Archtop strings for Rockabilly: Flats or roundwounds?

Discussion in 'Other Guitars, other instruments' started by E5RSY, Apr 19, 2017.

  1. NiceTele

    NiceTele Tele-Afflicted

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    I've started sing GHS David Gilmour custom strings 10-48 (round wound) on my Gretsch for rockabilly- I found heavier strings just too hard on my old hands after a couple of hours - sounds mighty good!
     
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  2. ZZB3

    ZZB3 Tele-Holic

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    TI Flats have all of the twang, pop needed for my tele.
     
  3. falcon5romeo

    falcon5romeo Tele-Holic

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    Definitely flats for me. I like the plunk plink sound. Roundwounds ring out too much, especially when using slapback.
     
  4. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    For my archies, I've gone with flatwound G B and high E, and regular D'Addarios for the bottom three. I like the snap and twang on the lower strings.

    The "half-flats" are another option, I've liked those all right, too.

    I'll still take a regular set of D'Addarios over a full flat set
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2017
  5. brenn

    brenn Tele-Afflicted

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    Yep. I tried a set once, just to see why nobody uses them. Had the sustain of a cheap banjo, but without the high end.
     
  6. screamin eagle

    screamin eagle Poster Extraordinaire

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    Am I being dumb here? flats for your 3 top strings? A BT joke that got missed?
     
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  7. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    No joke, it's along the same train of thought as brass saddles for your high strings and steel for your low on your tele, if you follow me
     
  8. screamin eagle

    screamin eagle Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yeah but your high B and E strings aren't wound strings. They're the same strings between sets of rounds and flats. I get the G string, I like a wound G on some guitars, but the B and high E? You buy a set of flats for just those unwound strings?
     
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  9. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I have done that, yes. I've found that they different enough in a good way to make a difference. My perception was, they were warmer, even though they weren't wound

    This is back when I was more finicky about these things, back when I was really chasing a particular tone. These days I am way more likely to be satisfied with just a "standard" set of regular D'addario 10s
     
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2017
  10. screamin eagle

    screamin eagle Poster Extraordinaire

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    Interesting. I always thought that the plain strings were the same between the rounds and flats sets. I'm pretty certain they are in the Thomastik Infeld line up.

    By chance were you unknowingly buys sets of both nickel plated and pure nickel strings and just thought that one was warmer than the other without knowing you were getting different types of strings?
     
  11. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Another for the flatwound-plunk-kills-my-vibe crowd. Used it for a few months on solid bar bridge Gretsch, intonation on the wound G improved, but the whole point of a bar bridge was lost with that flat flat tone.
     
  12. mad dog

    mad dog Friend of Leo's

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    I've tried flatwounds a few times. they have their virtues, but ultimately, I always end up switching back to roundwounds.

    Just went through this exercise with a new (to me) Dearmond T400 hollowbody. The seller had it strung up with TI swing .12 flats. He'd really thought through how he wanted to sound. Those strings worked well with the typically bright sound of the aluminum bigsby bridge. It was a good balance.

    Tried to go with it, but I kept wanting to hear more detail in the base. So just switched to roundwound .12s, and like it better now. IMO, you can always dial out the extra snap from roundwounds, a little off the tone knob, or usually just by not running guitar volumes full up. Whereas with flatwounds, you can't really get that extra clarity back in by turning knobs.
    MD
     
  13. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Anything is possible, I suppose
     
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