Anyone go back to school later in life?

hemingway

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I went to university at 24, back in 1991.

The other students didn't quite think I was ancient, but they definitely seemed young to me. Just children, mostly.

I mostly hung out with the older students - from their 20s through to their 50s - and with a few of the younger ones who could keep up.

I'm REALLY glad I didn't go to uni straight from school. I might have had fun, but I'm not sure I would have done any work.
 

trev333

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Kinda...I ran a band and taught guitar for 6 yrs at the local school...

it was so weird being back at a school, I felt like a grade oner at first, didn't know who was who, and by the time I left, I felt like a grade sixer.... knew everybody... even got a nick name as part of the gang.. Old Beard Man....

Hi, Old Beard Man.. Morning kids...

guitar class 17.jpg
Band practice1.jpg
 

trev333

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the twist of fate was... the same week I volunteered to help with the band another bloke decided to help the band as well, for all those years.
He's hunched over playing something that wowed us... PK from the Church...

one of my fav all time aussie musicians... there we were, running a small school rock band together and I watched him work out the arrangements during practice.... as his band took off again, I kept things going inbetween overseas tours...

just nuts really...
 

Tele-friend

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I am done with school (I have finished a 5 year college).
But I have lots of coworkers (operators and technicians) who work and go to school. I encourage them all to do it if they have the time and will to do it.
 

AAT65

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I took a course with the Open university in the UK, classes were working from home and attending some classes once a week, I was 45 when I got my BA in political science.
I am also an OU graduate -- BA in Humanities, having had a great time studying Shakespeare, Fifth-Century Athens, Italian art, Homer and British Cinema of the 1950s and 60s. It's a nice complement to my first degree, a BSc in Electronic & Electrical Engineering.
 

PoorNoodle

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Went back at 36. Completely different field of study. Got a BSc and then a MSc. Worked full-time simultaneously. Had two kids born during this period. Took online or night classes whenever possible. Somehow had time for music sporadically…

Much easier 2nd time at uni. Better at time management and focusing on what’s important (to me and to pass the tests - not always the same thing). Light years ahead on presentation skills compared to the youngsters. Taught my professors a thing or two in areas where they only had theoretical knowledge and I had practical experience. Totally worth it!
 

P Thought

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Good for you, going back. I turned 40 in teaching school. First thing I noticed was that the kids set the curve--I got great grades!

Edit: retired now, I'm thinking about taking a class or two at the local community college, just to slow my mental decline. Maybe an intro to something I avoided in my youth--I dunno, welding, physics--or maybe a music class....
 
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Crafty Fox

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I was 30 when I went back to college for a 3 year full-time Diploma in Interior & Furniture Design. I wasn't the oldest guy in class either. The course had an initial intake of 36 students but only 6 of us actually graduated, and all of us were mature students.
I'd gladly go back and study. At any age.
Enjoy! 🧐
 

mrfitz98

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Went back to school at 48. I decided there was no way I was going to keep doing the 24/7 on-call I had been doing. Lucky for me I got laid off and was able to collect unemployment (the financial crisis of 2008-2010) while I went to school. I treated it as a fulltime job and devoted at least 40 hours a week to my schooling. It took me 7 semesters (just over 2 years) to get my BS in Systems Admin and Security. My last month of school I was driving past a Managed Services company and had a copy of my resume' with me. I dropped it with the receptionist (who told me they don't normally take unsolicited resumes'.) The owner called me on my cell 15 minutes later. I've been working there for 10 years now and I'm at the point where I'll probably be cutting back to part time to just keep my toes in the water.
 

bettyseldest

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I took a course with the Open university in the UK, classes were working from home and attending some classes once a week, I was 45 when I got my BA in political science.

I

I am also an OU graduate -- BA in Humanities, having had a great time studying Shakespeare, Fifth-Century Athens, Italian art, Homer and British Cinema of the 1950s and 60s. It's a nice complement to my first degree, a BSc in Electronic & Electrical Engineering.

I first graduated with a BSc in Industrial Studies back in '79, and entered employment with the water authority. In '02 the company re-organised, the result was I ended up a couple of steps on the ladder below where I believed I deserved to be. I enjoyed the job, thought it was important, but not a challenge. The Open University offered a first degree Masters in Mathematics, which if studied half time would take until '10 to complete whilst still working full-time and raising a family. Before I completed the first year I was promoted three times, to a level which I found challenging, but continured to study. A couple of years later the OU pulled the plug on the qualification, so I took a year off then used the credits towards a Maths degree. I had another year off when my mum died, but graduated with a BA in Mathematics in 2010, aged 53. I took the degree for my own enjoyment, I declined funding and time off from my employer, I enjoyed it, it changed me, which my employer benefitted from, but it's my degree. Having retired over four years ago I'm now considering further study. The Introduction to Humanities unit looks interesting.
 

naveed211

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I went back, but it was completely online, so I didn’t really feel out of place. If I was older than everyone (Probably most), I wouldn’t have known it.

I dropped out of two colleges after I graduated high school, just wasn’t ready or in the right mindset. I went back when I was ready in my late 20s-early 30s and I crushed it and got my Bachelor’s (Magna Cum Laude from the University of Wisconsin system).

Don’t sweat it. Just keep your head down and keep working hard!
 

Tek1

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Community College part time at 42, some day, some at night. I did not feel out of place. Business Admin. / Computer Science. Would like to think I gave a different insight in class. My oldest went there. It was so cheap I sent us both. Had fun with the people in class. I did not socialize with them other than class. Never walked. One class had to team with a young girl on a project. When the presentation came I was a gentleman and let her present first. She got up introduced herself. Then immediately introduce me to give the presentation. I learned a lesson that day.
 

Chester P Squier

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Started going to university in 1969, partly to get an education, partly to avoid the draft during the Viet Nam era. I managed to flunk out shortly before the draft ended in 1973, was reclassified 1A. Then the draft ended, and so did my reason for going to school at that point. Fast forward 5 years, mostly supporting myself playing music. I met my wife, married her, and settled into married life, and quickly ran up against one of the financial truths: Banks and mortgage companies do not like self-employed musicians.
After a move to East Texas, I encountered a man that had a profound effect on my life. Frank Beard, related to his much more famous counterpart with the same name, who was an educator, who took me aside one day and told me he thought I had the makings of a good teacher. I related the contents of the conversation to my wife, who decided there and then it was to be. I investigated the local University of Texas at Tyler, and found the credits I had amassed in my earlier stupid years would transfer and not count against me grade point-wise. With a semi fresh start, it took me five semesters and a couple of summer sessions to finish my BS degree in Elementary Education at the age of 41. My wife had completed an Associates Degree as a Diet Technician before our move, at around age 34. She went on to get her BS in Dietetics and became a Registered Dietitian, while being visually impaired. I went on to have a 21 year career as an educator, eventually teaching all grades K-12, and retired 10 years ago. I went back to playing music (although I never really stopped playing, usually on weekends) as an income enhancement, and I can't think of when I've been more content with my life. I can truly say that going back to school brought financial security and a fulfilling professional career- Go back and get your degree later in life, because you'll be doing it for the right reasons and the maturity that comes with being later in life means less distractions and more success. Best of luck to the OP, hope you graduate at least Magna Cum Laude like I did (couldn't resist the little brag, sorry).
Good on you for being an elementary school teacher. From your post, you're obviously a man, and elementary school children need a male example at that age. Especially the boys. You did good!

I went back to college in my mid-50s to get an accounting degree. I had worked in the retail profession for a corporation that had thrived in its heyday and was fun to work for, but work ceased to be enjoyable. After I left the company, they went out of business altogether.

I actually got a job that I held for 11 years. My wife and I got a box of Just For Men and I disguised myself as a younger man and got hired.
 

draggindakota

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I went back to college in my late 30s to complete a Bachelor Science. I had an AAS and was already into my 2nd career (3rd counting musician) but needed the degree to move up at my job. it was work... I had no life for a couple years except work and school. getting the minimum credits is no problem... its the 42 upper division credits that causes the work... every UD class has a couple lower division classes as a prerequisite. instead of "just" 120 credits you can end up doing 160 unless you choose carefully. look for UD classes with either low prereq's or prereq's that you will have because of your major

That's definitely good advice. I made sure when I was taking classes previously to check the prerequisites for the engineering program. I took all the science and math courses I needed back then. I'm sure something has change in the ensuing years, but I haven't looked into that yet.

Two classes? I'm sure you'll get used to it.

Two to get my AA, then at least 2 years full time for the BS. I might graduate by the time I'm ready to retire :lol:
 

jumpnblues

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Started dental school at the age of 37, graduated at 41, completed my hospital dentistry residency at age 42. Began a private practice in general dentistry. Practiced for 24 years, retired 6 years ago.

I had changed careers several times (commercial pilot and flight instructor, community college counselor, job seeking skills instructor) before returning to school and settling into dentistry.
 

rodger

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I got an Associate Degree in Electronics in 1975. 22 years later at 43, I went back to a state college to begin work on a Bachelor. It was me and classes of 18 - 20 year olds. I felt very out of place. As someone mentioned previously, the competition was not great. Easy A's. I was there for about 7 years, then...

Found a private college that had an accelerated program for older, working adults. I transferred and suddenly I was in classes with folks much closer to my age and motivation. Great experience. Got my Bach in Business Management. The college was previously an all girls school that had recently gone co-ed. I was the only male in many classes I was in. Me and a dozen ladies. A lot of times, I was asked about the "male perspective" on topics. This was both a good and bad thing sometimes.

A couple years later, I thought "what the heck." Went back to the same college in the MBA program. At the age of 66 (almost 67), got a Masters in Healthcare Service Management this past June.

Maybe there is a similar older adult program at a local college?
 
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Whatizitman

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Good for you!! Most kids will think you're a professor taking classes for professional development. And you'll be surprised how many people in their 30's and much older will be taking classes.

That, or a grad student. That is, if OP's school has graduate programs.

OP, seek out resources for "non-traditional students". Talk to your advisor, admissions, counseling center, etc... Basically, anyone who might know of such resources. They are at every campus. You just may have to ask around.

You're not alone. Kudos to you for taking the chance, though, as there are not enough who do. Many won't. Everyone has their situations and reasons. But I can't help but wonder if some who argue "it's not worth it" for some ideological or economic reason don't also secretly wish they could be in your shoes.

All education is a worthwhile investment, IMO. Y'know what's worse than debt? Not getting some form of higher education. Whether it's hard knocks, trade, or a BA. Learning, questioning the world and old assumptions, opening your mind up to new horizons is worth it. Period. That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.
 




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