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Are there any advantages to threaded saddles

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by paulblackford, Mar 20, 2021.

  1. scooteraz

    scooteraz Friend of Leo's

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    Apparently, by the number of folks here who love their threaded saddles, you are incorrect. I’m not saying you’re incorrect (I too prefer compensated saddles), but they are saying you are incorrect...
     
  2. Sax-son

    Sax-son Tele-Holic

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    I have a set on a top loader bridge and they seem to work fine on that one. However, they wouldn't be my first choice. There have been some innovations on tele saddles that are definitely an improvement in my opinion.
     
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  3. Tele295

    Tele295 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Would compensated threaded saddles have to have a greater slant on the threads?
     
  4. scooteraz

    scooteraz Friend of Leo's

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    The pitch of the threads would not have much to do with it.

    Actually, if you see a barrel compensated saddle, you can see that there would be two ways (well, 3 maybe). One would be to mill off a segment of the threaded circle so that the bevels were offset a bit. That would leave a pretty sharp edge. You could bore the hole in the treaded rod at an angle (some compensated barrel saddles do this). You might be able to heat the threaded rod really hot and in a controlled manner ovalize the rod so that one part had the height point of the oval ahead of the other half.

    I have seen some old guitars with threaded saddles where once the intonation was set, the intonation screw was bent to angel the saddles correctly. OK, that was four ways....
     
  5. DanDII

    DanDII Tele-Meister

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    They came on my AV '64 and '67 Smuggler.

    I used both until the compensated brass replacements arrived.

    Brass, to my ear, was far less shrill than the steel on both guitars.

    The '67 with the CS '67 pickups was completely
    changed and the ice picky bridge became far more tame with a nice rounded tone.

    I'll stick with compensated brass, thank you very much. ;)
     
  6. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I like that they're steel. That's about it. I don't remove them, but I rarely spec them on a build. Usually it's 5/16" steel, no threads.
     
  7. Ric5150

    Ric5150 TDPRI Member

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    When you consider that nobody has ever achieved perfect intonation on any stringed instrument, “good enough” is pretty much all we have - so who am I to argue about someone else’s “good enough”?
     
  8. FraKo

    FraKo Tele-Afflicted

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    I mounted a set of Fender on a toploader tele. It fixed the unwanted vibrations due to the lack of break angle. I guess they sound kinda bright, which I like on that axe.
     
  9. bendecaster

    bendecaster Friend of Leo's

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    I rest the heel of my hand on the saddles at times and I think they'd chew up my hand a bit, no?
     
  10. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

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    zero issues. I think the original intent was for guitars with WHAMMY BARS to prevent strings from wandering.

    They come STOCK on the 62's ( UsA and MIJ)

    If you're gonna put a Bigsby on a Tele, you will want threaded saddles, make that NEED.

    When Fender Japan issued the 62' with the Bigsby, it came with a floating bridge and threaded saddles.

    IF the saddle screws are too long, and many are that come with saddles, go out to the hardware store and get shorter ones, or go out to the workshop and grind them down a tad .

    Someone said its possible for the string to sit on the TOP EDGE, I'm thinking that is not even possible , they would naturally fall into the thread groove which is much wider.

    You can adjust string spacing if required.

    I have a few sets sittin' around here in BRASS , I forgot I had them !

    No , you can't feel any threads with your picking hand.

    If they were a detriment they would not be on J Masters + Jaguars.

    Many brands of Electric guitars have a Factory GROOVE in the saddle to seat the string , thats the same as a grooved saddle with NO choices !

    we are all so used to the cheap ,smooth , two string saddle ! And we will defend it to our demise ! :eek:
     
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  11. rze99

    rze99 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Strings don’t slide on saddles
    You can bring a top E string in from the edge of the fretboard
    Sound great
    You can bend them a bit to improve intonation.
     
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  12. luthierwnc

    luthierwnc TDPRI Member

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    On two instruments I've repaired I noticed a little slop in the high E and maybe B where the machining has too big a round for the bottom of the string. One guy used 9's. Someone here mentioned a sitar sound. A couple passes with a nut-file can help. Machining seems to vary quite a bit on the precision of the thread bottom. You could do the same if the bass strings are too tight and bind. Haven't used it for that but I rigged a scroll saw to fit a wound-string instead of a blade for abrading exact fret bottoms.

    FWIW, Skip
     
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  13. Willy-son

    Willy-son Tele-Meister

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    Put them on my American original 60s Tele, because I prefer them and they're period correct.
     
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  14. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Kept them on my Palo Escrito for about ten years.

    Then replaced them with the compensated FMIC brass saddles from Darren Riley (Raleigh, NC). Better compensation and easier set up.

    To me, the threading just has a "Git R Dun" look about it, a sort of pre-industrial look that's (believe it or not) too primitive for Tele. IMO. You wouldn't want wooden spoke wheels on a 1950s car, woodja?
     
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  15. Jay Jernigan

    Jay Jernigan Tele-Afflicted

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    I, personally, prefer the sound of brass. Add to that the improved intonation that compensated saddles bring and that is where you find me. Nothing wrong with those, I suppose, and as previously stated they could help hold alignment if something else was off.
     
  16. branbolio

    branbolio Tele-Meister

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    They absolutely make a difference if you need the string to stay in a certain spot... like on my Creston tele that had the high E too close to the edge of the fretboard.

    I’ve had the Glendale Groovy 60s steel saddles and they are compensated for proper intonation. They kept me from pulling the string off the edge of the fretboard and allowed me to adjust the spacing at the bridge just how I wanted it. Also added a little more clarity and brightness to the tone compared to brass.

    So yes I like them and wish I had some on my current tele too
     
  17. Mur

    Mur Tele-Afflicted

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    Everything changes from solid to threaded saddles: tone, attack, sustain/falloff. The threads cause the string to behave almost banjo-like.
     
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  18. TwangToInfinity

    TwangToInfinity Tele-Afflicted

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    i like threaded saddles, but i like the ones with the large diameter flat blade set screws i have a couple and i dont get any at all sitar of banjo'ing

    quite the opposite i get a nice solid no rattle contact all around on those

    i am not saying those things cant happen of course as there are many diff threaded saddle bridge versions
     
  19. dmarcus30

    dmarcus30 Tele-Holic

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    For the benefit of those who may be horrified at my modifying a vintage guitar...it wasn't "vintage" when I got it in 1972, it was just "used". It was my only guitar for years and I did what was necessary to keep it playable so I could gig. I got it for $125 with OHSC from a pawnshop in Tahoe.
     
  20. zeke54

    zeke54 Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Uh , yeah , highly unlikely... but even so , easily remedied ! :) I have them on a couple of my Esquires , as well I have unthreaded steel , they are all the same to me .
     
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