Are gigs (shows/concerts) really getting more boring and why?

Crows

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Agree with all this...but a positive. Saw Robert Cray recently, small venue, good ticket prices, outstanding and well-paced setlist...and the musicianship was something else. An old fart delivering and an old fart satisfied maybe :) .
 

TunedupFlat

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Isn’t that the truth. Go see a rocking show at the Jubilee Auditorium and have a gang of heavies watching to see who might want to get excited or enthusiastic. They‘ve killed the vibe at nearly every show.

And then at the other extreme have Matthew Good of all people have to stop a show because some people take thing WAY too far. Same at a festival with Alexisonfire having to stop and call some people out for hurting others. Or the guy I almost had a run in with at a RHCP show who insisted on picking fights the whole night and would head butt the back of anyone who tried to ignore him.

The happy medium is the small venues. Punk and metal shows - those scenes people are respectful to each other. When I was doing sound at a bar they were always the best crowds. Enthusiastic, supportive, and respectful that everyone is there for the same reason.
My wife almost got punted from Roger's during Iron Madien for dancing in her seat... It's not like it once was in old e-town.

General douchbaggery is on the rise with guys going to shows just to pick fights.

Venues to play are half of what they were when I first started gigging in the early 90's(definitely nothing like the Sidetrack)

Nowdays we gig out in the smaller surrounding towns that have the space for fun and beer. Places where you can turn it up a bit and people will show up to have a good time.😀
 

Cyberi4n

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I’ve been to two ‘big’ gigs recently. Simple Minds and Little Mix. Both at the Echo Arena (or whatever bank sponsors it now). Each gig to a different audience (aging rockers Vs screaming teens).

Simple Minds came straight on and tore through almost two hours of their hits, plus a few others, and were excellent. A great show.

Little Mix also played an exceptionally good well thought-out show, although NOT my cup of char at all.

No support acts for Simple Minds - they didn’t need any lol. But LM had two, a guy who sang on his own on stage, to a backing track, to a full arena fair play. And a band that had been put together by LM on one of these reality TV pop shows. They were adept but invisible and literally had NOTHING new to bring to music at all.
 

msalama

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Commercial shows? Nah. There's no point paying £$€200 and upwards for a ticket when all my old faves are all way past their prime, and there're no (from my POV) interesting new bands coming up. So why support something that IMO isn't worth supporting anymore?

Free outdoor gigs though? Yeah, every now and then, if the weather's nice and the beer is cold. But that's more like having fun in general, rather than checking out any (new) bands per se. Well unless something really catches my fancy, but that's sadly kind of rare nowadays...

And YES - maybe it's just me rather than the artists out there, but still!
 

BFcaster

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I think in all honesty some of what is going on (or NOT going on) at concerts is caused by violence that seems to happen every couple of weeks. I'm not talking about the usual drunk guys getting out of hand, but more of a road-rage thing. You start getting into it and dancing and really cheering on the band, and somebody may get offended he can't hear or see the show. I know I don't want to get decked at a concert, much less have gun play.
 

Bob Womack

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I've got a theory about us... the millennial guitarists. When we started going to shows, we were new to guitar and the artists we went to see were light years ahead of us. Both the artists and we were young and full of energy, spit, and vinegar. They were attempting stuff out on the edge of the capabilities of the instrument and themselves. The result were exciting, unpredictable shows with lots of magic in the air for us. I remember seeing the Doobie Brothers and being blown away and thinking, "How did they do that?" When they finally left the stage the whole crowd collapsed into their chairs and tried to catch their breath.

Today neither the Brothers nor myself are nearly as full of energy. They've actually gotten better over the years and put on a wonderful, precise show. But I have grown incredibly over the years as a guitarist. I not only know how they "did that" but can do it, or most of it. The mystery is gone. The energy is lower. If I am to enjoy the music, I have to be in a different head space.

Now, if I go to a show by a modern band, I'm lucky if the guitar is anything other than a support instrument, if it is there at all. No-one is pushing the envelope of the instrument.

Now there are exceptions. If Steve Vai or Joe Satriani or Eric Johnson or Tommy Emmanuel come through, there's still the "How did he do that?" factor. But even they are lower energy. Well, Tommy is still pretty hot. :D

Bob
 

nickmsmith

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I think it depends who you’re going to see. If you’re going to see an older act, you’re going to get an older crowd, who is generally more tamed with the years.

When I go to see Billy Joel, Styx, etc.. I’m one of the youngest people in the crowd.

If you take yourself to a metal show, or a modern act for young people (if you want to subject yourself to that) and the crowd will be different.

Best way to avoid the Ticketmaster price gouging is to buy right at the box office. I saved nearly 40 bucks off of two tickets, the last concert I went to. Only in “can’t miss” concerts will I buy in advance anymore.
 

Beebe

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It used to be that you had to go places to be part of a subculture or movement. Now that you can do it from your phone there is less anticipation and excitement surrounding gatherings. ...maybe something like that.
 

Dostradamas

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Life used to be about what you did in the moment.
Stories had value.
Experience had value.
What seems to be valued today is what people are able to post to the world.

Its not what you do, it is what you can post.

Everyone is a unknown internet personality trying to get a million views and "make it."

Performers are competing with the crowd for attention.

Performers pre internet were different and exiting because they were up there doing it and we knew it was hard to get up there.

We would idolize and elevate the musicians to a higher state of being, they were stars.

When everyone can have an audience anytime the "i can do that" mentality reigns.

If everyone can be a star the value of stars diminish.
 

beyer160

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In general, the music industry is more corporate now and touring is big business. There used to be an air of unpredictability about seeing live music, now everything's choreographed and stale. That's why I prefer seeing club bands, who are more willing to take risks and strive for something great and not just settle for predictable, polished professionalism.


I think you’re all just a bunch of grumpy old men for whom nothing will ever be as good as it was back in the day! ;):lol:

(Is this what I’ve got to look forward to???)
Yes.
 

Junkyard Dog

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No spontaneity can exist in this environment:


Note how the guy emphasizes over and over how critical the computer control of the sound system is...all while he literally has an open can of coke sitting out on the keyboard of the laptop!!! :lol:
:lol::lol:
 

FuzzWatt

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I think we change as we age. The world and experience in general aren't so new anymore and with that comes a general sense of.. indifference, for lack of a better term.

Regarding live music specifically - I've read articles/interviews of a fair few well known artists who have complained that audiences have gotten lamer because nobody moves much and everybody's on their phones/tablets, instead of just soaking in the experience.
 

Flat6Driver

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I'm spending some days in middle America (I live on the east coast). I'm at a motorcycle rally. Every night they have two bands. They all seem to follow the likes of who booked them. The line up was this:
- Bad Mojo (covers)
- Strawbilly
- Big Sandy and his Fly Rite Boys
- Rev Horton Heat
- Popskull Rebels (covers in their cow punk style)
- can't recall, they are up next

The "headliners" play Friday night. So that was Big Sandy and RHH. I expected they'd be more fun. I can only take so much rockabilly. I found it to be boring and repetitive. Were they good.players? Yes. But these two cover bands were more fun.

They come on and play and don't talk between every.song and basically ask for applause.

Only other show I have seen in the past few years was dead and company. That was a lot of work to go see even though the venue is practically in my back yard.

I miss $20 shows that were easy ro attend.
20220618_192954.jpg
 




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