Are the necks you play best on kind of uncomfortable?

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Recalcitrant, Nov 9, 2019.

  1. Recalcitrant

    Recalcitrant TDPRI Member

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    I've tried all kinds of necks, and often suspect that necks I "impress myself" on aren't the same as those I think are comfortable.

    For example, I think a Fender-scale boat neck, with a steep radius, is really luxurious-feeling. But I only wind up playing lazy-a&& stuff on them, only to switch guitars and really tear it up on a thin, flat Les Paul sort of neck, which I hate.

    Does it happen to you? Is ergonomics the enemy of comfort? Or is it…I don't know, the same reason Finns flagellate themselves with birch branches.

    Anyway, I'd be interested in any neck-design philosophy you have. Thanks and best wishes.
     
  2. joeford

    joeford Friend of Leo's

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    i think there's a difference between "comfortable" and "easy". i think fat necks with a vintage radius are extremely comfortable... they're rounded and a better fit for hands... but not the easiest to play fast on. flat and skinny necks are easier to play... but the tradeoff with those fast playing necks is that your hands can get cramped and uncomfortable after a while playing them. i guess it comes down to what is more important to you
     
  3. Chiogtr4x

    Chiogtr4x Poster Extraordinaire

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    I don't know about discomfort inspiring or creating better playing- maybe,
    Your hands/technique are tweaked, as the neck makes you adapt. Creativity takes on a new direction?

    I know that my Danelectro neck ( if I'm using overdrive) with a very fat round shape, jumbo frets/flatter radius, and 25" makes me play more like Cream/Bluesbreakers Clapton, with good bending and vibrato- or like Mick Taylor, Kossoff.
    Expressive, longer lines, less staccato picking and less fast runs that I do on my Fenders- definitely my playing is shaped by THAT neck- or at least there is the potential.

    Edit- Dano is my closest guitar, in this respect, to a Gibson ( which I don't own)
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2019
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  4. Shuster

    Shuster Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    No, they all seem fine, after I warm up a bit!
    thX4FMG1WM.jpg
     
  5. mkdaws32

    mkdaws32 Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    To me I think I’m more inspired playing a guitar that speaks to me tonally more. I find all the necks on my guitars comfortable, but they are certainly all different - I think I just get used to the neck on a guitar that otherwise inspires me. Interesting topic to ponder, though!
     
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  6. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've found that radical transitions from one type neck to another tends to suggest how they want to be played.
    The 'proper' golf grip also killed me for a while before it started to feel natural.
     
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  7. Hiker

    Hiker Poster Extraordinaire

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    Staying adaptable, and having piano (long) fingers makes a difference. Otherwise, I would sell it if there was no strong emotional attachment.
     
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  8. stratoman1

    stratoman1 Tele-Afflicted

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    I won't play a guitar with a neck I don't like. There are too many out there that I do like to bother with any I don't
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2019
  9. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Afflicted

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    The simple answer to your question is no, I make neck to fit my hands and profiles that are comfortable. If you are building custom guitars there is no reason to build a neck that you don't like.

    ps- it is pretty easy to duplicate a neck that you like.
     
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  10. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    I play best on my classic vibe 50's neck because the frets are a nice size and familiarity because ive spent so many hours on it. I own all kinds of necks, frets, radiuses and find that whatever one i play the most for an extended period of time becomes my preferred and easiest neck to play on.

    Years ago when I wasn't as comfortable playing any guitar the neck specs were more of an issue, now I don't really care as long as the guitar stays in tune, is able to accommodate a reasonable string height/ action, does what I want it to do and sounds good. Vintage frets do annoy me though, they are too small to comfortably, without unnecessary effort get my fingers under for bends so I avoid them.

    At the opposite end of the scale my 6000 super jumbo fret neck with 12 inch radius tends to go out of tune up around the nut sometimes due to my heavy handedness and large frets. I'll have to try fitting 11's to see if that helps.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2019
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  11. jfgesquire

    jfgesquire Tele-Meister

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    Last night I played a Beatles show at a nice old theater...

    Opened with my 67 Country Gent, played my Ric 360/12v64, an Epiphone Texan, then a Squier Classic Vibe.

    You can't get any more different... The Gent has a zero fret, the G has to be tuned a little flat to compensate because of the straight bar bridge and the fact that the zero fret is a little taller. I play 10s on that, I don't think even 11s would help, just need to learn to play with light fingers in first position. But the neck is so fast, even for sticky gloss lacquer.

    The Ric is 12 strings in a space smaller than a Chinese Les Paul. It was my first guitar and is now 32 years old.

    Then when I picked up the CV, I looked down at the neck in the middle of Sgt Pepper Reprise and thought "WOW, This is awesome!"

    I could own 10 of those for what my Country Gent is worth (signed by Chet himself), yet that Tele is a GREAT working guitar. I did change out the entire control plate with U.S. components... that's the only thing holding those guitars back from being a serious, reliable, gigging guitar. And that was fixed for less than $30

    I think learning to play on a variety of necks makes me a better guitarist on even my favorite necks. It makes me cleaner and more precise across the board, with lighter fingers, too. At home I play a Martin dreadnought with a 1.75" nut, a classical guitar and even a ukulele.

    And I'm working on restoring this 1941 upright![​IMG]

    Sent from my LG-H932 using Tapatalk
     
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  12. Dismalhead

    Dismalhead Poster Extraordinaire

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    Nah, if it's uncomfortable it's the wrong neck for you.
     
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  13. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    That is a lot of variety, I play a d35 style dred most days as well as a few teles with different necks, frets and radiuses. I have les pauls and a strat, es335, taylor acoustic, epi jumbo but don't play those often. I think I get more uncomfortable with different bridges than neck although they all play fine. I think you are right about the CV 50's tele. After thinking back I loved it from the first time I played mine and I didn't own any other teles at the time. I think i'd struggle with that 1941 upright though but it would be fun trying.:)
     
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  14. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Interesting observation, never thought of that.

    AKA: SOMETHING NEW ON THE TDPRI!!!!

    Time to run out and buy a scratch ticket!
     
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  15. MilwMark

    MilwMark Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Cognitive dissonance. The necks you’ve told yourself you like best and that work best for you are not reality. Let go of your hang ups
    and be free.
     
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  16. dkmw

    dkmw Friend of Leo's

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    I can relate to this. I have found Allparts Fats to be my favorite tele neck. I roll the edges significantly and even modified a couple by removing material from the shoulder on the little e side up by the nut, which has to be blended down to about the 10th fret. I’m creating an asymmetrical V from frets one to about 7 or 8. They are super comfortable for me to play on. I like the space afforded by a fender scale, and the 9.5 radius too.

    But I seem to play better on my junior copy, with a 24.75” scale, medium jumbo frets, and a 12” radius. It’s also barely thick enough (I don’t like skinny anymore) at about .85” first fret to about .90” at 12th. It’s not uncomfortable but I would prefer it thicker.

    I knew this was weird, but it’s always nice to have company when you’re weird:)
     
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  17. rangercaster

    rangercaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    Every guitar is different and brings something different out of the player ... That's why we need more than one ... A Martin acoustic and a Gibson acoustic are not the same ... You can shred on a Super 400 Gibby or play jazz on your Kahler trem Wizard neck Ibanez if you like ...
     
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  18. jfgesquire

    jfgesquire Tele-Meister

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    You try explaining to my girlfriend why I have 5 different acoustic guitars and 6 different electrics!

    I can't imagine what the excuse "but this one is mahogany, that one is rosewood" must sound like to her!

    Sent from my LG-H932 using Tapatalk
     
  19. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2019
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  20. Fiesta Red

    Fiesta Red Friend of Leo's

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    Short answer: No.

    ...however, while I have my favorite neck profile, my guitars all have different profiles, and each of them have their own feel, which makes me play a little different than the others, I understand your premise...
     
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