Anyone using an undersink RO water system?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by schmee, Nov 21, 2019.

  1. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    Thinking of getting one, my well water is a bit yellow brown in the fall so we buy 5 gal water bottles part of the year for drinking and cooking. It's a PITA.
    They aren't that much money but, they all seem to be cheap plastic valves etc.
    What are the pitfalls of small RO systems?
     
  2. Milspec

    Milspec Friend of Leo's

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    I was a water purification guy in the military when I first enlisted back in '86 and worked for awhile as a chemist for the local municipal water company. RO units do a great job at filtering out contaminants in a water supply line, but the filters do need to be back-flushed or replaced to maintain effectiveness. The under sink models look pretty small filter-wise so depending on how much water you push through them, they might need changing often....probably not real cheap either.

    You are likely getting that yellow-brown from either low water levels or you could actually be getting some pesticide run off into your well. I think it would be a good idea to test that water for iron content and pesticide residues before jumping on the RO bandwagon. I live in a very small town in a rural area and our city water it horrible. The chemist has no clue and the supply lines are ancient not to mention the extreme hardness of the water itself. To me, the water was undrinkable and looked for a solution as well several years ago. Like you, I was not impressed by the construction of RO units out there so I went with a water delivery service from the next city over. They provided me a water chiller and 5 (5 gallons each) bottles each month for $22. It is sort of a pita in the winter to find water bottles sitting on the porch in single digit weather, but the convenience and cost is excellent. It does help the price that I am only a block off the highway so their trucks pass through my town already every month, but there are good deals out there.

    I would skip the RO units and price the water suppliers in your area (Culligan, Deep Rock, etc).
     
  3. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    My son has had one for several years, and has offered to install one at my house to keep me and his mom from having to load and unload drinking water bottles, since we get about five or six cases at a time. I tried the water at his house, and it does taste about the same as bottled water, and is very clear when you look at it in a glass. I'm thinking that I will probably go ahead sometime soon, maybe after the holidays and let him put us one in.
     
  4. DHart

    DHart Friend of Leo's

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    We love our under counter RO system (The Perfect Water) and it wasn't terribly expensive. It also has an anti-bacterial UV light and dual re-mineralizing stages. The re-mineralizing is what makes the RO water taste so good. System was less than $400. And replacing the filters annually is (IIRC) about $100. Prices are all on their website. And they have less expensive systems, also.

    Good company to work with. Easy to install. Easy to change filter units. Great tasting water. It feeds our bar sink and also feeds the water line in our fridge, for ice making and tap water from the fridge door.

    Our well-water is not good tasting, and it is run through a water-softener, which adds sodium. So, the RO system is essential to us for drinking, cooking, ice, and drinking water for our dogs.

    We got their Artesian Full Contact RO system:

    https://www.theperfectwater.com/under-counter/

    This company is local to us, here in Scottsdale, and we've visited their facility. Good people, good products, good business.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2019
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  5. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Friend of Leo's

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    I got this about a year and a half ago for use with my carnivorous plants:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00RR61GOO/?tag=tdpri-20

    (Carnivorous plants take nutrients through their leaves the way "normal" plants do through their roots. As such, CP's roots can actually be damaged by nutrients, minerals and the like their soil or water)

    It's been working fine at a rate of about 12 hours/week to keep full a 40 or 50-gallon tank I use for water for my plants (and it's only rarely less than half-full), outdoors under a roof in all kinds of South Florida weather (I only dismantle it and put it away if we expect a tropical storm or worse).

    Admittedly, I'm not drinking this water, but as I mentioned the tank I store the water in a virtually always at least half full, and is only now (after more than 1.5 years) starting to grow a little algae at the bottom of the tank. This is with the tank also outdoors, and uncovered, so I'd say the water comes out pretty clean.
     
  6. Tenderfoot

    Tenderfoot Tele-Holic

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    Yes, got a Dupure Water Softener / Filter System with under sink RO unit when I bought my present house (new) in 2013. Installed it put me back $7K but has been well worth it. I can monitor system performance as its WiFi telling me water used, amount of material removed from the water, days remaining for salt and when to change the RO filters. The system is easy to self-maintain with the biggest cost being the RO filter (which is one of the three in the RO system, the other two being pre/post filters).

    The Water Softener / Filter System is future proof (extra $1500) as it will remove fluoride if my water district should start water fluoridation in the future.

    I have the water quality tested every two years and it's always been equal or better than a bottle water sample.
     
  7. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've used an RO system at two different houses since 1998. I'd suggest getting it. They are easy to install.

    The rubber bladder in the accumulator tank will wear out/leak and need replacing. Before that you may need to pump it up with air once a year -- like your car tires the air leaks through eventually. The faucet will need replacing occasionally, especially if a kid pulls on it ...

    They help reduce saltiness of water when running a water softener.

    The dog prefers RO water over the general faucet. He has discerning tastes it seems.

    .
     
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  8. schmee

    schmee Poster Extraordinaire

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    Thanks guys. I used RO water on my sailboat and actually like it, otherwise not a big water drinker. We would make RO water from salt water. These low pressure units though I dont know much about , but they seem quite inexpensive. I already have a quality UV light filter I can use with the RO system.

    Milspec: Our water does have a lot of iron in it based on interior of pipes and filters. However most of the year it looks crystal clear. But in the fall when the well is very low, we seem to get that forest floor yellow/brownish tint as we use a dug well/surface well for a few months then.. So I want a dedicated RO water faucet for then so I don't have to carry 45# bottles twice a week! We are 200 feet up a hill, surrounded by forest, and I doubt we are getting any pesticide runoff up here.
    I tried water delivery from the two local sources. Totally unreliable. One never showed at all. The other showed up once and then didnt for 3 weeks. I cancelled and they showed up a week later, I told them to take their jugs and leave.
     
  9. Milspec

    Milspec Friend of Leo's

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    Service certainly can be a problem then...not a uniform condition around the Country though. If there is no reliable source for bottled water delivery, then an RO unit might be a good option. I am still not real impressed with undersink systems, but having a whole-house unit would interest me....though they can be very costly. I would strongly suggest that you test that water on an annual basis if it runs that low in the fall. Clear water doesn't always equate to healthy water, I have seen some very scary test results when I was taking samples for the city.
     
  10. Boil

    Boil Tele-Holic

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    I used to have a Watts zero waste one, I don't have one at the moment but I don't think I would get another zero waste one, I was never that comfortable about the brine being pumped back into the hot water tank.
     
  11. AndyPanda

    AndyPanda Tele-Meister

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    I used one for about 40 years when I lived in Salt Lake City (worst tap water in the country) and have always really liked them. But now I live in a city that has about the best tap water in the country. So I don't use it anymore.

    There are a lot of claims that RO water is corrosive because all the minerals have been stripped out and so the water will now strip the minerals out of your bones (or something like that). But I have a hard time believing that.
     
  12. trev333

    trev333 Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I'm surprised more folks over your way don't have rainwater tanks.... that's all I use....people often comment on how nice my water tastes...

    we haven't had a lot of rain lately, but it doesn't take much to keep my tank topped up... just coming into summer and my tank is full and I have extender pipes on the inputs so it all goes onto the ground now....,

    if it didn't rain for 6 mths I'd still have some in the tank I reckon... though one good thunder storm or some heavy overnight rain tops my tanks up...

    Rain2 feb 15 sm.jpg
     
  13. GTG_Gopher

    GTG_Gopher Tele-Meister

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    Have a small under sink unit, replace the pre and post filters once a year, about $120. Haven't had to replace the membrane filter yet. Love getting crystal clear ice cubes!
     
  14. tap4154

    tap4154 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I used to install those and avoid them like the plague. Especially with the new plastic fittings, they are nightmare that always leak somewhere. Also they do produce corrosive water because they strip all the minerals. If you have metal drain pipes under the sink and a cast iron drain system it will harm them. Demineralized water leeches minerals from the pipes, and from your body, so it's not good for your body to drink pure, demineralized water. In fact ocean desalination plants (one being built near me soon) add back some minerals after the water is purified by reverse osmosis, so it doesn't destroy the pipeline, or your gut.
     
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