Wonder where I'll go? I honestly don't know yet.
 

studio1087

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Joined
May 10, 2003
Posts
26,079
Location
Near Milwaukee
I moved to Appleton three months ago so I am still a tourist in my own town. I’m new here. The city has a very beautiful theatrical center and they host music events and I’m excited about that. Last week I ate at a Vietnamese and Thai restaurant that was outstanding and I truly enjoyed it. Getting to know the place and so far it’s been very nice.
 

gimmeatele

Friend of Leo's
Joined
Jun 5, 2014
Posts
2,324
Age
62
Location
Alora Spain
Being foreigners in our village we have never felt like such, and have been made very welcome, in the first few days of arriving all the neighbors had popped by to greet and welcome us, and the whole village has been nothing but friendly, it's much like some of the older guys will remember their home towns when they were kids, nothing is too much trouble if you need help and where ever we go around the area people will stop and talk.
It's not like we are unusual being English, we have a world respected Japanese artist living here and multiple other nationalities, it just people are happy to help, so the whole place seems freindly.
 

imwjl

Doctor of Teleocity
Joined
Mar 21, 2007
Posts
12,251
Location
My mom's basement.
I'm not the mayor but have his cell # and he's a Facebook "friend".

@getbent I don't know the right box to check but I probably know more places and people than many. I have been involved in local and county issues, have been on boards and committees and supporting projects. I do lots of 10 - 80 mi bike rides from my driveway where that seems to make things a lot of stuff and people familiar.

Our MTB trail building and volunteering at a ski club with physical facility grew into a monster we never anticipated. What used to be a small posse of 12-20 funsters working on stuff for our interests ended up supporting stuff with thousands involved. The kids lessons, teams and events get where people know me but now there there are too many for me to remember.

The most entertaining or charming can be hosting/guiding MTB rides from the brewery a mile away. They have live music 3-4 nights a week, allow kids and dogs, and it can be very entertaining. It keeps same vibe that's been there for decades, but a nice night can have 150-200 road bikers or people who respond to social media stuff show up. Some nights you are at once a tourist and insider in your place.

People should get out and know their area. Our biergarten scene a mi away gets a lot of different demographics all mixing and happy.
 

naveed211

Friend of Leo's
Joined
May 16, 2009
Posts
4,068
Location
Iowa
We have hung out with our immediate neighbors a bit, mostly because our kids are the same age and have hit it off.

I’m not one to force things, and tend to warm up to people really slowly, so lasting friendships are few and otherwise take time that’s not really afforded. I’m not a social butterfly in the least, but get to know me and have similar interests and I can hold my own.

I do like checking out parts of town I haven’t seen or experienced, so there’s not really a problem there, as much.
 




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