Anyone watch Outer Range on Amazon?

Esquire Jones

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I haven’t given up on it yet after seeing 5 or 6 episodes. It’s dark; both visually and thematically. Is that the thing I need right now? Not sure.

There are moments, scenes even, that are riveting. Imogen Poots scares the hell out of me for some reason. I find her unsettling. It brings to mind the video for David Bowies Blackstar. Unsettling.

It’s a a bit rough around the edges but also beautiful in some ways. It touches on some interesting storylines. We’ll see where it goes.

So far ima give it 6 out of 10.
 
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Greggorios

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I liked it. It's clearly not for everyone but it's off-beat enough to have kept my interest up. Somewhat interesting mystery but it's the performances that kept me watching. Great cast, as @Grateful Ape mentioned Lili Taylor is terrific as is Tom Pelphrey (from Ozark), his star's on the rise. I've always liked Will Patton and he's got a great bat sh*t crazy character in this show.

Mainstream movies and TV are beyond formulaic at this point so weird/different is good.
 
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Alex_C

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I found it enjoyable. My wife and I consume quite a bit of TV. We work out, work then hit the couch and binge.
Outer Range is decent, I like weird premises. Severance is also a very odd show that I found quite enjoyable.
 

guitar_paul1

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When Fantasia was in the theater 60+ years ago, my Dad took me to see it. I was disappointed when it ended because the storyline never got going.
Outer Range kind of gave the same reaction, as did the old series Lost. I gave up after a few episodes.
Maybe go back and watch a bit more.
 

aging_rocker

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Genuine question from a non-American - do 99% of folks in Wyoming really wear cowboy hats, like they do in Outer Range?
 

mike stanger

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I wondering about how they are going about their lives and all seemingly ignoring the huge bottomless supernatural hole in the West Pasture.
Yes!
No one can afford to ignore their pastures in Wyoming if they want to stay in the cattle business.
Word of a giant bottomless hole in one would turn the pasture instantly into a local tourist attraction, and everyone would drive into the pasture to get a look at it.
That could ruin the pasture and and any cattle that were in it would either get out the first time the gate was left open or they would be harassed by the sightseers.

I ignored that gaping plot device, but in real life, everything I said would happen. There are people constantly moving through the pastureland in the mountain west, even when it's all fenced in as private property. Planes fly over it, and if there's a creek or river nearby, there will be trespassers who will go to the water to fish.

My family has owned a ranch on the Idaho side of the divide, about 50 miles from Jackson's Hole as the bird flies. All that stuff I mentioned has either happened on our place or on one of our neighbor's, though nothing like the hole ever happened. That would draw national attention in the wink of an eye, being so close to Yellowstone.

There's simply no way something that supernatural could ever be kept secret for more than a few days.
Thanks for spotting that, Winky!
regards,
stanger
 

mike stanger

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Genuine question from a non-American - do 99% of folks in Wyoming really wear cowboy hats, like they do in Outer Range?
Yup.
Wyoming, Southeast Idaho, Montana, Northern Nevada, and Southwest Oregon are still areas where ranching is still done in the old style. There are remote ranches that still have no electricity or phone service, that are over 60 miles away from the closest paved road and 120 miles away from civilization.

They not only all wear cowboy hats, they wear 2 distinctly different styles and go by different names. Cowboys wear what you think is the cowboy hat, with upturned sides and a high crown. They're the ones whose ranches have all the modern stuff, and they'll farm part of their ranch, usually growing hay and grain crops for winter feed.

The other guys are the hard-core drovers that do nothing but herd cattle on horseback. They're called buckaroos, and they disdain all 'ground work'.
The buckaroos typically wear a short-crowned hat with a wide flat brim that's turned up a little in the back, usually black, or rarely, the old Silver Belly, an off-white color.

There guys often don't own a ranch. They travel from one big spread to another seasonally, to herd big herds that are left out on the range year round in places that often have no fences. Some will stay put in one area and work the cattle for an absentee owner for years.

The buckaroos dress differently from the cowboys too. They all wear plain white shirts, never the fancy cowboy shirts, wool vests, and they all wear huge silk bandannas they call 'wild rags'. Leather cuffs, short chaps called chinks, and high-topped boots with high underslung heels. The style is closer to the Mexican Vaqueros than the modern cowboy; Americanized vaquero.

The Buckaroos tend to be families who have been at it ever since the West was settled. There aren't very many of them anymore, but their cattle skills are immense. They'll often be responsible for 2-300 cows, and do all the work alone with nothing but a couple of very smart horses, 2 smart dogs, and a rope that's 60 feet long and about as thick as heavy fishing line.

The Buckaroos are often very handy at some other skills now, because their occupation is slowly closing down. They learn welding, are often good basic mechanics, and they'll drive heavy equipment on road crews and the like when they can't find a job herding.

My family had one who married into ours. He was 6 when he went into town for the first time, and his family lived so far out he never went to school, but he learned math on his own. His birth was never registered, he never had a driver's license, and his wife taught him how to read when he was 32.

He could swing a loop 20 feet wide at a calf 40 feet away in the middle of a herd and never miss. I counted his catches one day, and he roped 65 calves without missing a throw. From one corner of a corral. Never moved out of that spot and covered the entire corral from it.
I've never seen better trained horses than his, and his dogs were as good as a hired man and were super-smart.

He died from sinus cancer, after catching it when he was only 14, probably brought on by the fungus that lives in the deserts out here in the southwest. The fungus lies dormant forever until it rains, then it blooms and will infect the nose and lungs severely if a person is exposed to it for very long.

I own a dog that came from his pair, a scruffy looking Australian Shepherd, the breed that originated here in the mountain west. They're the only breed I've ever owned, and while all my other dogs were intelligent, this one is as smart as a 3-year old human. I have more trouble trying to learn how to teach him something than he does learning it.
regards,
stanger
 
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aging_rocker

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Yup.
Wyoming, Southeast Idaho, Montana, Northern Nevada, and Southwest Oregon are still areas where ranching is still done in the old style. There are remote ranches that still have no electricity or phone service, that are over 60 miles away from the closest paved road and 120 miles away from civilization.

They not only all wear cowboy hats, they wear 2 distinctly different styles and go by different names. Cowboys wear what you think is the cowboy hat, with upturned sides and a high crown. They're the ones whose ranches have all the modern stuff, and they'll farm part of their ranch, usually growing hay and grain crops for winter feed.

The other guys are the hard-core drovers that do nothing but herd cattle on horseback. They're called buckaroos, and they disdain all 'ground work'.
The buckaroos typically wear a short-crowned hat with a wide flat brim that's turned up a little in the back, usually black, or rarely, the old Silver Belly, an off-white color.

There guys often don't own a ranch. They travel from one big spread to another seasonally, to herd big herds that are left out on the range year round in places that often have no fences. Some will stay put in one area and work the cattle for an absentee owner for years.

The buckaroos dress differently from the cowboys too. They all wear plain white shirts, never the fancy cowboy shirts, wool vests, and they all wear huge silk bandannas they call 'wild rags'. Leather cuffs, short chaps called chinks, and high-topped boots with high underslung heels. The style is closer to the Mexican Vaqueros than the modern cowboy; Americanized vaquero.

The Buckaroos tend to be families who have been at it ever since the West was settled. There aren't very many of them anymore, but their cattle skills are immense. They'll often be responsible for 2-300 cows, and do all the work alone with nothing but a couple of very smart horses, 2 smart dogs, and a rope that's 60 feet long and about as thick as heavy fishing line.

The Buckaroos are often very handy at some other skills now, because their occupation is slowly closing down. They learn welding, are often good basic mechanics, and they'll drive heavy equipment on road crews and the like when they can't find a job herding.

My family had one who married into ours. He was 6 when he went into town for the first time, and his family lived so far out he never went to school, but he learned math on his own. His birth was never registered, he never had a driver's license, and his wife taught him how to read when he was 32.

He could swing a loop 20 feet wide at a calf 40 feet away in the middle of a herd and never miss. I counted his catches one day, and he roped 65 calves without missing a throw. From one corner of a corral. Never moved out of that spot and covered the entire corral from it.
I've never seen better trained horses than his, and his dogs were as good as a hired man and were super-smart.

He died from sinus cancer, after catching it when he was only 14, probably brought on by the fungus that lives in the deserts out here in the southwest. The fungus lies dormant forever until it rains, then it blooms and will infect the nose and lungs severely if a person is exposed to it for very long.

I own a dog that came from his pair, a scruffy looking Australian Shepherd, the breed that originated here in the mountain west. They're the only breed I've ever owned, and while all my other dogs were intelligent, this one is as smart as a 3-year old human. I have more trouble trying to learn how to teach him something than he does learning it.
regards,
stanger
Wow, thank you.
That's fascinating stuff!
 

mike stanger

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From left to right
A cowboy; A buckaroo; same guy, whose horse just came uncocked and looks ready to buck; A lady buckaroo, sometimes called a buckarette, who's riding a black-faced mustang; How they all look in the winter.
regards,
stanger
 

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Lawdawg

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Late to this thread but I really enjoyed Outer Range. Even without the sci-fi elements it had lots of weird touches that I loved.

Yup.
Wyoming, Southeast Idaho, Montana, Northern Nevada, and Southwest Oregon are still areas where ranching is still done in the old style. There are remote ranches that still have no electricity or phone service, that are over 60 miles away from the closest paved road and 120 miles away from civilization.

They not only all wear cowboy hats, they wear 2 distinctly different styles and go by different names. Cowboys wear what you think is the cowboy hat, with upturned sides and a high crown. They're the ones whose ranches have all the modern stuff, and they'll farm part of their ranch, usually growing hay and grain crops for winter feed.

The other guys are the hard-core drovers that do nothing but herd cattle on horseback. They're called buckaroos, and they disdain all 'ground work'.
The buckaroos typically wear a short-crowned hat with a wide flat brim that's turned up a little in the back, usually black, or rarely, the old Silver Belly, an off-white color.

There guys often don't own a ranch. They travel from one big spread to another seasonally, to herd big herds that are left out on the range year round in places that often have no fences. Some will stay put in one area and work the cattle for an absentee owner for years.

The buckaroos dress differently from the cowboys too. They all wear plain white shirts, never the fancy cowboy shirts, wool vests, and they all wear huge silk bandannas they call 'wild rags'. Leather cuffs, short chaps called chinks, and high-topped boots with high underslung heels. The style is closer to the Mexican Vaqueros than the modern cowboy; Americanized vaquero.

The Buckaroos tend to be families who have been at it ever since the West was settled. There aren't very many of them anymore, but their cattle skills are immense. They'll often be responsible for 2-300 cows, and do all the work alone with nothing but a couple of very smart horses, 2 smart dogs, and a rope that's 60 feet long and about as thick as heavy fishing line.

The Buckaroos are often very handy at some other skills now, because their occupation is slowly closing down. They learn welding, are often good basic mechanics, and they'll drive heavy equipment on road crews and the like when they can't find a job herding.

My family had one who married into ours. He was 6 when he went into town for the first time, and his family lived so far out he never went to school, but he learned math on his own. His birth was never registered, he never had a driver's license, and his wife taught him how to read when he was 32.

He could swing a loop 20 feet wide at a calf 40 feet away in the middle of a herd and never miss. I counted his catches one day, and he roped 65 calves without missing a throw. From one corner of a corral. Never moved out of that spot and covered the entire corral from it.
I've never seen better trained horses than his, and his dogs were as good as a hired man and were super-smart.

He died from sinus cancer, after catching it when he was only 14, probably brought on by the fungus that lives in the deserts out here in the southwest. The fungus lies dormant forever until it rains, then it blooms and will infect the nose and lungs severely if a person is exposed to it for very long.

I own a dog that came from his pair, a scruffy looking Australian Shepherd, the breed that originated here in the mountain west. They're the only breed I've ever owned, and while all my other dogs were intelligent, this one is as smart as a 3-year old human. I have more trouble trying to learn how to teach him something than he does learning it.
regards,
stanger

Thanks for that super interesting post -- I didn't know any of that! Loved the pictures too!
 

Preacher

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I wondering about how they are going about their lives and all seemingly ignoring the huge bottomless supernatural hole in the West Pasture.

Its been mentioned before about trespassers and such, but some of the ranches up that way are so large and some land owners so heavy handed I could see someone not finding that hole if the land owner was careful. But the fact that his kids and wife never saw the hole kind of left me speechless. Did they not ranch that far forty acres of land as all the area around it looks to be prime pasture.

Of course the hole did disappear on occasional.
 

superbadj

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I dig it. I like weird and some of the cinematography was great. Someone mentioned not knowing where it was going—that’s a plus to me. If I know how a story’s gonna end (outside of historical stuff) I have no interest in watching it.

I liked the weird. I liked the unpredictable. I liked the stylistic approach. It’s not supposed to be truly realistic or normal.

I’ll watch season 2.

Is it perfect? Nope. It was slow at times. But man near the end it picked up pace and got bonkers in a good way.
 




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